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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Prognostic factors identified for peripheral squamous cell carcinomas of the lung
A better survival outcome is associated with low blood levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, or absence of tumor invasion either into the space between the lungs and chest wall or into blood vessels of individuals with a peripheral squamous cell carcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Some like it loud
Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genetics in Medicine
Clues to genetics of congenital heart defects emerge from Down syndrome study
The largest genetic study of congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome found a connection to rare, large genetic deletions affecting cilia.
NIH/Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
New hope for drug discovery in African sleeping sickness
The neglected trop­ical dis­ease affects tens of thou­sands of people and is mostly fatal. Now, new research co-​​authored by North­eastern chem­istry pro­fessor Michael Pol­lastri has iden­ti­fied hun­dreds of chem­ical com­pounds that could lead to a cure.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
European Spine Journal
New findings will improve the sex lives of women with back problems
Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings -- part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex -- outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month.

Contact: Pamela Smyth
psmyth@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4777
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New compounds reduce debilitating inflammation
Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The compounds, dubbed OD36 and OD38, appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2. RIPK2 is an enzyme that activates high-energy molecules to prompt the immune system to respond with inflammation. The findings of this research appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Burroughs Wellcome Career Award

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genes & Development
A new dent in HIV-1's armor
Salk scientists identify a promising target for HIV/AIDS treatment.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, Blasker-Rose-Miah Fund Margaret T. Morris Foundation

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volunteer guidelines for clinicians in the ebola epidemic
A consortium of Boston-based hospitals has prepared a set of guidelines, titled 'Sign Me Up: Rules of the Road for Humanitarian Volunteers during the Ebola Outbreak'. The authors paint an honest picture of volunteer circumstances, and ask those considering volunteering to not make the decision lightly. They insist that the 'global healthcare community must and will rise to serve.'

Contact: Alice O'Donnell
dmphpjournal@gmail.com
240-833-4429
Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
APIC Ebola readiness survey findings
Only 6 percent of US hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at US hospitals conducted Oct. 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology

Contact: Liz Garman
egarman@apic.org
202-454-2604
Association for Professionals in Infection Control

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
EBioMedicine
Growing a blood vessel in a week
The technology for creating new tissues from stem cells has taken a giant leap forward. Three tablespoons of blood are all that is needed to grow a brand new blood vessel in just seven days. This is shown in a new study from The University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden, published in EBioMedicine.

Contact: Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson
suchitra.holgersson@gu.se
46-727-490-808
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
PeerJ
Ebola's evolutionary roots are more ancient than previously thought, study finds
A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola's family history. The research shows that Ebola and Marburg are each members of ancient evolutionary lines, and that these two viruses last shared a common ancestor sometime prior to 16-23 million years ago.

Contact: Charlotte Hsu
chsu22@buffalo.edu
716-645-4655
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Ebola virus: Update on research in France
With the current situation of the Ebola epidemic, it quickly became necessary for French research to be mobilised rapidly. In August 2014, the French Minister of Health and Secretary of State for Higher Education and Research made Aviesan responsible for preparing and organising the response of French research to infectious emergencies.

Contact: Priscille RIVIERE
presse@aviesan.fr
33-014-423-6097
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Cat dentals fill you with dread?
A survey published this year found that over 50 percent of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity of their small animal patients. Once in practice, things don't always improve and, anecdotally, it seems many vets dread feline dental procedures.

Contact: Katie Baker
katie.baker@sagepub.co.uk
020-732-48719
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Endurance athletes at risk of swimming-induced pulmonary edema
Endurance athletes taking part in triathlons are at risk of the potentially life-threatening condition of swimming-induced pulmonary edema.

Contact: Rosalind Dewar
media@rsm.ac.uk
44-015-807-64713
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
For brain hemorrhage, risk of death is lower at high-volume hospitals
For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of subarachnoid hemorrhage cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association
Medical costs for stroke survivors stay high 10 years on
New data shows that healthcare and personal costs to support survivors of stroke remains high 10 years on. The Monash University research, published today in the journal Stroke, is the first to look at the long-term costs for the two main causes of stroke; ischemic where the blood supply stops due to a blood clot, and hemorrhagic, which occurs when a weakened blood vessel supplying the brain bursts.

Contact: Lucy Handford
media@monash.edu
Monash University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
International Journal of Cardiology
Shutting off blood supply to an extremity to protect the heart
Shutting off the blood supply to an arm or a leg before cardiac surgery protects the heart during the operation. Researchers have looked into heart muscle cells of the left chamber of the heart to understand how activation of the body's very own defense mechanisms may protect the heart in times of reduced oxygen supply.

Contact: Katrine Hordnes Slagsvold
katrine.hordnes@ntnu.no
47-911-67717
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stem Cells
Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, M.S., Ph.D., who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Overweight kids misinterpret asthma symptoms, potentially overuse medication
New research shows obese children with asthma may mistake symptoms of breathlessness for loss of asthma control leading to high and unnecessary use of rescue medications. The study was published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the official scientific journal of the American Association of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
The Nemours Foundation

Contact: Tamara Moore
tmoore@gymr.com
202-745-5114
GYMR

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Prevention Science
Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts
New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. This research is especially significant since Mexican American youth face significant barriers that lead them to have one of the highest high-school drop-out rates in the nation.

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Medical Screening
Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.
Academic Pediatric Association

Contact: Matt Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
An over-the-scope clipping device for endoscopic management of gastrointestinal defects is safe and effective
A new study reports that over-the-scope clip placement is a safe and effective therapy for the closure of gastrointestinal defects such as anastomotic leaks, fistulae and perforations. Clinical success was best achieved in patients undergoing closure of perforations or leaks when over-the-scope clip placement was used for primary or rescue therapy. Overall clinical success for closure of perforations and leaks ranged between 90 percent and 73 percent; successful closure of fistulae was achieved in less than half of patients.

Contact: Anne Brownsey
abrownsey@asge.org
630-570-5635
American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Synthetic biology on ordinary paper, results off the page
Two breakthroughs clenched by Wyss scientists, paper–based synthetic gene networks and toehold switch gene regulators, could each have revolutionary impacts on synthetic biology: the former brings synthetic biology out of the traditional confinement of a living cell, the latter provides a rational design framework to enable de-novo design of both the parts and the network of gene regulation.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Dartmouth study measures breast cancer tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
A Dartmouth study suggests that it may be possible to use Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic imaging to predict which patients will best respond to chemotherapy used to shrink breast cancer tumors before surgery. These findings could eliminate delays in effective early treatment for tumors unlikely to respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Novel software application can stratify early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients
Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool developed at Mayo Clinic that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung cancer patients into risk groups that have significantly different disease-free survival outcome.

Contact: Rob mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer