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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Revolutionary microshutter technology hurdles significant challenges
NASA technologists have hurdled a number of significant technological challenges in their quest to improve an already revolutionary observing technology originally created for the James Webb Space Telescope.
NASA

Contact: Lori Keesey
lori.j.keesey@nasa.gov
865-244-6658
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
A new way to make microstructured surfaces
A team of researchers has created a new way of manufacturing microstructured surfaces that have novel three-dimensional textures. These surfaces, made by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes, could exhibit a variety of useful properties -- including controllable mechanical stiffness and strength, or the ability to repel water in a certain direction.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Tough foam from tiny sheets
Tough, ultralight foam of atom-thick sheets can be made to any size and shape through a chemical process invented at Rice University.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mike Williams
mikewilliams@rice.edu
713-348-6728
Rice University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Optimum inertial self-propulsion design for snowman-like nanorobot
Swimming microorganisms are subjected to relatively small inertial forces compared to the viscous forces exerted by the surrounding fluid. Such low-level inertia makes self-propulsion a major challenge. Scientists have found that the direction of propulsion made possible by such inertia is opposite to that induced by a viscoelastic fluid. This study published in EPJ E could help optimise the design of self-propelled micro- and nano-scale artificial swimming machines to improve their mobility in medical applications.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Chemistry
New method provides researchers with efficient tool for tagging proteins
With a new method, researchers use a piece of DNA engineered to bind to metal ions. Using this 'control stick,' they direct another piece of DNA to a metal binding site on the protein.

Contact: Christian B. Rosen
crosen@chem.au.dk
Aarhus University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
The quantum Cheshire cat: Scientists separate a particle from its properties
The quantum Cheshire cat: Can a particle be separated from its properties? On July 29, the prestigious journal, Nature Communications, published the results of the first Cheshire Cat experiment, separating a neutron from its magnetic field, conducted by Chapman University in Orange, Calif., and Vienna University of Technology.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Langmuir
Seeing is bead-lieving
Rice scientists make models for polymer macromolecules using magnets and DNA 'springs' that can be tuned for flexibility.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mike Williams
mikewilliams@rice.edu
713-348-6728
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Building 'invisible' materials with light
A new technique which uses light like a needle to thread long chains of particles could help bring sci-fi concepts such as cloaking devices one step closer to reality.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology
Scientists test nanoparticle 'alarm clock' to awaken immune systems put to sleep by cancer
Researchers explore ways to wake up the immune system with nanoparticles so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells.

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
Breakthrough laser experiment reveals liquid-like motion of atoms in an ultra-cold cluster
A new study by researchers from the University of Leicester has furthered our understanding of how tiny nanosystems function, unlocking the potential to create new materials using nanosized 'building blocks'.

Contact: Gediminas Galinis
gg97@leicester.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
ORNL study reveals new characteristics of complex oxide surfaces
A combination of microscopy and data processing has given researchers an unprecedented look at the surface of a material known for its unusual physical and electrochemical properties.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut
A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Korean Ministry of Science

Contact: Weibo Cai
wcai@uwhealth.org
608-262-1749
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New approach to form non-equilibrium structures
Northwestern University researchers get closer to understanding the fundamentals of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures, unlocking potential in a variety of fields.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Delaware researcher describes new approach for creating organic zeolites
In a landmark paper published in the international scientific journal Nature Communications, University of Delaware researcher Yushan Yan describes a new approach to creating organic zeolites.

Contact: Donna O'Brien
dobrien@udel.edu
University of Delaware

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
European Physical Journal B
Unleashing the power of quantum dot triplets
Quantum computers have yet to materialize. Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable means of making such computers faster. One such approach relies on quantum dots -- a kind of artificial atom, easily controlled by applying an electric field. A new study published in European Physical Journal B demonstrates that changing the coupling of three coherently coupled quantum dots with electrical impulses can help better control them.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Cost-effective, solvothermal synthesis of heteroatom (S or N)-doped graphene developed
A research team led by group leader Yung-Eun Sung has announced that they have developed cost-effective technology to synthesize sulfur-doped and nitrogen-doped graphenes which can be applied as high performance electrodes for secondary batteries and fuel cells.
Institute for Basic Science, Center for Integrated Smart Sensors, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Hanbin Oh
ohanvin@ibs.re.kr
82-428-788-182
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
ETH student develops filter for clean water around the world
An innovative filter makes it possible to purify water more quickly, simply and economically than ever before. The developers hope the device will soon play a big role development aid, and they are looking for investors to help them achieve this goal.

Contact: Media Releations ETH Zurich
mediareleations@hk.ethz.ch
41-446-324-141
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Nano-sized chip 'sniffs out' explosives far better than trained dogs
A groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor devised by Tel Aviv University's Professor Fernando Patolsky picks up the scent of explosives molecules better than a detection dog's nose. The device is mobile, inexpensive, and highly accurate, detecting explosives in the air at concentrations as low as a few molecules per 1,000 trillion.
Tracense

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nano Research
A crystal wedding in the nanocosmos
Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, the Vienna University of Technology and the Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Lublin have succeeded in embedding nearly perfect semiconductor crystals into a silicon nanowire. With this new method of producing hybrid nanowires, very fast and multi-functional processing units can be accommodated on a single chip in the future. The research results will be published in the journal Nano Research.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Physical Review A
Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals
Physicists Sergei Filippov and Mario Ziman have found a way to preserve quantum entanglement of particles passing through an amplifier and, conversely, when transmitting a signal over long distances.

Contact: Alexandra O. Borissova
borissova@phystech.edu
7-498-744-6526
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
ACS Nano
NIST shows ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast
Vibrate a solution of rod-shaped metal nanoparticles in water with ultrasound and they'll spin around their long axes like tiny drill bits. Why? No one yet knows exactly. But NIST researchers have clocked their speed -- and it's fast. At up to 150,000 revolutions per minute, 10 times faster than any nanorotor ever reported.

Contact: Mark Esser
mark.esser@nist.gov
301-975-8735
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Optica
'Comb on a chip' powers new NIST/Caltech atomic clock design
NIST and CalTech researchers have demonstrated a novel design for a small atomic clock that is based on a chip-scale frequency comb, or a microcomb.

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
303-497-4880
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
ACS Nano
NUS scientists use low cost technique to improve properties and functions of nanomaterials
By 'drawing' micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applications

Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Carbyne morphs when stretched
Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator. The research has implications for mechanically activated nanoscale electronics and optics.
Robert Welch Foundation, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
More than glitter
A new study from MIT materials scientists reveals that these nanoparticles enter cells by taking advantage of a route normally used in vesicle-vesicle fusion, a crucial process that allows signal transmission between neurons. In the July 21 issue of Nature Communications, the researchers describe in detail the mechanism by which these nanoparticles are able to fuse with a membrane.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology