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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
New Media and Society
MU researchers develop more accurate Twitter analysis tools
'Trending' topics on Twitter show the quantity of tweets associated with a specific event but trends only show the highest volume keywords and hashtags, and may not give information about the tweets themselves. Now, using data associated with the Super Bowl and World Series, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed and validated a software program that analyzes event-based tweets and measures the context of tweets rather than just the quantity.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
Gifts that generate gratitude keep customers loyal
They promise us discounts, upgrades and freebies in exchange for our allegiance -- so why are shoppers failing to stay faithful to customer loyalty programs?

Contact: Rob Kidd
rj.kidd@qut.edu.au
07-313-81841
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
A Fortune 500 company is redesigning a popular product using materials that are friendlier to the environment. How will consumers respond to the newly redesigned, 'greener' product? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are more likely to purchase a product if they think helping the environment is not the intended purpose of a product improvement.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure
Loyal customers of a company feel that they are more likely and more deserving than others to win perks from the business -- even those that are randomly given out.

Contact: Rebecca Walker Reczek
Reczek.3@osu.edu
614-247-6433
Ohio State University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Fact or fiction: Which do moviegoers prefer?
Do you feel sadder watching a documentary about war or a drama about a young person dying of cancer? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers mistakenly believe they will have stronger emotional reactions when stories are based on true events rather than fiction.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?
From doing yard work to finishing up the last few classes required for a college degree, consumers struggle to get things done. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, the way consumers think about deadlines can determine whether or not they start tasks and accomplish their goals.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child
Ask any parent raising kids in today's fast-paced society and chances are they would agree that there are only so many hours in the day. Recognizing a need for help, many businesses now offer traditional caregiving services ranging from planning birthday parties to teaching children how to ride a bike. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, by outsourcing traditional parental duties, modern-day parents feel they are ultimately protecting parenthood.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Marketing Science
INFORMS study shows social welfare may fall in a more ethical market
For 'credence services' such as auto-repair, health care, and legal services, the benefit to the customers for the service is difficult to assess before and even after the service. A new study in a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) finds that in a credence services market, when more service providers care about the customer's well-being, society as whole may actually be worse off.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of Marketing Research
Organic vs. paid advertising? Inside the mind of an online browser
New research by Columbia Business School professor Kinshuk Jerath takes a unique look at a consumer's behavior between the keyword search and the point-of-click.

Contact: Karen Paff
karen.paff@columbia.edu
212-854-2747
Columbia Business School

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
International Journal of Web Based Communities
Mums trust mums on the net: Australian study
Facebook groups for mothers are overtaking the traditional mums-and-bubs and playgroup environments as a source of trusted advice, and offers a largely untapped marketing tool for businesses wanting to sell their products, an Australian study has found.

Contact: Sandra Hutchinson
s3.hutchinson@qut.edu.au
61-731-389-449
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Journal of Services Marketing
Researcher finds companies' religious affiliation can buffer negative reactions
While companies like Hobby Lobby and Chick-fil-A are at the forefront of debate over the religious rights of employers, a new study by a Grand Valley State University researcher shows religious affiliation can safeguard companies against negative reactions to store policies.

Contact: Dottie Barnes
barnesdo@gvsu.edu
Grand Valley State University

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Marketing Science
Mid-level scientists most likely to use new research tools, says study in INFORMS journal
Scientists in the middle of the status hierarchy, not those at the top or the bottom, are the first to work with easy-to-use commercial products. They are also the most prone to imitate their prior collaborators' use of such commercial kits. These are among the findings of a study of scientists-as-customers appearing in Marketing Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says
Self-focus plays an important role in how consumers make decisions, says new research from business professor Ravi Mehta.

Contact: Phil Ciciora
pciciora@illinois.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Leadership Quarterly
Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus
Having a wider face helps men when they negotiate for themselves but hurts them when they are negotiating in a situation that requires compromise. Additionally, men who are more attractive are better collaborators compared to less attractive men.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Retail pricing strategies: Do consumers prefer deep discounts or everyday low prices?
Sometimes finding the best bang for your buck feels like a wild goose chase. It's hard to know which stores offer the best prices at any given time. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when trying to maximize savings, consumers will choose retailers they believe offer the lowest prices the majority of the time.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Avoiding buyer's remorse: Is product satisfaction higher when consumers are flush?
According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are less satisfied with what they have purchased with their bottom dollar compared to when they have money in the bank.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
I'll have what he's having? How consumers make choices about new products
Have you found yourself at a fancy restaurant trying to impress new friends or in a foreign country and unsure of what to order? Not wanting to appear foolish, you just go along with everyone else. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, we're more likely to copy other people's choices when we lack social acceptance or enough information to make an informed decision.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Empathy or justice: What makes consumers donate more to charity?
Have you ever received a request for help and wondered how deserving the recipients are of your donation? This way of thinking may seem inconsistent with your moral values, especially if you consider yourself an otherwise compassionate and empathic person. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests that moral identity decreases donations when recipients are deemed to be responsible for their plight.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
P90X? Why consumers choose high-effort products
Stuck in traffic? On hold for what seems like an eternity? Consumers often face situations that undermine their feelings of control. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when a person's sense of control is threatened, they are more likely to seek out products that require hard work.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Overdoing it: Multiple perspectives confuse consumers
When it comes to television advertising, simple may be best, says Dr. Yael Steinhart of Tel Aviv University. Her new study reports that multiple angles and perspectives in commercials may actually prevent consumers from forming positive associations about the products. She found this to be particularly true for consumers who imagine using the products themselves in the course of evaluating them.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Why do challenging tasks make consumers believe drugs wear off faster?
Imagine that you have a cup of coffee and sit down to read People magazine. How long do you think the energy boost will last before you reach for another cup? Would you need more caffeine if you tried to read War and Peace? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that consumers wrongly believe that pharmacological products such as coffee and aspirin lose their effectiveness when they engage in more strenuous activities.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
You deserve it! Are consumers more likely to buy unique products when made to feel special?
Graduating from college is an important life event often attributed to being smart and working hard. Many people celebrate this milestone achievement by buying themselves an expensive gift or taking a dream vacation. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that consumers who attribute their successes to internal character traits rather than hard work are more likely to select unique products.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Trying to get kids to eat healthier? Don't tell them veggies are good for them
At some point, most kids will hear that drinking milk helps make their bones strong or that fish is food for the brain. But do these messages foster the idea that if something is good for us, it must surely taste bad? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when children hear about the benefits of healthy food, they're less likely to eat it.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
The nostalgia effect: Do consumers spend more when thinking about the past?
Say you are out clothes shopping and you spot something that brings you back to a special time from your childhood when you were surrounded by friends and family. Suddenly, you find yourself purchasing an expensive shirt that makes you feel like a kid again. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, we're more likely to spend money when we're feeling nostalgic.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Journal of Marketing Research
Smarter ads for smartphones: When they do and don't work
Brands spent $8.4 billion on mobile advertising in 2013, and that number is expected to quadruple to $36 billion by 2017, according to eMarketer. But do mobile display ads -- those tiny banner ads that pop up in your smartphone's web browser -- actually work? Researchers at Columbia Business School have found that, despite their size, mobile ads can have a big effect on consumers who are in the market for certain types of products.

Contact: Karen Paff
karen.paff@columbia.edu
212-854-2747
Columbia Business School