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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot
New research from University of California Davis and Aarhus University in Denmark shows that high mantle temperatures miles beneath the Earth's surface are essential for generating large amounts of magma. In fact, the scientists found that Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano lies directly above the hottest portion of the North Atlantic mantle plume.
National Science Foundation, Danish National Research Foundation

Contact: Charles Lesher
celesher@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA HS3 mission Global Hawk's bullseye in Hurricane Edouard
NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission flew the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft on two missions between Sept. 11 and 15 into Hurricane Edouard and scored a bullseye by gathering information in the eye of the strengthening storm. Scientists saw how upper-level wind shear was affecting Edouard on the HS3's Global Hawk flight of the 2014 campaign over Sept. 11 and 12, and saw the hurricane strengthen during the sixth flight on Sept. 15 and 16.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science
Researchers from Princeton University and other institutions may have hit upon an answer to a climate-change puzzle that has eluded scientists for years, namely why glaciers in the Karakoram range of the Himalayas have remained stable and even increased in mass while glaciers nearby and worldwide have been receding. Understanding the 'Karakoram anomaly' could help gauge the future availability of water for hundreds of millions of people.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Recently discovered microbe is key player in climate change
Scientists have discovered how an invisible menagerie of microbes in permafrost soils acts as global drivers of Earth processes such as climate via gas exchange between soils and the atmosphere. These findings will help climate modelers more accurately predict Earth's future climate.
Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research, UA Technology and Research Initiative Fund

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Water Resources Research
This week from AGU: Rainfall and landslide risk, lava lake, winds hasten glacial melting
This week, the American Geophysical Union is publishing articles about rainfall and landslide risk, lava lakes, and how winds hasten glacial melting.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
When the isthmus is an island: Madison's hottest, and coldest, spots
In a new study published this month in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers highlight the urban heat island effect in Madison: the city's concentrated asphalt, brick and concrete lead to higher temperatures than its nonurban surroundings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Schatz
jschatz2@wisc.edu
608-263-1859
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
NASA's HS3 mission continues with flights over Hurricane Gonzalo
Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthened into a hurricane on Oct. 14 when it was near Puerto Rico and provided a natural laboratory for the next phase of NASA's HS3 or Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Fires in the Egypt River Delta
A NASA satellite has detected a fire in the Egyptian River Delta.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Mediterranean, semi-arid ecosystems prove resistant to climate change
Climate change predictions for the Middle East, like other arid regions of the world, are alarming. But in testing these dire predictions, Tel Aviv University ecologists found that, contrary to expectations, no measurable changes in annual vegetation could be seen. None of the crucial vegetation characteristics -- neither species richness and composition, nor density and biomass -- had changed appreciably in the course of the rainfall manipulations.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
NASA study finds 1934 had worst drought of last thousand years
A new study using a reconstruction of North American drought history over the last 1,000 years found that the drought of 1934 was the driest and most widespread of the last millennium.
NASA

Contact: Ellen Gray
ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov
301-286-1950
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
NASA begins sixth year of airborne Antarctic ice change study
NASA is carrying out its sixth consecutive year of Operation IceBridge research flights over Antarctica to study changes in the continent's ice sheet, glaciers and sea ice. This year's airborne campaign, which began its first flight Thursday morning, will revisit a section of the Antarctic ice sheet that recently was found to be in irreversible decline.
NASA

Contact: George Hale
George.r.hale@nasa.gov
301-614-5853
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists find ancient mountains that fed early life
Scientists have found a huge mountain range in Gondwana, 600 million years ago. It ran from modern west Africa to northeast Brazil, and as it eroded it fed the oceans with nutrients that fueled an explosion of early life on Earth.

Contact: Daniela Rubatto
Daniela.rubatto@anu.edu.au
61-261-255-157
Australian National University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
NASA study finds 1934 had worst drought of last thousand years
A new study using a reconstruction of North American drought history over the last 1,000 years found that the drought of 1934 was the driest and most widespread of the last millennium.
NASA

Contact: Ellen Gray
Ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov
301-286-1950
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Paleoceanography
Microfossils reveal warm oceans had less oxygen, Syracuse geologists say
Researchers in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences are pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology -- the study of tiny fossilized organisms -- to better understand how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago. Their findings are the subject of an article in the journal Paleoceanography.

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Prescribed burns in Western Australia
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite detected fires burning in Western Australia on Oct. 14, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Fires dot the Ukraine countryside
Numerous fires (marked with red dots) are burning in the Ukraine, likely as a result of regional agricultural practices.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
1934 drought was worst of the last millennium, study finds
The 1934 drought was worst of the last millennium, a study finds.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Palaeogeoraphy, Palaeocilmatology, Palaeoecology
Past climate change and continental ice melt linked to varying CO2 levels
Scientists at the Universities of Southampton and Cardiff have discovered that a globally warm period in Earth's geological past featured highly variable levels of CO2.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
0238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Rising sea levels of 1.8 meters in worst-case scenario
The climate is getting warmer, the ice sheets are melting and sea levels are rising -- but how much? The IPCC-report in 2013 was not able to come up with an upper limit for sea level rise within this century. Now researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute and colleagues have calculated the risk for a worst-case scenario. The results indicate that at worst, the sea level would rise a maximum of 1.8 meters.

Contact: Gertie Skaarup
skaarup@nbi.dk
45-29-75-06-20
University of Copenhagen - Niels Bohr Institute

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
NASA's GPM satellite's find before Hurricane Simon was caught rapidly intensifying
Hurricane Simon appeared to be keeping a secret before it rapidly intensified on Oct. 4, but the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM satellite was able uncover it.
NASA, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Antarctic sea ice reaches new record maximum
Sea ice surrounding Antarctica reached a new record high extent this year, covering more of the southern oceans than it has since scientists began a long-term satellite record to map the extent in the late 1970s.
NASA, National Snow and Ice Data Center

Contact: Patrick Lynch
patrick.lynch@nasa.gov
301-286-3854
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Vongfong leaving the Mariana Islands
Typhoon Vongfong has exited the Mariana Islands. Now, as the island of Iwo To begins recovery from Typhoon Phanfone, NASA's Aqua satellite is eyeing Typhoon Vongfong over 1,000 miles south of Iwo To. Although Vongfong is expected to turn north toward Iwo To, it is forecast to stay west of the island on its track.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
NASA spots Typhoon Phanfone affecting Japan
Over the weekend of Oct. 5 and 6, Typhoon Phanfone's center made landfall just south of Tokyo and passed over the city before exiting back into the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of the typhoon as Tokyo braced for its large eye.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Tropical Storm Simon says, 'US Southwest is an arm's reach'
Infrared satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows what looks like an arm from Tropical Storm Simon's northern quadrant, reaching over Baja California to mainland Mexico. Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center noted that Simon is just an 'arm's reach' to the southern US and expect rainfall and rough surf to affect that area of the country.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center