EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
2-Sep-2014 13:14
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Policy & Ethics


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New synthesis method may shape future of nanostructures, clean energy
A team of University of Maryland physicists has published new nanoscience advances that they and other scientists say make possible new nanostructures and nanotechnologies with huge potential applications ranging from clean energy and quantum computing advances to new sensor development.
Office of Naval Research, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Research Corporation

Contact: Lee Tune
ltune@umd.edu
301-405-4679
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Population, Space and Place
Coming or going? How Scottish independence could affect migration
In light of the upcoming referendum on whether Scotland should be an independent country, researchers present a set of predictions of the possible effects on internal and international migration.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Scientists find possible neurobiological basis for tradeoff between honesty, self-interest
A team of scientists from the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and the University of California at Berkeley used advanced imaging techniques to study how the brain makes choices about honesty.

Contact: Paula Brewer Byron
paulabyron@vt.edu
540-526-2027
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Journal of Experimental Criminology
WSU 'deadly force' lab finds racial disparities in shootings
Participants in an innovative Washington State University study of deadly force were more likely to feel threatened in scenarios involving black people. But when it came time to shoot, participants were biased in favor of black suspects, taking longer to pull the trigger against them than against armed white or Hispanic suspects.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institute of Justice, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lois James
lois_james@wsu.edu
509-358-7944
Washington State University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Family dinners reduce effects of cyberbullying in adolescents
Sharing regular family meals with children may help protect them from the effects of cyberbullying, according to a study by McGill professor Frank Elgar, Institute for Health and Social Policy. Because family meal times represent social support and exchanges in the home that benefit adolescents' well-being, Elgar suggests that this family contact and communication can also reduce some of the distressing effects of cyberbullying.

Contact: Frank Elgar
frank.elgar@mcgill.ca
514-398-1739
McGill University

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Changing global diets is vital to reducing climate change
Healthier diets and reducing food waste are part of a combination of solutions needed to ensure food security and avoid dangerous climate change, say the team behind a new study.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
British Journal of General Practice
Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer
Scientists at the University of Exeter Medical School found that one in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine -- identified by their GP testing their urine -- transpired to have bladder cancer. The figure was around half those who had visible blood in their urine -- the best known indicator of bladder cancer. However, it was still higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant further investigation.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate
A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2 cm more than the global average of 6 cm.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Report advocates improved police training
A new report released yesterday by the Mental Health Commission of Canada identifies ways to improve the mental health training and education that police personnel receive.

Contact: Anne Craig
anne.craig@queensu.ca
613-533-6570
Queen's University

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
China's reform of R&D budget management doesn't go far enough
China's budget management is lagging behind countries which spend similar amounts on research and development, and recent reform has not gone far enough. That is the view of the University of Nottingham's Dr. Cong Cao, whose research is published on Aug. 29, 2014, in the prestigious academic journal, Science.
European Union's 7th Framework Program

Contact: Dr. Cong Cao
cong.cao@nottingham.ac.uk
44-115-846-7972
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science Advice to Governments
Science advice to governments comes of age at Auckland conference
Responding to the increasingly global nature of societal challenges, practitioners of science advice to governments formed a global network to share practice and strengthen their ties, at the first global conference on science advice to governments, which was held in Auckland, New Zealand this week.

Contact: Pandora Carlyon
p.carlyon@auckland.ac.nz
64-992-32305
International Council for Science

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Water Resources Research
Climate change puts endangered Devils Hole pupfish at risk of extinction
Climate change is hurting reproduction of the endangered Devils Hole pupfish, threatening the survival of this rare species that has numbered as few as 35 individuals, new research by the University of Nevada, Reno and Desert Research Institute shows.
National Park Service, Nevada Department of Wildlife, Death Valley Natural History Association

Contact: Mike Wolterbeek
mwolterbeek@unr.edu
University of Nevada, Reno

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Environmental Sciences, Processes and Impacts
Second-hand e-cig smoke compared to regular cigarette smoke
Second-hand e-cig smoke has 10 times less particulate matter than regular cigarette smoke; but higher levels of certain toxic metals.
Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Surgery
Females ignored in basic medical research
A new study from Northwestern Medicine has found that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or female cells in their published studies -- despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a crucial role in medical research.

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Psychology & Health
How does it feel to be old in different societies?
People aged 70 and over who identify themselves as 'old' feel worse about their own health in societies where they perceive they have lower value than younger age groups.

Contact: Martin Herrema
M.J.Herrema@kent.ac.uk
44-012-278-23581
University of Kent

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Research and Politics
Saddam Hussein -- a sincere dictator?
Are political speeches manipulative and strategic? They could be -- when politicians say one thing in public, and privately believe something else, political scientists say.

Contact: Katie Baker
katie.baker@sagepub.co.uk
44-207-324-8719
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
BMJ Open
Plain cigarette packs don't hurt small retailers or boost trade in illicit tobacco
Plain packs for tobacco products don't hurt small retailers, flood the market with very cheap cigarettes, or boost the trade in illicit tobacco, finds research on the early experience of the policy in Australia, and published in the online journal BMJ Open.
Quit Victoria, VicHealth, Department of Health for the Victorian Smoking and Health annual survey

Contact: Caroline White
cwhite@bmj.com
44-079-808-00465
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
International Carbon Conference 2014
Global warming pioneer calls for CO2 to be taken from atmosphere and stored underground
Wally Broeker, the first person to alert the world to Global Warming, has called for atmospheric CO2 to be captured and stored underground.

Contact: Tom Parkhill
tom@parkhill.it
39-349-238-8191
European Association of Geochemistry

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
No cookie-cutter divorces, so what info should online co-parenting classes offer?
Required online classes for divorcing couples who have children are good at teaching parents how to deal with children's needs and responses to their family's new situation. But co-parenting couples would benefit from content that helps adults cope with their own emotions and from unique tracks for families with special circumstances such as intimate partner violence or alcoholism, said a University of Illinois researcher in human and community development.

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops
Researchers have identified a gene that could help engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly. The findings appear in the journal Nature and could make it easier to feed the world's growing population in the face of climate change.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Marine Pollution Bulletin
NOAA's Marine Debris Program reports on the national issue of derelict fishing traps
Thousands of fishing traps are lost or abandoned each year in US waters. The NOAA report is the first of its kind to examine the derelict fish trap problem, nationally, and recommends actions to better manage and prevent it.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Soda tax for adolescents and exercise for children best strategies for reducing obesity
Childhood obesity in the United States remains high. A tax on sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, sweet teas, and sports drinks would reduce obesity in adolescents more than other policies, such as exercise or an advertising ban, and would also generate significant revenue for additional obesity prevention activities, say researchers writing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The study also demonstrated that physical activity would benefit children ages 6-12 most.

Contact: Angela J. Beck
ajpmmedia@elsevier.com
734-764-8775
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature Genetics
NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing
The National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing policy to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants. The final policy was posted in the Federal Register Aug. 26, 2014 and published in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts Aug. 27, 2014.

Contact: NIH Office of Communications
nihnmb@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5787
NIH/Office of the Director

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
New study charts the global invasion of crop pests
Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Change Biology
Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees -- and the news is not good.
US Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University