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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Medical Ethics
Were clinical trial practices in East Germany questionable?
Clinical trials carried out in the former East Germany in the second half of the 20th century were not always with the full knowledge or understanding of participants with some questionable practices taking place, according to a paper published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Social Science Research
The unexpected benefits of adjustable rate mortgages
As would be expected during a time of consumer deleveraging, households applied more than 70 percent of their mortgage savings to reducing outstanding credit card debts. Not only did the lower payments reduce mortgage defaults but credit card delinquencies fell. 'These choices had significant impact on foreclosures, house prices and employment in regions that were more exposed to interest rate declines,' the researchers concluded.

Contact: Susan Guibert
susan.guibert@chicagobooth.edu
773-702-9232
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Child Development
Early intervention could boost education levels
Taking steps from an early age to improve childhood education skills could raise overall population levels of academic achievement by as much as 5 percent, and reduce socioeconomic inequality in education by 15 percent, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Catherine Chittleborough
catherine.chittleborough@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-131-684
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Silencing the speech gene FOXP2 causes breast cancer cells to metastasize
A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has identified an unexpected link between a transcription factor known to regulate speech and language development and metastatic colonization of breast cancer.

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Mathematical model shows how the brain remains stable during learning
Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, UC San Francisco, and Columbia University in New York.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
European Physical Journal D
Quantum holograms as atomic scale memory keepsake
A theoretical model of quantum memory for light, adapting the concept of a hologram to a quantum system has been published in EPJD. The authors demonstrate that it is theoretically possible to retrieve, on demand, a given portion of the stored quantized light signal of a holographic image -- set in a given direction in a given position in time sequence. This is done by shaping the control field both in space and time.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society
Researchers take big-data approach to estimate range of electric vehicles
Researchers have developed new software that estimates how much farther electric vehicles can drive before needing to recharge. The new technique requires drivers to plug in their destination and automatically pulls in data on a host of variables to predict energy use for the vehicle.

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Physics Teacher
Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads
Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Bar attendance supports heavy drinking by young adults in the US-Mexico border region
Mexico is a nearby destination where younger US residents can legally drink heavily. However, high levels of drinking on the US side are not always linked to recent travel to Mexico. New findings show that higher levels of drinking among US-Mexico border youth are closely linked to their patterns of bar attendance, but not to how they think about drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Britain A. Mills
britain.mills@utsouthwestern.edu
817-677-8557
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
User-friendly electronic 'EyeCane' enhances navigational abilities for the blind
Electronic travel aids have the potential to improve navigation for the blind, but early versions had disadvantages that limited widespread adoption. A new ETA, the 'EyeCane,' developed by a team of researchers at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, expands the world of its users, allowing them to better estimate distance, navigate their environment, and avoid obstacles, according to a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience.

Contact: Daphne Watrin
d.watrin@iospress.nl
31-206-883-355
IOS Press

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Mouse model provides new insight in to preeclampsia
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggests that placental cells produce sFLT1 in response to maternal increases in VEGF, resulting in preeclampsia-like symptoms.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Measurement Science and Technology
Measuring on ice: Researchers create 'smart' ice skating blade
An ice skating blade that informs figure skaters of the stresses they are imposing on their joints has been developed by a group of researchers in the US.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Physical Biology
Physicists warning to 'nail beauty fans' applies to animals too
The daily trimming of fingernails and toenails to make them more aesthetically pleasing could be detrimental and potentially lead to serious nail conditions. New research into nail growth, carried out by physicists at The University of Nottingham, will also improve our understanding of disease in the hooves of farm animals and horses.

Contact: Lindsay Brooke
lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk
44-011-595-15751
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Researchers develop personalized ovarian cancer vaccines
Researchers used new genomic analysis techniques to identify specific protein sequences, called epitopes, that the immune system can use to identify cancer cells. Their key insight was that the most effective epitopes to include in a personalized vaccine are not those that react most strongly with the immune system, but rather the epitopes that differ most from the host's normal tissue.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Krieger
kim.krieger@uconn.edu
860-486-0361
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Physical Biology
Physicists sound warning to 'nail beauty fanatics'
The daily trimming of fingernails and toenails to make them more aesthetically pleasing could be detrimental and potentially lead to serious nail conditions.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of Atmospheric Sciences
Weather history time machine
A San Diego State University geography professor, Samuel Shen, and colleagues have developed a software program that allows climate researchers to access historical climate data for the entire global surface (excluding the poles), including the oceans, based on Shen's statistical research into historical climates.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Marketing Science
Product placement can curb TV commercial audience loss by more than 10 percent: INFORMS study
Coordinating product placement with advertising in the same television program can reduce audience loss over commercial breaks by 10 percent, according to a new study in the Articles in Advance section of Marketing Science, a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Contact: Barry List
barry.list@informs.org
443-794-5182
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Nature
A global natural gas boom alone won't slow climate change
A new analysis of global energy use, economics and the climate shows that expanding the current bounty of inexpensive natural gas alone would not slow the growth of global greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, according to a study appearing today in Nature.
Global Technology Strategy Project

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
New forecasting method: Predicting extreme floods in the Andes mountains
Predicting floods following extreme rainfall in the central Andes is enabled by a new method. Climate change has made these events more frequent and more severe in recent decades. Now complex networks analysis of satellite weather data makes it possible to produce a robust warning system for the first time, a study to be published in the journal Nature Communications shows.

Contact: PIK Press Office
press@pik-potsdam.de
49-331-288-2507
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Nature Physics
Researchers say academia can learn from Hollywood
According to a pair of University of Houston professors and their colleague from the IMT Lucca Institute for Advanced Studies in Italy, while science is increasingly moving in the direction of teamwork and interdisciplinary research, changes need to be made in academia to allow for a more collaborative model to flourish. Their findings are published in the October issue of Nature Physics.
National Science Foundation, Italian National Research Council

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
European Physical Journal Plus
Balancing renewable energy costs
Increasing reliance on renewable energies is the way to achieve greater CO2 emission sustainability and energy independence. As such energies are available intermittently and energy cannot be stored easily, most countries aim to combine energy sources. In a new study in EPJ Plus, French scientists present an open source simulation method to calculate the actual cost of relying on a combination of electricity sources, demonstrating that cost is not directly proportional to the demand level.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Eurosurveillance
Ebola research shows rapid control interventions key factor in preventing spread
New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios. Researchers analyzed up-to-date epidemiological data of Ebola cases in Nigeria as of Oct. 1, 2014, in order to estimate the case fatality rate, proportion of health care workers infected, transmission progression and impact of control interventions on the size of the epidemic.

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging
Study finds early signs of heart trouble in obese youth
A study that used two-dimensional echocardiography to closely examine the hearts of 100 children and teens found physical and functional signs of future heart problems already developing in obese children.

Contact: Rachel Cagan
rcagan@acc.org
202-375-6395
American College of Cardiology

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Integrative Biology
Researchers turn computers into powerful allies in the fight against AIDS
The battle against AIDS cannot be won in the laboratory alone. To fight the potentially deadly virus that 34 million people are suffering from we need help from computers. Now research from University of Southern Denmark turns computers into powerful allies in the battle.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Physical Review X
Pressing the accelerator on quantum robotics
Quantum computing will allow for the creation of powerful computers, but also much smarter and more creative robots than conventional ones. This was the conclusion arrived at by researchers from Spain and Austria, who have confirmed that quantum tools help robots learn and respond much faster to the stimuli around them.

Contact: SINC Press Office
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology