EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
1-Sep-2014 22:15
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Mathematics


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds
Early, fast, turbulent mixing of gas within giant molecular clouds -- the birthplaces of stars -- means all stars formed from a single cloud bear the same unique chemical 'tag' or 'DNA fingerprint,' write astrophysicists at University of California, Santa Cruz, reporting on the results of computational simulations in the journal Nature, published online on Aug. 31, 2014. Could such chemical tags help astronomers identify our own Sun's long-lost sibling stars?
National Science Foundation, NASA, University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Contact: Mark Krumholz
mkrumhol@ucsc.edu
510-761-2929
University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
European Physical Journal B
Inter-dependent networks stress test
Energy production systems are good examples of complex systems. Their infrastructure equipment requires ancillary sub-systems structured like a network -- including water for cooling, transport to supply fuel, and ICT systems for control and management. Every step in the network chain is interconnected with a wider network and they are all mutually dependent. Gaihua Fu and colleagues have studied various aspects of inter-network dependencies, not previously explored, and their findings have been published in EPJ B.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Canadians rank highly when it comes to public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement
A new expert panel report, Science Culture: Where Canada Stands, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies, helps to paint the clearest picture of Canada's science culture and science culture support system in 25 years. The expert panel who conducted the assessment found Canadians excel in public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement; however they also determined there is room for improvement in some areas, including skills development.

Contact: Cathleen Meechan
cathleen.meechan@scienceadvice.ca
613-567-5000 x228
Council of Canadian Academies

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Scientists plug into a learning brain
Scientists explored the brain's capacity to learn and found learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing
New smartphone app can detect newborn jaundice in minutes
University of Washington engineers and physicians have developed a smartphone application that checks for jaundice in newborns and can deliver results to parents and pediatricians within minutes.
Coulter Foundation, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Flexing the brain: Why learning tasks can be difficult
Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to an ability we already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve. Scientists from the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition -- a joint program between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh -- have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why this happens.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
Sheepdogs use simple rules to herd sheep
Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Tamera Jones
tane@nerc.ac.uk
07-917-557-215
Natural Environment Research Council

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New process helps overcome obstacles to produce renewable fuels and chemicals
There's an old saying in the biofuels industry: 'You can make anything from lignin except money.' But now, a new study may pave the way to challenging that adage. The study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory demonstrates a concept that provides opportunities for the successful conversion of lignin into a variety of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials for a sustainable energy economy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Marketing Science
INFORMS study shows social welfare may fall in a more ethical market
For 'credence services' such as auto-repair, health care, and legal services, the benefit to the customers for the service is difficult to assess before and even after the service. A new study in a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) finds that in a credence services market, when more service providers care about the customer's well-being, society as whole may actually be worse off.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
European Physical Journal D
Water window imaging opportunity
Ever heard of the water window? It consists of radiations in the 3.3 to 4.4 nanometer range, which are not absorbed by the water in biological tissues. A new theoretical study identifies the physical mechanism needed to efficiently generate harmonic radiations at high laser intensities that occur beyond the saturation threshold of atoms and molecules. These findings, aimed at improving conventional methods of coherent radiation production to reach the water window, were published in EPJ D.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
The ABC's of animal speech: Not so random after all
The calls of many animals, from whales to wolves, might contain more language-like structure than previously thought, according to study that raises new questions about the evolutionary origins of human language.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Transportation Science
Electric vehicle consumers better off with electric range under 100 miles: INFORMS study
Until battery cost is cut down to $100 per kilowatt hour, the majority of US consumers for battery electric vehicles will be better off by choosing an electric vehicle with a range below 100 miles, according to a new study in the Articles in Advance section of Transportation Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 17-Aug-2014
Nature Methods
A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape
With three billion letters in the human genome, it seems hard to believe that adding or removing a base could have much of an effect on our health. Yet, such insertions and deletions can dramatically alter biological function. It is has been difficult to detect these mutations. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists have devised a new way to analyze genome sequences that pinpoints insertions and deletions in people with diseases such as autism, obsessive compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Simons Foundation

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Statistical model predicts performance of hybrid rice
A research team led by plant geneticists at the University of California, Riverside and Huazhong Agricultural University, China, has used 'genomic prediction' to predict the performance of hybrid rice. Genomic prediction is a new technology that could potentially revolutionize hybrid breeding in agriculture. A statistical approach to predicting the value of an economically important trait in a plant, such as yield or disease resistance, the method works if the trait is heritable and reduces costs.
NIH/National Institute of Food and Agriculture, National Natural Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
PLOS Biology
Our ancestor's 'leaky' membrane answers big questions in biology
All life on Earth came from one common ancestor -- a single-celled organism -- but what it looked like, how it lived and how it evolved into today's modern cells is a four-billion-year-old mystery being solved by researchers at UCL using mathematical modeling.

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
Geckos use toe hairs to turn stickiness on/off
If you've ever watched a gecko, you probably wondered about their uncanny ability to adhere to any surface -- including upside down. It turns out the little lizards can turn the 'stickiness' of toe hairs on their feet on and off, which enables them to run at great speeds or cling to ceilings without expending much energy. In the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers describe their work exploring the subtleties of geckos' adhesion system mechanism.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
UbiComp 2014
Rutgers researchers show that how fast you drive might reveal exactly where you are going
Some drivers are letting auto insurance companies monitor their driving habits in return for a premium discount, but these drivers may not know that the information could reveal where they are driving. Rutgers engineers have shown that even without GPS or other location-sensing technology, a driver could reveal where he or she traveled with no more information than a starting location and a steady stream of data that shows how fast the person was driving.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Science
Origami robot folds itself up, crawls away
A prototype made almost entirely of printable parts demonstrates crucial capabilities of reconfigurable robots.
National Science Foundation, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Research at Harvard,Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Sixth International Meeting on Origami in Science, Mathematics and Education
Science
Origami could lead to exotic materials, tiny transformers
Embracing the pleats, creases and tucks of the Japanese art of decorative paper folding, Cornell University researchers are uncovering how origami principles could lead to exotic materials, soft robots and even tiny transformers. Publishing online in the journal Science Aug. 8.

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Science
Small, origami-inspired pop-up robots function autonomously
Inspired by the traditional Japanese art form of origami or 'folding paper,' researchers have developed a way to coax flat sheets of composite materials to self-fold into complex robots that crawl and turn.
National Science Foundation, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Research

Contact: Natasha D. Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
International Journal of Information Quality
Wiki ranking
Wikipedia, the free, online collaborative encyclopedia, is an important source of information. However, while the team of volunteer editors endeavors to maintain high standards, there are occasionally problems with the veracity of content, deliberate vandalism and incomplete entries. Writing in the International Journal of Information Quality, computer scientists in China have devised a software algorithm that can automatically check a particular entry and rank it according to quality.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Nucleic Acids Research
'Treatments waiting to be discovered' inside new database
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the top-ranked journal Nucleic Acids Research describes a database named multiMiR, the most comprehensive database collecting information about microRNAs and their targets.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
Physicists eye neural fly data, find formula for Zipf's law
Physicists have identified a mechanism that may help explain Zipf's law -- a unique pattern of behavior found in disparate systems, including complex biological ones. The journal Physical Review Letters is publishing their mathematical models, which demonstrate how Zipf's law naturally arises when a sufficient number of units react to a hidden variable in a system.

Contact: Megan Terraso McRainey
mterras@emory.edu
404-727-6167
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Marketing Science
Mid-level scientists most likely to use new research tools, says study in INFORMS journal
Scientists in the middle of the status hierarchy, not those at the top or the bottom, are the first to work with easy-to-use commercial products. They are also the most prone to imitate their prior collaborators' use of such commercial kits. These are among the findings of a study of scientists-as-customers appearing in Marketing Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Siggraph
Extracting audio from visual information
Researchers at MIT, Microsoft, and Adobe have developed an algorithm that can reconstruct an audio signal by analyzing minute vibrations of objects depicted in video. In one set of experiments, they were able to recover intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag photographed from 15 feet away through soundproof glass.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology