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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Stem Cell Reports
NYSCF scientists one step closer to cell therapy for multiple sclerosis patients
For the first time, NYSCF scientists generated induced pluripotent stem cells lines from skin samples of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis and further, they developed an accelerated protocol to induce these stem cells into becoming oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system implicated in multiple sclerosis and many other diseases.

Contact: David McKeon
dmckeon@nyscf.org
212-365-7440
New York Stem Cell Foundation

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Pediatrics
Overweight and obese preschoolers lose more weight when parent is also treated
Primary care treatment of overweight and obese preschoolers works better when treatment targets both parent and child compared to when only the child is targeted.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
BU researchers discover that Klotho is neuroprotective against Alzheimer's disease
Boston University School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to delay or even prevent Alzheimer's disease. They discovered that pre-treatment of neurons with the anti-aging protein Klotho can prevent neuron death in the presence of the toxic amyloid protein and glutamate. These findings currently appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain's dynamic duel underlies win-win choices
People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University. In the study, participants made choices between paired products with different or similar values. Choosing between two items of high value evoked the most positive feelings and the greatest anxiety.

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
609-258-0541
Princeton University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut
A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Korean Ministry of Science

Contact: Weibo Cai
wcai@uwhealth.org
608-262-1749
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Biology Letters
Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research
Research out of York University shows a surprisingly effective way to fight against a certain species of toxic grass fungus: moose saliva -- yes… moose saliva.

Contact: Robin Heron
rheron@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22097
York University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Biomaterials
Antioxidant biomaterial promotes healing
Created by Northwestern University professor Guillermo Ameer and his team, the first-ever inherently antioxidant biomaterial has the potential to prevent failure in medical devices and surgical implants.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Chest
CDC reports annual financial cost of COPD to be $36 billion in the United States
American College of Chest Physicians announced today the online first publication of 'Total and state-specific medical and absenteeism costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults aged ≥18 years in the United States for 2010 and projections through 2020.'

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
A world first: Researchers identify a treatment that prevents tumor metastasis
Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis. Managing to block the metastasis or to prevent their formation would be a giant step towards the fight against cancer. Researchers at Université catholique de Louvain in Belgium successfully performed this world first on models of human tumors in mice. The results of their study were published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports.
European Research Council Starting Grant, Fond de la Recherche Scientifique, Fondation Contre le Cancer

Contact: Prof. Pierre Sonveaux
pierre.sonveaux@uclouvain.be
32-495-251-739
Université catholique de Louvain

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Addiction
Warning: Birthdays can be bad for your health
New research has found that birthday-related drinking is associated with upsurges in hospital admissions among young people. This study of drinking behavior in Ontario, Canada was published online in the scientific journal Addiction.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Immunity
Experiments prove 'stemness' of individual immune memory cells
Researchers in Germany and the US have proven for the first time that specific individual immune cells, termed 'central memory T cells,' have all the essential characteristics of adult tissue stem cells. Such cells can perpetuate themselves indefinitely and generate diverse offspring that can reconstitute "tissue" function. These findings indicate that it should be possible to fully restore specific immunity to pathogens in immunocompromised patients by substitution of small numbers of these T cells.
German Research Foundation, Helmholtz Alliance on Immunotherapy of Cancer, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Vera Siegler
vera.siegler@tum.de
49-892-892-2731
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Chemist develops X-ray vision for quality assurance
A Technical University of Denmark researcher has developed a method that uses X-rays for the rapid identification of substances present in an indeterminate powder. The new technique has the capacity to recognize advanced biological molecules such as proteins. The method therefore has enormous potential in both food production and the pharmaceutical industry, where it opens up new opportunities for the quality assurance of protein-based medicines, for example.

Contact: Christian Grundahl Frankaer
cghar@kemi.dtu.dk
45-45-25-24-69
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
New methods of detecting Salmonella in pork meat processing
Infections caused by food-borne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden. In a PhD project at the National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark, new methods of characterizing and detecting food-borne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing and in bacteria in water, feed and food samples were studied.

Contact: Jeffrey Hoorfar
jhoo@food.dtu.dk
45-35-88-73-79
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
New research: When it hurts to think we were made for each other
Psychologists observe that people talk and think about love in limitless ways but underlying such diversity are some common themes that frame how we think about relationships. For example, one popular frame considers love as perfect unity; in another frame, love is a journey. These two ways of thinking about relationships are particularly interesting because, according to a new study, they have the power to highlight or downplay the damaging effect of conflicts on relationship evaluation.
Drs. Richard Charles and Esther Yewpick Lee Charitable Foundation

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
416-946-3818
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
BMJ Open
Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance
Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery. This is just one of several recommendations made in a report published today, led by researchers at the University of Bristol.
National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Less than 1 percent of UK public research funding spent on antibiotic research in past 5 years
Less than 1 percent of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.
Medical Research Council, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, National Institute for Health Research, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Laura Piddock
l.j.v.piddock@bham.ac.uk
44-012-141-45134
The Lancet

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Researchers discover new way to determine cancer risk of chemicals
A new study has shown that it is possible to predict long-term cancer risk from a chemical exposure by measuring the short-term effects of that same exposure. The findings, which currently appear in the journal PLOS ONE, will make it possible to develop simpler and cheaper tests to screen chemicals for their potential cancer causing risk.
National Institutes of Health, Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Shift work linked to heightened risk of type 2 diabetes
Shift work is linked to a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the risk seemingly greatest among men and those working rotating shift patterns, indicates an analysis of the available evidence published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Contact: Stephanie Burns
sburns@bmj.com
44-020-738-36920
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neuron
UCSF researchers uncover an unexpected role for endostatin in the nervous system
Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Pesticide linked to 3 generations of disease
Washington State University researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Skinner
skinner@wsu.edu
509-335-1524
Washington State University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell
Mechanism found for development of protective HIV antibodies
Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world's population
Odds are, there's a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world's population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common gut bacterial species, Bacteroides. This bacterium thought to be connected with obesity, diabetes and other gut-related diseases.

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Test helps predict which children with kidney disease will respond to standard therapy
Among children with sporadic nephrotic syndrome, genetic mutations in the kidney's filtration barrier were frequently linked with a lack of response to immunosuppressive treatments. The genetic test was even more predictive than a kidney biopsy for identifying children who would not benefit from immunosuppressive therapies.

Contact: Tracy Hampton
thampton@nasw.org
American Society of Nephrology

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Ferric citrate may reduce dialysis patients' need for multiple medications
Ferric citrate effectively reduced blood phosphorus levels while increasing iron stores and decreasing the need for intravenous iron and anemia medications in dialysis patients. The medication may help reduce complications and costs associated with kidney disease care.
Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc.

Contact: Tracy Hampton
thampton@nasw.org
American Society of Nephrology

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Gene changes in breast cancer cells pinpointed with new computational method
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, working with high-throughput data generated by breast cancer biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have devised a computational method to determine how gene networks are rewired as normal breast cells turn malignant and as they respond to potential cancer therapy agents.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, DOE/Breast Cancer Research Program

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University