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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds
Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at UC Irvine and UC Merced.
National Science Foundation, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Rico
lrico@uci.edu
949-824-9055
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA begins hurricane mission with Global Hawk flight to Cristobal
The first of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, on Aug. 27 after surveying Hurricane Cristobal for the first science flight of NASA's latest hurricane airborne mission.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Snowfall in a warmer world
A study finds big snowstorms will still occur in the Northern Hemisphere following global warming.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Veld Fires in South Africa
South Africa is entering what is described by the Volunteer Wildfire Services of South Africa as 'Cape Fire Season.' The Eastern Cape provincial government warned residents in certain parts of the province on Monday of strong winds and veld fires.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Geology
Pacific plate shrinking as it cools
The Pacific tectonic plate is not as rigid as scientists believe, according to new calculations by researchers at Rice University and the University of Nevada, Reno.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Happy Camp and July Fire Complexes in California
As of seven hours ago the Happy Camp Complex of fires had consumed 24,939 acres of land in Northern California, the July complex had consumed 35,530 as of eight hours ago.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Coal's continued dominance must be made more vivid in climate change accounting
The world's accounting system for carbon emissions, run by the United Nations, disregards capital investments in future coal-fired and natural-gas power plants that will commit the world to several decades and billions of tons of greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study from Princeton University and the University of California-Irvine.

Contact: Morgan Kelly, Princeton Office of Communications
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Fires in Western Australia
According to the Department of Fire and Emergency Services of Western Australia, a bushfire ADVICE remains for people traveling along Great Northern Highway approximately 20 kilometers east of Broome, and Cape Leveque Road approximately 40 kilometers north of Broome, in the Shire of Broome.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Fires above the Great Slave Lake in Canada
Updates from NWTfire.com report that there are 133 active fires in the North Slave Region of the Northwest Territories. No new fires reported in the past 24 hours. Fire danger is moderate to high. Smoke may be an issue in some communities.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Happy Camper and July fire complexes in California
The Happy Camp and July Fire Complex can both be seen in this Aqua satellite image from Aug. 23, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Despite a significant reduction in smog-producing toxins, the Greater Toronto Area still violates Canada's standards for ozone air pollution
A new study shows that while the Greater Toronto Area has significantly reduced some of the toxins that contribute to smog, the city continues to violate the Canada-wide standards for ozone air pollution.

Contact: Kim Luke
kim.luke@utoronto.ca
416-978-4352
University of Toronto

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
NASA scientists watching, studying Arctic changes this summer
As we near the final month of summer in the Northern Hemisphere, NASA scientists are watching the annual seasonal melting of the Arctic sea ice cover. The floating, frozen cap that stretches across the Arctic Ocean shrinks throughout summer until beginning to regrow, typically around mid-September.
NASA

Contact: Patrick Lynch
Patrick.lynch@nasa.gov
301-286-3854
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Arctic sea ice influenced force of the Gulf Stream
The force of the Gulf Stream was significantly influenced by the sea ice situation in the Fram Strait in the past 30,000 years. On the basis of biomarkers in deposits on the seafloor, geologists from the Alfred Wegener Institute managed for the first time to reconstruct when and how the marine region between Greenland and Svalbard was covered with ice in the past and in what way the Gulf Stream reacted when the sea ice cover suddenly broke up.

Contact: Sina Loeschke
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12008
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Sunlight, not microbes, key to CO2 in Arctic
The vast reservoir of carbon stored in Arctic permafrost is gradually being converted to carbon dioxide after entering the freshwater system in a process thought to be controlled largely by microbial activity. However, researchers say that sunlight and not bacteria is the key to triggering the production of CO2 from material released by Arctic soils.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Crump
bcrump@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4369
Oregon State University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Severe drought is causing the western US to rise
The severe drought gripping the western United States in recent years is changing the landscape well beyond localized effects of water restrictions and browning lawns. Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have used GPS data to discover that the growing, broad-scale loss of water is causing the entire western US to rise up like an uncoiled spring.
USGS National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
BMC Public Health
Climate change could see dengue fever come to Europe
Dengue fever could make headway in popular European holiday destinations if climate change continues on its predicted trajectory, according to research published in open-access journal BMC Public Health.

Contact: Shane Canning
44-203-192-2429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Sunlight controls the fate of carbon released from thawing Arctic permafrost
Just how much Arctic permafrost will thaw in the future and how fast heat-trapping carbon dioxide will be released from those warming soils is a topic of lively debate among climate scientists.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bernie DeGroat
bernied@umich.edu
734-647-1847
University of Michigan

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate
Humans are increasingly dependent on algae, too, to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are driving the life-and-death dynamics of the algae's blooms, even when all else stays essentially the same, and this has important implications for our climate.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Ozone-depleting compound persists, NASA research shows
NASA research shows Earth's atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of an ozone-depleting compound from an unknown source decades after the compound was banned worldwide.
NASA

Contact: Kathryn Hansen
kathryn.h.hansen@nasa.gov
301-286-1046
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Beaver complex and July complex wildfires in California
Beaver complex and July complex fires are seen in this Terra image from Aug. 19, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Signs of deforestation in Brazil
Multiple fires are visible in in this image of the Para and Mato Grosso states of Brazil. Many of these were most likely intentionally set in order to deforest the land.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Nature
Has the puzzle of rapid climate change in the last ice age been solved?
The cold period of the last ice age was repeatedly interrupted by much warmer climate conditions. Scientists have long attempted to find out why these drastic temperature jumps of up to ten degrees took place within just a few decades. Now a group of researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute has been able to reconstruct these climate changes, using a series of model simulations. The surprising finding is that minor variations in the ice sheet size can be sufficient to trigger abrupt climate changes.

Contact: Sina Loeschke
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12008
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
International Journal of Climatology
UM research improves temperature modeling across mountainous landscapes
New research by University of Montana doctoral student Jared Oyler provides improved computer models for estimating temperature across mountainous landscapes.
USGeological Survey North Central Climate Science Center, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jared Oyler
jared.oyler@ntsg.umt.edu
406-243-6311
The University of Montana

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
No one-size-fits-all approach in a changing climate, changing land
As climate change alters habitats for birds and bees and everything in between, so too does the way humans decide to use land. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Aarhus University in Denmark have, for the first time, found a way to determine the potential combined impacts of both climate and land-use change on plants, animals and ecosystems across the country.
Bryson Climate, People and Environment Program, European Research Council, National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Jack Williams
jwwilliams1@wisc.edu
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Ecology Letters
Butterflies' evolutionary responses to warmer temperatures may compromise their ability to adapt to future climate change
Members of the brown argus butterfly species that moved north in response to recent climate change have evolved a narrower diet dependent on wild Geranium plants, UK researchers report. However, butterflies that did not move north have more diverse diets, including plants such as Rockrose that are abundant in southern parts of the UK.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley