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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Current Oncology Reports
Cancer patients should not hesitate to speak with their doctors about dietary supplements
Many cancer patients use dietary supplements such as vitamins, minerals and herbs or other botanicals but often don't tell their doctor. This gap in communication can happen when patients believe that their doctors are indifferent or negative toward their use of these supplements. As a result, patients may find information about dietary supplements from unreliable sources, exposing themselves to unneeded risks. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers describe a practical patient-centered approach to managing dietary supplement use in cancer care in a review article.

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Ecology
Seaweed engineers build crustacean homes; old forests store new nitrogen
In this month's issue of Ecology, invasive seaweed shelters native crustaceans, mature forests store nitrogen in soil, and stream invertebrates aren't eating what we thought they were eating.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
UTMB researchers uncover powerful new class of weapons in the war on cancer
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch, and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have identified small molecules that can represent a new class of anticancer drugs with a novel target for the treatment of lung cancer. These findings are detailed in Nature Communications. A PCT patent was jointly documented by these two Institutes for the invention.
National Institutes of Health, Emory University, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
If you're over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory
Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, University of Kentucky, and University of Maryland found that for people 60 and older who do not have dementia, light alcohol consumption during late life is associated with higher episodic memory -- the ability to recall memories of events.

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
Lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Prostate
Finally: A missing link between vitamin D and prostate cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Prostate offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Chemical Physical Letters
New insights on carbonic acid in water
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
A real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside the body
Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, Johns Hopkins researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are responsible for a range of diseases, including fatal pneumonias and various bloodstream or solid-organ infections acquired in and outside the hospital.
National Institutes of Health, Harvard University Center for AIDS Research

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
Paralyzed patients have weaker bones and a higher risk of fractures than expected
People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
New ALS associated gene identified using innovative strategy
Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2000
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Obesity Surgery
How people view their own weight influences bariatric surgery success
Negative feelings about one's own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research appearing in the journal Obesity Surgery, published by Springer. The study, from the Geisinger Health System in the US, is considered the first and only study to examine internalized weight bias in relation to post-surgical weight loss success in adults.
Living Heart Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Expert recommendations for diagnosing pediatric acute onset neuropsychiatric syndrome
A panel of leading clinicians and researchers across various general and specialty pediatric fields developed a consensus statement recommending how to evaluate youngsters in whom neuropsychiatric symptoms suddenly develop, including the abrupt, dramatic onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This difficult diagnosis is typically made by pediatricians or other primary care clinicians and child psychiatrists, who will benefit from the guidance provided in the recommendations published in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abrupt shifts in disease
New work by a pioneering scientist details how subtle changes in mitochondrial function may cause a broad range of common metabolic and degenerative diseases. Mitochondria are tiny energy-producing structures within our cells that contain their own DNA.
National Insitutes of Health, Simons Foundation

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Child Development
Early intervention could boost education levels
Taking steps from an early age to improve childhood education skills could raise overall population levels of academic achievement by as much as 5 percent, and reduce socioeconomic inequality in education by 15 percent, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Catherine Chittleborough
catherine.chittleborough@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-131-684
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New study shows that shifting precipitation patterns affect tea flavor, health compounds
New research shows that major antioxidant compounds that determine tea health properties and taste fell up to 50 percent during an extreme monsoon.

Contact: Evelyn Boswell
evelynb@montana.edu
406-994-5135
Montana State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BMC Infectious Diseases
Lessons from the 'Spanish flu,' nearly 100 years later
Just in time for flu season, a new Michigan State University study of 'the mother of all pandemics' could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases.

Contact: Kristen Parker
kristen.parker@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8942
Michigan State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Fast modeling of cancer mutations
A new genome-editing technique enables rapid analysis of genes mutated in tumors.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Indiana Project screenings show need for more mental health services in youth detention
Indiana is at the forefront of providing mental health screening and services to juvenile offenders, but more efforts are needed to improve the services provided to detained youths, according to Indiana University School of Medicine research findings published in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Contact: Mary Hardin
mhardin@iu.edu
317-274-5456
Indiana University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Analytical Chemistry
Skin patch could replace the syringe for disease diagnosis
Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe. In the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, one team reports they have designed and successfully tested, for the first time, a small skin patch that detected malaria proteins in live mice. It could someday be adapted for use in humans to diagnose other diseases, too.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry
Olive oil more stable and healthful than seed oils for frying food
Frying is one of the world's most popular ways to prepare food -- think fried chicken and french fries. Even candy bars and whole turkeys have joined the list. But before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Susceptibility for relapsing major depressive disorder can be calculated
The question if an individual will suffer from relapsing major depressive disorder is not de-termined by accident. Neuroscientists from the Mercator Research Group 'Structure of Memory' have chosen a new research approach, using computer-based models to study the disease. They show that chronic depression is triggered due to an unfortunate combination of internal and external factors. Their research findings were published in the journal PLoS ONE.
Stiftung Mercator

Contact: Selver Demic
selver.demic@rub.de
49-023-432-29616
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Hospital logs staggering 2.5 million alarms in just a month
Following the study of a hospital that logged more than 2.5 million patient monitoring alarms in just one month, researchers at University of California San Francisco have, for the first time, comprehensively defined the detailed causes as well as potential solutions for the widespread issue of alarm fatigue in hospitals.
GE Healthcare

Contact: Scott Maier
scott.maier@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Thermal receipt paper may be a potentially significant source of BPA
Thermal paper, sometimes used in cash register receipts, may be a potential source of exposure to the hormone disruptor bisphenol-A.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Thermal paper cash register receipts account for high bisphenol A (BPA) levels in humans
Research conducted at the University of Missouri is providing the first data that BPA from thermal paper used in cash register receipts accounts for high levels of BPA in humans. Subjects studied showed a rapid increase of BPA in their blood after using a skin care product and then touching a store receipt with BPA.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia