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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Journal of Marketing
Catering to needs of in-store, online customers boosts marketing effectiveness, revenue
A University of Missouri researcher found that consumers' preferences differ when they are shopping in a physical store compared to shopping online. Catering to shoppers' online and in-store preferences can increase the effectiveness of traditional marketing tactics such as direct marketing and enhanced customer service, the researcher found.

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science
One firm's loss is another's gain
Good news for savvy businesses: customers who walk through your doors unhappy with another firm's service can be won back with simple gestures of goodwill.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Public Policy and Marketing
The Trojan Horse burger: Do companies that 'do good' sell unhealthy food?
When consumers see a company performing good deeds, they often assume that the company's products are healthy. According to a new study in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing this may be far from true, and the company's socially responsible behavior may be creating a 'health halo' over unhealthy foods.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
mtwist@ama.org
608-255-5582
American Marketing Association

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Marketing
Good cause + moderate discount = more sales
Many businesses now offer customers the opportunity to make charitable donations to good causes along with their purchases, but does this really encourage the customer to buy more? According to a new study in the Journal of Marketing, the answer is a firm 'Yes.'

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
mtwist@ama.org
608-255-5582
American Marketing Association

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Marketing Research
A heavier price: How do restaurant surcharges and labeling improve health?
The American obesity epidemic is out of control, and health advocates are working hard to ensure that food labels clearly list calorie content and all unhealthy ingredients. But according to a new study in the Journal of Marketing Research, labeling alone contributes little to healthier eating decisions unless the item also costs more.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
mtwist@ama.org
608-255-5582
American Marketing Association

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Marketing Research
How do you really feel about the cake? Emotional awareness promotes healthier eating
As obesity rates rise, health professionals and policy makers scramble to help consumers resist unhealthy eating choices, often focusing on better labeling and improved nutritional knowledge. According to a new study in the Journal of Marketing Research, however, training people to pay attention to their emotions is a far more powerful strategy.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
mtwist@ama.org
608-255-5582
American Marketing Association

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Public Policy and Marketing
They have a pill for that: How are weight loss drugs fueling the obesity epidemic?
Consumers place great faith in weight loss pills and remedies, buying and using them more than ever before. American obesity rates, however, are skyrocketing. According to a new study in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, false beliefs about these drugs are causing Americans to gain more weight.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
mtwist@ama.org
608-255-5582
American Marketing Association

Public Release: 7-Nov-2014
Computers in Human Behavior
UTSA professor studies cell phone habits of college students in US and South Korea
UTSA communication associate professor Seok Kang teamed up with a Korean researcher to study the cell phone habits of 1,600 college students in the US and South Korea. Kang determined that mobile media is standardizing communications across the globe and that students studied were turning more to their mobile phones to find information rather than to traditional media.

Contact: Kris Rodriguez
kris.rodriguez@utsa.edu
210-458-5116
University of Texas at San Antonio

Public Release: 7-Nov-2014
Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports
NFL TV ratings: Bandwagon is everyone's second-favorite team
A study found that NFL fans love match-ups of winning teams as much or more than watching their favorite team.

Contact: Joe Hadfield
joe_hadfield@byu.edu
801-422-9206
Brigham Young University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Campaign to reduce firearm suicide wins support among firearm retailers in New Hampshire
Nearly half of firearm retailers in New Hampshire displayed materials from a firearm suicide prevention campaign generated by a coalition of gun owners and public health professionals.
Riley's Sport Shop Inc., New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Joyce Foundation, Bohnett Foundation, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Dartmouth University

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Journal of Environmental Psychology
Future-focused women stand up to global warming with taxes, checkbook
Politicians who discredit global warming risk losing a big chunk of the female vote. A new study found women who consider the long-term consequences of their actions are more likely to adopt a liberal political orientation and take consumer and political steps to reduce global warming. Jeff Joireman, associate professor of marketing at Washington State University, demonstrated that 'future-oriented' women are the voting bloc most strongly motivated to invest money, time and taxes toward reducing global warming.

Contact: Jeff Joireman
joireman@wsu.edu
509-335-0191
Washington State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Bar attendance supports heavy drinking by young adults in the US-Mexico border region
Mexico is a nearby destination where younger US residents can legally drink heavily. However, high levels of drinking on the US side are not always linked to recent travel to Mexico. New findings show that higher levels of drinking among US-Mexico border youth are closely linked to their patterns of bar attendance, but not to how they think about drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Britain A. Mills
britain.mills@utsouthwestern.edu
817-677-8557
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Public Understanding of Science
Blinded by science
Your faith in science may actually make you more likely to trust information that appears scientific but really doesn't tell you much. According to a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study, including trivial elements such as graphs or formulas in product information can lead consumers to believe products are more effective. 'Anything that looks scientific can make information you read a lot more convincing,' says the study's lead author Aner Tal, Ph.D.

Contact: Aner Tal
at425@cornell.edu
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Marketing Science
Product placement can curb TV commercial audience loss by more than 10 percent: INFORMS study
Coordinating product placement with advertising in the same television program can reduce audience loss over commercial breaks by 10 percent, according to a new study in the Articles in Advance section of Marketing Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
International Computer Music Association 2014
New way of syncing music to video will revolutionize TV ads
A University of Huddersfield researcher has shown that tiny tweaks to the soundtrack can make TV adverts much more memorable, increasing their commercial impact.

Contact: Nicola Werritt
n.c.werritt@hud.ac.uk
01-484-473-315
University of Huddersfield

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health
Social trust eroded in Chinese product-tampering incident
For about a decade, Chinese consumers weren't getting what they paid for when they purchased Wuchang, a special brand of gourmet rice that has a peculiar scent. The quality was being diluted when less expensive rice was aromatized, added to the packages of the high-quality rice, and sold at the premium price. Researchers at the University of Illinois studied how the tampering scandal affected the public's perception of risk and their subsequent behavior.

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
The Costco effect: Do consumers buy less variety at bigger stores?
Do consumers make the same choices when products such as beer, soft drinks, or candy bars are sold individually or in bundles? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers purchase a greater variety of products when they are packaged individually rather than bundled together.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Feeling guilty or ashamed? Think about your emotions before you shop
Suppose you grabbed a few cookies before heading out to the grocery store and start to feel guilty or ashamed about breaking your diet. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, feeling guilty might find you comparing calories in different cartons of ice cream. Feeling ashamed might keep you from buying any ice cream in the first place.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Marketing an innovative new product? An exciting product launch could hurt sales
Should every successful product launch involve some sort of dazzling spectacle? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research tells us that this might be a great way to market an upgrade, but a flashy launch could backfire if a new product is truly innovative.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Country of origin: Are negative stereotypes always bad for business?
Consumers worldwide associate France with fashion and luxury and are willing to pay a lot for French luxury products such as perfume and wine. But what about products made in countries with less favorable reputations? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that consumers won't judge a country's products by its reputation if the products are well-made.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Forced to be bad: When eating that chocolate cake is 'not our fault'?
Imagine you're dining out with a friend who insists on sharing some chocolate cake for dessert. Since the decision has already been made for you, you gladly join in without feeling any regret. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are happier when someone else decides they can indulge in dessert or other guilty pleasures.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Brand loyalty: What happens when our favorite products are unavailable?
What would happen to all those millions of Snickers fans if their favorite chocolate bar was temporarily out of stock? Would they wait for it to be available again or would they quickly switch allegiance to Milky Way or Kit Kat? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when you can't get your favorite product, you'll quickly forget about it if you can find a good replacement.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Marketing Science
Customer experience matters more when economy is strong, research shows
Customers care more about their past experiences with service firms when the economy is doing well, according to a research team from the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University.

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Journal of Sensory Studies
Buffet pricing surprise
Does the price you pay at a buffet influence how much you like the food? Surprisingly, yes! In a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study published in the Journal of Sensory Studies, researchers found that when charged more for an all-you-can-eat buffet diners rated the food higher than when charged less for the same food.

Contact: David Just
drj3@cornell.edu
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Social Psychological and Personality Science
Power isn't enough: Study reveals the missing link for effective leadership
The research, just published in Social Psychological and Personality Science, finds that leaders who fail to take into account their audiences' perspective have a far greater propensity to bungle the issue and conversation.

Contact: Karen Paff
karen.paff@columbia.edu
212-854-2747
Columbia Business School