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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Marketing Science
Customer experience matters more when economy is strong, research shows
Customers care more about their past experiences with service firms when the economy is doing well, according to a research team from the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University.

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Journal of Sensory Studies
Buffet pricing surprise
Does the price you pay at a buffet influence how much you like the food? Surprisingly, yes! In a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study published in the Journal of Sensory Studies, researchers found that when charged more for an all-you-can-eat buffet diners rated the food higher than when charged less for the same food.

Contact: David Just
drj3@cornell.edu
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Social Psychological and Personality Science
Power isn't enough: Study reveals the missing link for effective leadership
The research, just published in Social Psychological and Personality Science, finds that leaders who fail to take into account their audiences' perspective have a far greater propensity to bungle the issue and conversation.

Contact: Karen Paff
karen.paff@columbia.edu
212-854-2747
Columbia Business School

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Can consumers use an easy trick to extend wonderful experiences and shorten bad ones?
Many experiences rarely seem to last the right amount of time. Vacations feel too short, meetings seem too long, and bad dates never seem to end. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that simply categorizing experiences can help consumers extend good experiences and shorten the bad ones.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Lucky loyalty? Devoted consumers believe they have earned the right to win random rewards
Loyal consumers can earn benefits such as frequent flyer miles or free nights at hotels when they participate in rewards programs. Loyalty, of course, doesn't increase the odds of winning random prizes or receiving random discounts. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers who have shown loyalty to a company giving a random reward mistakenly believe they are more likely to receive the reward because they deserve it.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Why are consumers willing to spend more money on ethical products?
What motivates consumers to make ethical choices such as buying clothing not made in a sweat shop, spending more money on fair-trade coffee, and bringing their own bags when they go shopping? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, ethical consumption is motivated by a need for consumers to turn their emotions about unethical practices into action.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Do you always get what you pay for? How consumers mispredict product quality
Consumers are willing to spend thousands of dollars for luxury brand watches such as Rolex and Cartier because they are synonymous with high quality. But does this mean that inexpensive watches made by low-cost rivals must always be low quality? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers mistakenly predict product quality based on quality consistency in other price ranges.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Do ads showing sexy women make male consumers less charitable?
What happens when you use images of sexy women to attract men's attention? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, male consumers who are shown images of sexy women feel less connected to other people and are less likely to purchase products advertised as benefiting others or make charitable contributions.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Newspaper Research Journal
UH study finds print readers recall more than online readers
Readers abandoning print newspapers in favor of online news may want to consider the effect it's having. A study conducted by a researcher at the University of Houston finds those who read printed news publications read more news and also remember more news than those who read news online.

Contact: Melissa Carroll
mcarroll@uh.edu
713-743-8153
University of Houston

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Journal of Public Relations Research
News media losing role as gatekeepers to new 'social mediators' on Twitter, study finds
The US government is doing a better job of communicating on Twitter with people in sensitive areas like the Middle East and North Africa without the participation of media organizations, according to a study co-authored by a University of Georgia researcher.

Contact: Itai Himelboim
itai@uga.edu
612-987-1585
University of Georgia

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
New Media and Society
MU researchers develop more accurate Twitter analysis tools
'Trending' topics on Twitter show the quantity of tweets associated with a specific event but trends only show the highest volume keywords and hashtags, and may not give information about the tweets themselves. Now, using data associated with the Super Bowl and World Series, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed and validated a software program that analyzes event-based tweets and measures the context of tweets rather than just the quantity.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
Gifts that generate gratitude keep customers loyal
They promise us discounts, upgrades and freebies in exchange for our allegiance -- so why are shoppers failing to stay faithful to customer loyalty programs?

Contact: Rob Kidd
rj.kidd@qut.edu.au
07-313-81841
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
A Fortune 500 company is redesigning a popular product using materials that are friendlier to the environment. How will consumers respond to the newly redesigned, 'greener' product? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are more likely to purchase a product if they think helping the environment is not the intended purpose of a product improvement.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure
Loyal customers of a company feel that they are more likely and more deserving than others to win perks from the business -- even those that are randomly given out.

Contact: Rebecca Walker Reczek
Reczek.3@osu.edu
614-247-6433
Ohio State University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Fact or fiction: Which do moviegoers prefer?
Do you feel sadder watching a documentary about war or a drama about a young person dying of cancer? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers mistakenly believe they will have stronger emotional reactions when stories are based on true events rather than fiction.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?
From doing yard work to finishing up the last few classes required for a college degree, consumers struggle to get things done. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, the way consumers think about deadlines can determine whether or not they start tasks and accomplish their goals.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child
Ask any parent raising kids in today's fast-paced society and chances are they would agree that there are only so many hours in the day. Recognizing a need for help, many businesses now offer traditional caregiving services ranging from planning birthday parties to teaching children how to ride a bike. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, by outsourcing traditional parental duties, modern-day parents feel they are ultimately protecting parenthood.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Marketing Science
INFORMS study shows social welfare may fall in a more ethical market
For 'credence services' such as auto-repair, health care, and legal services, the benefit to the customers for the service is difficult to assess before and even after the service. A new study in a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) finds that in a credence services market, when more service providers care about the customer's well-being, society as whole may actually be worse off.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of Marketing Research
Organic vs. paid advertising? Inside the mind of an online browser
New research by Columbia Business School professor Kinshuk Jerath takes a unique look at a consumer's behavior between the keyword search and the point-of-click.

Contact: Karen Paff
karen.paff@columbia.edu
212-854-2747
Columbia Business School

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
International Journal of Web Based Communities
Mums trust mums on the net: Australian study
Facebook groups for mothers are overtaking the traditional mums-and-bubs and playgroup environments as a source of trusted advice, and offers a largely untapped marketing tool for businesses wanting to sell their products, an Australian study has found.

Contact: Sandra Hutchinson
s3.hutchinson@qut.edu.au
61-731-389-449
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Journal of Services Marketing
Researcher finds companies' religious affiliation can buffer negative reactions
While companies like Hobby Lobby and Chick-fil-A are at the forefront of debate over the religious rights of employers, a new study by a Grand Valley State University researcher shows religious affiliation can safeguard companies against negative reactions to store policies.

Contact: Dottie Barnes
barnesdo@gvsu.edu
Grand Valley State University

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Marketing Science
Mid-level scientists most likely to use new research tools, says study in INFORMS journal
Scientists in the middle of the status hierarchy, not those at the top or the bottom, are the first to work with easy-to-use commercial products. They are also the most prone to imitate their prior collaborators' use of such commercial kits. These are among the findings of a study of scientists-as-customers appearing in Marketing Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says
Self-focus plays an important role in how consumers make decisions, says new research from business professor Ravi Mehta.

Contact: Phil Ciciora
pciciora@illinois.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Leadership Quarterly
Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus
Having a wider face helps men when they negotiate for themselves but hurts them when they are negotiating in a situation that requires compromise. Additionally, men who are more attractive are better collaborators compared to less attractive men.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Avoiding buyer's remorse: Is product satisfaction higher when consumers are flush?
According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are less satisfied with what they have purchased with their bottom dollar compared to when they have money in the bank.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals