EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
2-Oct-2014 13:25
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Mathematics


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Nature
Spiders: Survival of the fittest group
Theorists have long debated the existence and power of a type of evolution called group selection. Now, studying social spiders, two scientists have uncovered the first-ever experimental evidence of group selection driving collective traits in wild populations of these spiders.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Ecology Letters
New approach can predict impact of climate change on species that can't get out of the way
When scientists talk about the consequences of climate change, it can mean more than how we human beings will be impacted by higher temperatures, rising seas and serious storms. Plants and trees are also feeling the change, but they can't move out of the way. Researchers have developed a new tool to overcome a major challenge of predicting how organisms may respond to climate change.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Systematic Biology
Research confirms controversial Darwin theory of 'jump dispersal'
More than one hundred and fifty years ago, Charles Darwin hypothesized that species could cross oceans and other vast distances on vegetation rafts, icebergs, or in the case of plant seeds, in the plumage of birds. Though many were skeptical of Darwin's 'jump dispersal' idea, a new study suggests that Darwin might have been correct.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Breakthrough study discovers 6 changing faces of 'global killer' bacteria
University of Leicester researchers unlock vital new information to improve vaccinations against pneumococcus infection.
European Commission, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund

Contact: Marco Oggioni
mro5@leicester.ac.uk
44-116-252-2261
University of Leicester

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Adding uncertainty to improve mathematical models
Mathematicians from Brown University have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Soft Matter
At the interface of math and science
In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas -- often behind the scenes.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell
How the ends of chromosomes are maintained for cancer cell immortality
Maintaining telomeres is a requisite feature of cells that are able to continuously divide and also a hallmark of human cancer. Telomeres are much like the plastic cap on the ends of shoelaces -- they keep the ends of DNA from fraying. In a new study published this week in Cell, researchers describe a mechanism for how cancer cells take over one of the processes for telomere maintenance to gain an infinite lifespan.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute for General Medical Sciences, Abramson Cancer Research Institute, Basser Research Center for BRCA

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Language
New linguistic tools can predict your dialect characteristics
A new linguistic study may make it possible to more accurately predict the dialect features people use based on their demographic characteristics and where they live. In a new article published in the September 2014 issue of Language, Martijn Wieling and colleagues used statistical modeling techniques to predict whether speakers in Tuscany use words from standard Italian or words unique to local dialects.

Contact: Brice Russ
bruss@lsadc.org
336-908-1036
Linguistic Society of America

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Surveys may assess language more than attitudes, says study involving CU-Boulder
Scientists who study patterns in survey results might be dealing with data on language rather than what they're really after -- attitudes -- according to an international study involving the University of Colorado Boulder.

Contact: Kai Larsen
kai.larsen@colorado.edu
720-938-2436
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Could suburban sprawl be good for segregation?
Racially and economically mixed cities are more likely to stay integrated if the density of households stays low, finds a new analysis of a now-famous model of segregation. By simulating the movement of families between neighborhoods in a virtual 'city,' Duke University mathematicians show that cities are more likely to become segregated along racial, ethnic or other lines when the proportion of occupied sites rises above a certain critical threshold -- as low as 25 percent.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Computers for Biology and Medicine
New hope for beloved family pets
University of Leicester researchers work with Avacta Animal Health Ltd to develop novel system for diagnosing lymphoma in dogs.
Avacta Animal Health Ltd, East Midlands European Regional Development Fund

Contact: Professor Alexander Gorban
ag153@le.ac.uk
01-162-231-433
University of Leicester

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
SIAM/ASA Journal on Uncertainty Quantification
Where is that spacecraft?
Space surveillance is inherently challenging when compared to other tracking environments due to various reasons, not least of which is the long time gap between surveillance updates. In a paper published in July in the SIAM/ASA Journal on Uncertainty Quantification, authors Horwood and Aubrey Poore, both of Numerica Corporation, propose a more statistically rigorous treatment of uncertainty in the near-Earth space environment than currently available.
Phase II STTR, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Karthika Muthukumaraswamy
karthika@siam.org
267-350-6383
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Methods
Program predicts placement of chemical tags that control gene activity
Biochemists have developed a program that predicts the placement of chemical marks that control the activity of genes based on sequences of DNA. By comparing sequences with and without epigenomic modification, they identified DNA motifs associated with the changes. They call this novel analysis pipeline Epigram and have made both the program and the DNA motifs they identified openly available to other scientists.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Susan Brown
scinews@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Cancer Cell
New cancer drug target involving lipid chemical messengers
More than half of human cancers have abnormally upregulated chemical signals related to lipid metabolism, yet how these signals are controlled during tumor formation is not fully understood. Researchers report that TIPE3, a newly described oncogenic protein, promotes cancer by targeting these pathways.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
PLOS Currents: Outbreaks
Research predicts possible 6,800 new Ebola cases this month
Arizona State University and Harvard University researchers also discovered through modelling analysis that the rate of rise in cases significantly increased in August in Liberia and Guinea, around the time that a mass quarantine was put in place, indicating that the mass quarantine efforts may have made the outbreak worse than it would have been otherwise.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology
Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control
University of Washington engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that lets users 'train' their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.
University of Washington

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing
New Dartmouth smartphone app reveals users' mental health, performance, behavior
Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues have built the first smartphone app that automatically reveals college students' mental health, academic performance and behavioral trends. In other words, your smartphone knows your state of mind -- even if you don't -- and how that affects you. The StudentLife app, which compares students' happiness, stress, depression and loneliness to their academic performance, also may be used in the general population -- for example, to monitor mental health, trigger intervention and improve productivity in workplace employees.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Pupil size shows reliability of decisions
The precision with which people make decisions can be predicted by measuring pupil size before they are presented with any information about the decision, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational Biology this week.

Contact: Peter Murphy
p.murphy@fsw.leidenuniv.nl
071-527-3874
PLOS

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
World population to keep growing this century, hit 11 billion by 2100
The chance that world population in 2100 will be between 9.6 billion and 12.3 billion people is 80 percent, according to the first such United Nations forecast to incorporate modern statistical tools.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Advances in Water Resources
Nile River monitoring influences northeast Africa's future
Curtin University research that monitors the volume of water in the Nile River Basin will help to level the playing field for more than 200 million northeast Africans who rely on the river's water supply.

Contact: Vicki Brett
vicki.brett@curtin.edu.au
61-401-103-755
Curtin University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Math model designed to replace invasive kidney biopsy for lupus patients
Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Avner Friedman
Friedman.158@osu.edu
614-292-5795
Ohio State University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
eLife
Ebola outbreak 'out of all proportion' and severity cannot be predicted
A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick. Dr. Thomas House, of the University's Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated data from past outbreaks that successfully replicated their eventual scale.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Tom Frew
a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-767-75910
University of Warwick

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
Run, cheetah, run
A new algorithm enables MIT cheetah robot to run and jump, untethered, across grass.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Physics
The science behind swimming
Using simple hydrodynamics, a team of researchers led by Mahadevan was able to show that a handful of principles govern how virtually every animal -- from the tiniest fish to birds to gigantic whales propel themselves though the water.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature
Nature: New drug blocks gene driving cancer growth
When active, the protein called Ral can drive tumor growth and metastasis in several human cancers including pancreatic, prostate, lung, colon and bladder. Unfortunately, drugs that block its activity are not available. A study published today in the journal Nature uses a novel approach to target the activation of these Ral proteins.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver