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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Bar attendance supports heavy drinking by young adults in the US-Mexico border region
Mexico is a nearby destination where younger US residents can legally drink heavily. However, high levels of drinking on the US side are not always linked to recent travel to Mexico. New findings show that higher levels of drinking among US-Mexico border youth are closely linked to their patterns of bar attendance, but not to how they think about drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Britain A. Mills
britain.mills@utsouthwestern.edu
817-677-8557
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Public Understanding of Science
Blinded by science
Your faith in science may actually make you more likely to trust information that appears scientific but really doesn't tell you much. According to a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study, including trivial elements such as graphs or formulas in product information can lead consumers to believe products are more effective. 'Anything that looks scientific can make information you read a lot more convincing,' says the study's lead author Aner Tal, Ph.D.

Contact: Aner Tal
at425@cornell.edu
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Marketing Science
Product placement can curb TV commercial audience loss by more than 10 percent: INFORMS study
Coordinating product placement with advertising in the same television program can reduce audience loss over commercial breaks by 10 percent, according to a new study in the Articles in Advance section of Marketing Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
International Computer Music Association 2014
New way of syncing music to video will revolutionize TV ads
A University of Huddersfield researcher has shown that tiny tweaks to the soundtrack can make TV adverts much more memorable, increasing their commercial impact.

Contact: Nicola Werritt
n.c.werritt@hud.ac.uk
01-484-473-315
University of Huddersfield

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health
Social trust eroded in Chinese product-tampering incident
For about a decade, Chinese consumers weren't getting what they paid for when they purchased Wuchang, a special brand of gourmet rice that has a peculiar scent. The quality was being diluted when less expensive rice was aromatized, added to the packages of the high-quality rice, and sold at the premium price. Researchers at the University of Illinois studied how the tampering scandal affected the public's perception of risk and their subsequent behavior.

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
The Costco effect: Do consumers buy less variety at bigger stores?
Do consumers make the same choices when products such as beer, soft drinks, or candy bars are sold individually or in bundles? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers purchase a greater variety of products when they are packaged individually rather than bundled together.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Feeling guilty or ashamed? Think about your emotions before you shop
Suppose you grabbed a few cookies before heading out to the grocery store and start to feel guilty or ashamed about breaking your diet. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, feeling guilty might find you comparing calories in different cartons of ice cream. Feeling ashamed might keep you from buying any ice cream in the first place.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Marketing an innovative new product? An exciting product launch could hurt sales
Should every successful product launch involve some sort of dazzling spectacle? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research tells us that this might be a great way to market an upgrade, but a flashy launch could backfire if a new product is truly innovative.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Country of origin: Are negative stereotypes always bad for business?
Consumers worldwide associate France with fashion and luxury and are willing to pay a lot for French luxury products such as perfume and wine. But what about products made in countries with less favorable reputations? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that consumers won't judge a country's products by its reputation if the products are well-made.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Forced to be bad: When eating that chocolate cake is 'not our fault'?
Imagine you're dining out with a friend who insists on sharing some chocolate cake for dessert. Since the decision has already been made for you, you gladly join in without feeling any regret. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are happier when someone else decides they can indulge in dessert or other guilty pleasures.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Brand loyalty: What happens when our favorite products are unavailable?
What would happen to all those millions of Snickers fans if their favorite chocolate bar was temporarily out of stock? Would they wait for it to be available again or would they quickly switch allegiance to Milky Way or Kit Kat? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when you can't get your favorite product, you'll quickly forget about it if you can find a good replacement.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Marketing Science
Customer experience matters more when economy is strong, research shows
Customers care more about their past experiences with service firms when the economy is doing well, according to a research team from the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University.

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Journal of Sensory Studies
Buffet pricing surprise
Does the price you pay at a buffet influence how much you like the food? Surprisingly, yes! In a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study published in the Journal of Sensory Studies, researchers found that when charged more for an all-you-can-eat buffet diners rated the food higher than when charged less for the same food.

Contact: David Just
drj3@cornell.edu
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Social Psychological and Personality Science
Power isn't enough: Study reveals the missing link for effective leadership
The research, just published in Social Psychological and Personality Science, finds that leaders who fail to take into account their audiences' perspective have a far greater propensity to bungle the issue and conversation.

Contact: Karen Paff
karen.paff@columbia.edu
212-854-2747
Columbia Business School

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Can consumers use an easy trick to extend wonderful experiences and shorten bad ones?
Many experiences rarely seem to last the right amount of time. Vacations feel too short, meetings seem too long, and bad dates never seem to end. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that simply categorizing experiences can help consumers extend good experiences and shorten the bad ones.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Lucky loyalty? Devoted consumers believe they have earned the right to win random rewards
Loyal consumers can earn benefits such as frequent flyer miles or free nights at hotels when they participate in rewards programs. Loyalty, of course, doesn't increase the odds of winning random prizes or receiving random discounts. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers who have shown loyalty to a company giving a random reward mistakenly believe they are more likely to receive the reward because they deserve it.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Why are consumers willing to spend more money on ethical products?
What motivates consumers to make ethical choices such as buying clothing not made in a sweat shop, spending more money on fair-trade coffee, and bringing their own bags when they go shopping? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, ethical consumption is motivated by a need for consumers to turn their emotions about unethical practices into action.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Do you always get what you pay for? How consumers mispredict product quality
Consumers are willing to spend thousands of dollars for luxury brand watches such as Rolex and Cartier because they are synonymous with high quality. But does this mean that inexpensive watches made by low-cost rivals must always be low quality? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers mistakenly predict product quality based on quality consistency in other price ranges.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Do ads showing sexy women make male consumers less charitable?
What happens when you use images of sexy women to attract men's attention? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, male consumers who are shown images of sexy women feel less connected to other people and are less likely to purchase products advertised as benefiting others or make charitable contributions.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Newspaper Research Journal
UH study finds print readers recall more than online readers
Readers abandoning print newspapers in favor of online news may want to consider the effect it's having. A study conducted by a researcher at the University of Houston finds those who read printed news publications read more news and also remember more news than those who read news online.

Contact: Melissa Carroll
mcarroll@uh.edu
713-743-8153
University of Houston

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Journal of Public Relations Research
News media losing role as gatekeepers to new 'social mediators' on Twitter, study finds
The US government is doing a better job of communicating on Twitter with people in sensitive areas like the Middle East and North Africa without the participation of media organizations, according to a study co-authored by a University of Georgia researcher.

Contact: Itai Himelboim
itai@uga.edu
612-987-1585
University of Georgia

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
New Media and Society
MU researchers develop more accurate Twitter analysis tools
'Trending' topics on Twitter show the quantity of tweets associated with a specific event but trends only show the highest volume keywords and hashtags, and may not give information about the tweets themselves. Now, using data associated with the Super Bowl and World Series, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed and validated a software program that analyzes event-based tweets and measures the context of tweets rather than just the quantity.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
Gifts that generate gratitude keep customers loyal
They promise us discounts, upgrades and freebies in exchange for our allegiance -- so why are shoppers failing to stay faithful to customer loyalty programs?

Contact: Rob Kidd
rj.kidd@qut.edu.au
07-313-81841
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
A Fortune 500 company is redesigning a popular product using materials that are friendlier to the environment. How will consumers respond to the newly redesigned, 'greener' product? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are more likely to purchase a product if they think helping the environment is not the intended purpose of a product improvement.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure
Loyal customers of a company feel that they are more likely and more deserving than others to win perks from the business -- even those that are randomly given out.

Contact: Rebecca Walker Reczek
Reczek.3@osu.edu
614-247-6433
Ohio State University