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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says
Self-focus plays an important role in how consumers make decisions, says new research from business professor Ravi Mehta.

Contact: Phil Ciciora
pciciora@illinois.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Leadership Quarterly
Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus
Having a wider face helps men when they negotiate for themselves but hurts them when they are negotiating in a situation that requires compromise. Additionally, men who are more attractive are better collaborators compared to less attractive men.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Retail pricing strategies: Do consumers prefer deep discounts or everyday low prices?
Sometimes finding the best bang for your buck feels like a wild goose chase. It's hard to know which stores offer the best prices at any given time. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when trying to maximize savings, consumers will choose retailers they believe offer the lowest prices the majority of the time.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Avoiding buyer's remorse: Is product satisfaction higher when consumers are flush?
According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are less satisfied with what they have purchased with their bottom dollar compared to when they have money in the bank.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
I'll have what he's having? How consumers make choices about new products
Have you found yourself at a fancy restaurant trying to impress new friends or in a foreign country and unsure of what to order? Not wanting to appear foolish, you just go along with everyone else. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, we're more likely to copy other people's choices when we lack social acceptance or enough information to make an informed decision.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Empathy or justice: What makes consumers donate more to charity?
Have you ever received a request for help and wondered how deserving the recipients are of your donation? This way of thinking may seem inconsistent with your moral values, especially if you consider yourself an otherwise compassionate and empathic person. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests that moral identity decreases donations when recipients are deemed to be responsible for their plight.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
P90X? Why consumers choose high-effort products
Stuck in traffic? On hold for what seems like an eternity? Consumers often face situations that undermine their feelings of control. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when a person's sense of control is threatened, they are more likely to seek out products that require hard work.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Overdoing it: Multiple perspectives confuse consumers
When it comes to television advertising, simple may be best, says Dr. Yael Steinhart of Tel Aviv University. Her new study reports that multiple angles and perspectives in commercials may actually prevent consumers from forming positive associations about the products. She found this to be particularly true for consumers who imagine using the products themselves in the course of evaluating them.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Why do challenging tasks make consumers believe drugs wear off faster?
Imagine that you have a cup of coffee and sit down to read People magazine. How long do you think the energy boost will last before you reach for another cup? Would you need more caffeine if you tried to read War and Peace? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that consumers wrongly believe that pharmacological products such as coffee and aspirin lose their effectiveness when they engage in more strenuous activities.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
You deserve it! Are consumers more likely to buy unique products when made to feel special?
Graduating from college is an important life event often attributed to being smart and working hard. Many people celebrate this milestone achievement by buying themselves an expensive gift or taking a dream vacation. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that consumers who attribute their successes to internal character traits rather than hard work are more likely to select unique products.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Trying to get kids to eat healthier? Don't tell them veggies are good for them
At some point, most kids will hear that drinking milk helps make their bones strong or that fish is food for the brain. But do these messages foster the idea that if something is good for us, it must surely taste bad? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when children hear about the benefits of healthy food, they're less likely to eat it.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
The nostalgia effect: Do consumers spend more when thinking about the past?
Say you are out clothes shopping and you spot something that brings you back to a special time from your childhood when you were surrounded by friends and family. Suddenly, you find yourself purchasing an expensive shirt that makes you feel like a kid again. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, we're more likely to spend money when we're feeling nostalgic.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Journal of Marketing Research
Smarter ads for smartphones: When they do and don't work
Brands spent $8.4 billion on mobile advertising in 2013, and that number is expected to quadruple to $36 billion by 2017, according to eMarketer. But do mobile display ads -- those tiny banner ads that pop up in your smartphone's web browser -- actually work? Researchers at Columbia Business School have found that, despite their size, mobile ads can have a big effect on consumers who are in the market for certain types of products.

Contact: Karen Paff
karen.paff@columbia.edu
212-854-2747
Columbia Business School

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Marketing Science
Using competitors' brand name as a keyword can backfire, INFORMS study finds
Buying keywords of a popular competitors' brand names on search engines such as Google and Bing can backfire according to a new study in the Articles in Advance section of Marketing Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Underage drinkers overexposed to magazine advertising for the brands they consume
The brands of alcohol popular with underage drinkers also happen to be the ones heavily advertised in magazines that young people read, a new study finds.
NIH/National Instutute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Alicia Samuels
asamuels@jhu.edu
914-720-4635
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Addiction
Alcohol backing raises risk of athletes drinking more
The research, led by Monash University and the University of Manchester has found Alcohol sponsorship and hazardous drinking in UK athletes are linked.
Alcohol Research UK

Contact: Glynis Smalley
glynis.smalley@monash.edu
61-408-027-848
Monash University

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Awareness month spurs web searches for autism
According to a new analysis of web search trends by researchers at Drexel University, Autism Awareness Month in April does appear to drive an increase in Google searches for autism -- by a third over searches in March in recent years. High-profile media coverage including Jenny McCarthy's appearance on The Oprah Winfrey Show and a 5-part series on the The Today Show also correlated with very large peaks in search activity.

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Using multiple pictures in an ad? Different perspectives can confuse consumers
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to see the ocean from a private balcony at a luxury resort? Self-imagery is a powerful marketing tactic and many ads use pictures that help you see yourself using a product or service. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, showing photos from multiple perspectives can have a negative effect on how a person processes the information in an ad.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
When does rude service at luxury stores make consumers go back for more?
For many people, the idea of purchasing a luxury product in a high-end boutique comes with the stigma of snobbery and rude salesclerks. But when they are rejected in real life, a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research reveals that a person's desire for brand affiliation and willingness to purchase and display the item actually increases.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Double standard? The use of performance-enhancing products
When professional athletes are found to be using performance-enhancing drugs, many people consider this an unfair advantage and say they are cheating. But when another person uses the same drug to overcome a disease or behavioral issue, society is more forgiving. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that people are more forgiving when the benefit is personal.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Downside to disaster relief: Why do photos of attractive children backfire?
When it comes to asking a stranger for help, being young, pretty, and the opposite sex greatly improve your odds. But when it comes to children suffering from the likes of natural disaster, poverty, or homelessness, a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research reveals that less attractive children receive more help than their cuter counterparts.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Distorting the past: Why do impulsive consumers forget their past indulgences?
Activities like dieting, saving money, and studying require goal setting and self-control. But even the most disciplined person falls prey to temptation every once in a while. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people who distort past memories of their indulgences are more likely to indulge in the future.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Achieving Your Goals: Does removing yourself from the big picture help?
Consider the case of the adult student attending night school to earn a degree that will result in a better job with higher pay. From sacrificing time with friends and family to missing a relaxing evening watching TV, this type of long-term gain often comes with short-term pain. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people are more likely to achieve their goals and avoid temptations when they are able to remove themselves from the big picture.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Money in the bank: Why does feeling powerful help people save more?
In a materialistic culture, saving money is a challenge many of us face long before our retirement years. While many people think education, upbringing, and self-control are major contributors to a person's savings habits, a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research reveals that people save more when they feel powerful.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Back away, please
According to University of Chicago Booth School of Business Professor Christopher K. Hsee, we still have negative feelings about things that approach us -- even if they objectively are not threatening.

Contact: Susan Guibert
susan.guibert@chicagobooth.edu
773-702-9232
University of Chicago Booth School of Business