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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Prevention Science
Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts
New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. This research is especially significant since Mexican American youth face significant barriers that lead them to have one of the highest high-school drop-out rates in the nation.

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Depression and Anxiety
Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers
Two new reports show that new soldiers and civilians do not differ in their probability of having at least one lifetime mental disorder but that some mental disorders are more common among new soldiers than civilians. In addition, the rates of pre-enlistment suicidality among new soldiers are comparable to matched civilians.
US Department of the Army, US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Health Services
Paperwork consumes one-sixth of US physicians' time and erodes morale: Study
The average US doctor spends 16.6 percent of his or her working hours on non-patient-related paperwork, time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients, according to an analysis of a nationally representative survey of physicians. Current trends in US health policy -- a shift to employment in large practices, the implementation of electronic medical records, and the increasing prevalence of financial risk sharing -- are likely to increase doctors' paperwork burdens and may decrease career satisfaction.

Contact: Mark Almberg
mark@pnhp.org
312-782-6006
Physicians for a National Health Program

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Two days later: Adolescents' conflicts with family spill over to school, vice versa
Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day. A new study has found that these problems spill over in both directions for up to two days after. The study found that teens with more pronounced mental health symptoms, anxiety and depression, for example, are at risk for intensified spillover. The study followed over a hundred 13 to 17 year olds and their parents over a 14-day period.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Obesity Surgery
How people view their own weight influences bariatric surgery success
Negative feelings about one's own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research appearing in the journal Obesity Surgery, published by Springer. The study, from the Geisinger Health System in the US, is considered the first and only study to examine internalized weight bias in relation to post-surgical weight loss success in adults.
Living Heart Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Susceptibility for relapsing major depressive disorder can be calculated
The question if an individual will suffer from relapsing major depressive disorder is not de-termined by accident. Neuroscientists from the Mercator Research Group 'Structure of Memory' have chosen a new research approach, using computer-based models to study the disease. They show that chronic depression is triggered due to an unfortunate combination of internal and external factors. Their research findings were published in the journal PLOS ONE.
Stiftung Mercator

Contact: Selver Demic
selver.demic@rub.de
49-023-432-29616
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
2014 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium
Early palliative care can cut hospital readmissions for cancer patients
Doctors at Duke University Hospital have developed a new collaborative model in cancer care that reduced the rates at which patients were sent to intensive care or readmitted to the hospital after discharge. The Duke researchers shared their findings today at the Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
New Horizons in Science 2014
Study shows how troubled marriage, depression history promote obesity
The double-whammy of marital hostility and a history of depression can increase the risk for obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jan Kiecolt-Glaser
Janice.Kiecolt-Glaser@osumc.edu
614-293-0549
Ohio State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs may have an impact on depression
Ordinary over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs purchased from pharmacies may also be effective in the treatment of people suffering of depression. This is shown by the largest ever meta-analysis that has just been published by a research group from Aarhus University in the American scientific journal JAMA Psychiatry. The meta-analysis is based on 14 international studies with a total 6,262 patients who either suffered from depression or had individual symptoms of depression.
Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH

Contact: Ole Köhler
karlkoeh@rm.dk
45-23-42-06-61
Aarhus University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Even depressed people believe that life gets better
Adults typically believe that life gets better -- today is better than yesterday was and tomorrow will be even better than today. A new study shows that even depressed individuals believe in a brighter future, but this optimistic belief may not lead to better outcomes. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
British Medical Journal
Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life
Those who self-harm as teenagers are more at risk of developing mental health and substance misuse problems as adults, new research from the biggest study of its kind in the UK has revealed.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Epidemiology
Largest study of Hispanics/Latinos finds depression and anxiety rates vary widely among groups
Rates of depression and anxiety vary widely among different segments of the US Hispanic and Latino population, with the highest prevalence of depressive symptoms in Puerto Ricans, according to a new report from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. The researchers' findings also suggest that depression and anxiety may be undertreated among Hispanics and Latinos, particularly if they are uninsured. The study was published online in Annals of Epidemiology.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress-related inflammation may increase risk for depression
Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johnson and Johnson International Mental Health Research Organization, Irma T. Hirschl/Monique Weill-Caulier Trust, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Brain and Behavior Research Organization

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Translational Psychiatry
Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action
A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of -- and ahead of -- its other antidepressant effectsWithin 40 minutes after a single infusion of ketamine, treatment-resistant depressed bipolar disorder patients experienced a reversal of a key symptom -- loss of interest in pleasurable activities -- which lasted up to 14 days. Brain scans traced the agent's action to boosted activity in areas at the front and deep in the right hemisphere of the brain.
National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014
Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after heart attack
Patients with depression are nearly six times more likely to die within six months after a heart attack than those without depression. The increased risk of death in patients with depression persists up to 18 months after the heart attack. But despite the fact that post-heart-attack depression is common and burdensome, the condition remains under-recognized and under-treated.

Contact: Jacqueline Partarrieu
press@escardio.org
33-492-947-756
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Medical Acupuncture
Should first responders use acupuncture & integrative medicine in natural disasters & battle zones?
Delivering traditional emergency medical care at ground zero of natural disasters and military conflicts is challenging. First responders trained in simple integrative medicine approaches such as acupuncture, hypnosis, or biofeedback can provide adjunctive treatment to help relieve patients' pain and stress. How to teach and utilize modified techniques and their potential benefit are described in a Review article in Medical Acupuncture.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry
Youth suicide: More early detection and better coordination are needed
Although progress has been made in recent years, the matter of youth suicide in Quebec still needs to be more effectively addressed. In fact, a new study in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry shows that more lives could be saved through early detection and increased public awareness and information sharing among professionals.
Canadian Institute of Health Research, Standard Life, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Florence Meney
florence.meney@douglas.mcgill.ca
Douglas Mental Health University Institute

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Epilepsia
Have you heard of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy?
Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is concerning and many -- even those with seizure disorders -- may not be aware of this condition. New research published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy, reports that 76 percent of caregivers are more likely to have heard of SUDEP compared with 65 percent of patients with epilepsy.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Fewer depressive symptoms associated with more frequent activity in adults at most ages
On average, more frequent physical activity was associated with fewer depressive symptoms for adults between the ages of 23 and 50 years, while a higher level of depressive symptoms was linked to less frequent physical activity.
Public Health Research Consortium

Contact: Christine Power
Christine.power@ucl.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Leisure time physical activity linked to lower depression risk
Being physically active three times a week reduces the odds of being depressed by approximately 16 percent, according to new University College London research undertaken as part of the Public Health Research Consortium. The study, published in JAMA Psychiatry, found a two-way relationship between depression and physical activity. People who increased their weekly activity reported fewer depressive symptoms but those with more depressive symptoms were less active, particularly at younger ages.
Public Health Research Consortium

Contact: Siobhan Pipa
siobhan.pipa@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-767-99041
University College London

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Qualitative Health Research
CWRU studies how women in recovery manage personal networks with family and friend users
Substance abuse counselors and social workers often recommend recovering addicts establish new networks of non-using friends and supporters. But researchers at Case Western Reserve University's social work school found, for many women in poverty, it's not so easy to drop the users in their lives. Many are people that women depend on for childcare, transportation and other necessities to live.
Case Western Reserve University

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Impact of mental stress on heart varies between men, women
Men and women have different cardiovascular and psychological reactions to mental stress, according to a study of men and women who were already being treated for heart disease.

Contact: Beth Casteel
bcasteel@acc.org
202-375-6275
American College of Cardiology

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
No association seen between physical activity, depressive symptoms in adolescents
A study of teenagers suggests there is no association between physical activity and the development of depressive symptoms later in adolescence.

Contact: Umar Toseeb
umar.toseeb@manchester.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Teenage girls are exposed to more stressors that increase depression risk
Adolescence is often a turbulent time, and it is marked by substantially increased rates of depressive symptoms, especially among girls. New research indicates that this gender difference may be the result of girls' greater exposure to stressful interpersonal events, making them more likely to ruminate, and contributing to their risk of depression. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Psychology of Popular Media Culture
Study: 'Broad consensus' that violent media increase child aggression
Majorities of media researchers, parents and pediatricians agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children, according to a new national study.

Contact: Brad Bushman
Bushman.20@osu.edu
614-688-8779
Ohio State University