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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to Simon Fraser University researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.
Canadian Police Research Centre

Contact: Gail Anderson
ganderso@sfu.ca
778-782-3589
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Appetite
Changes at the grocery store could turn the burden of shopping with children on its head
Avoiding power struggles in the grocery store with children begging for sweets, chips and other junk foods -- and parents often giving in -- could be helped by placing the healthier options at the eye level of children and moving the unhealthy ones out of the way.
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, GRACE Communications Foundation

Contact: Barbara Benham
bbenham1@jhu.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Health Services
Paperwork consumes one-sixth of US physicians' time and erodes morale: Study
The average US doctor spends 16.6 percent of his or her working hours on non-patient-related paperwork, time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients, according to an analysis of a nationally representative survey of physicians. Current trends in US health policy -- a shift to employment in large practices, the implementation of electronic medical records, and the increasing prevalence of financial risk sharing -- are likely to increase doctors' paperwork burdens and may decrease career satisfaction.

Contact: Mark Almberg
mark@pnhp.org
312-782-6006
Physicians for a National Health Program

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sea turtles' first days of life: A sprint and a ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Turtle Foundation and Queen Mary University of London followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, which was primarily funded by the Kiel Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean,' local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors. The results are published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
New policymaking tool for shift to renewable energy
Multiple pathways exist to a low greenhouse gas future, all involving increased efficiency and a dramatic shift in energy supply away from fossil fuels. A new tool 'SWITCH' enables policymakers and planners to assess the economic and environmental implications of different energy scenarios. It is presented today at the congress Global Challenges: Achieving Sustainability, hosted by the University of Copenhagen.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Time for change -- additional daylight saving could improve public health
New research published just before the end of UK daylight saving shows that proposals to permanently increase the hours of waking daylight could have real impacts on public health. The study led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine shows that having later sunsets leads to an increase in children's physical activity. Over 23,000 children were studied in nine countries, with researchers examining associations between time of sunset and activity levels, measured via accelerometers.
National Institute for Health Research, UK National Prevention Research Initiative

Contact: Press Office
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-207-927-2802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Top marine scientists call for action on 'invisible' fisheries
To protect our oceans from irreversible harm, governments, conservationists, and researchers around the world must address the enormous threat posed by unregulated and destructive fisheries, say top marine scientists.

Contact: Tyler Stiem
t.stiem@projectseahorse.org
604-827-5142
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
eScholarship
California's tobacco control efforts losing steam, finds UCSF report
California's position as a leader in tobacco control is under threat, according to a new report from the UC San Francisco Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education.

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature
No-till agriculture may not bring hoped-for boost in global crop yields, study finds
No-till farming appears to hold promise for boosting crop yields only in dry regions, not in the cool, moist areas of the world, this study found.
National Key Science and Technology Project of China

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Children in high-quality early childhood education are buffered from changes in family income
A new Norwegian study shows that while losses in family income ought to predict increases in behavior problems for many children, attending high-quality early childhood centers offered protection against economic decline. The study looked at 75,000 children from birth through age 3, in addition to their families. In Norway, publicly subsidized high-quality early childhood education and care is available to all children, from low-income to affluent, starting at age 1.
Norwegian Ministry of Health, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke, Research Council of Norway.

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Highest altitude ice age human occupation documented in Peruvian Andes
In the southern Peruvian Andes, an archaeological team led by researchers at the University of Maine has documented the highest altitude ice age human occupation anywhere in the world -- nearly 4,500 meters above sea level.
Dan and Betty Churchill Exploration Fund, National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program, National Science Foundation

Contact: Margaret Nagle
nagle@maine.edu
207-581-3745
University of Maine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Ecology
Seaweed engineers build crustacean homes; old forests store new nitrogen
In this month's issue of Ecology, invasive seaweed shelters native crustaceans, mature forests store nitrogen in soil, and stream invertebrates aren't eating what we thought they were eating.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NIST's Cloud Computing Roadmap details research requirements and action plans
NIST has published the final version of the US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, Volumes I and II. The roadmap focuses on strategic and tactical objectives to support the federal government's accelerated adoption of cloud computing.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
evelyn.brown@nist.gov
301-975-5661
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Baker Institute paper: Data indicate there is no immigration crisis
Is there an 'immigration crisis' on the US-Mexico border? Not according to an examination of historical immigration data, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BioScience
New tool identifies high-priority dams for fish survival
Scientists have identified 181 California dams that may need to increase water flows to protect native fish downstream. The screening tool, developed by the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, to select 'high-priority' dams may be particularly useful during drought years amid competing demands for water.
Natural Resources Defense Council, California Trout, Trout Unlimited, the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation, and the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program

Contact: Ted Grantham
tgrantham@usgs.gov
970-226-9386
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Indiana Project screenings show need for more mental health services in youth detention
Indiana is at the forefront of providing mental health screening and services to juvenile offenders, but more efforts are needed to improve the services provided to detained youths, according to Indiana University School of Medicine research findings published in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Contact: Mary Hardin
mhardin@iu.edu
317-274-5456
Indiana University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Global consumption an increasingly significant driver of tropical deforestation
International trade with agricultural and wood products is an increasingly important driver of tropical deforestation. More than a third of recent deforestation can be tied to production of beef, soy, palm oil and timber. 'The trend is clear, the drivers of deforestation have been globalized and commercialized,' says assistant professor Martin Persson, Chalmers University of Technology.

Contact: Christian Borg
christian.borg@chalmers.se
46-317-723-395
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Recently discovered microbe is key player in climate change
Scientists have discovered how an invisible menagerie of microbes in permafrost soils acts as global drivers of Earth processes such as climate via gas exchange between soils and the atmosphere. These findings will help climate modelers more accurately predict Earth's future climate.
Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research, UA Technology and Research Initiative Fund

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Brain simulation raises questions
What does it mean to simulate the human brain? Why is it important to do so? And is it even possible to simulate the brain separately from the body it exists in? These questions are discussed in a new paper published in the scientific journal Neuron today.

Contact: Kathinka Evers
kathinka.evers@crb.uu.se
46-184-716-243
Uppsala University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
100 days in Michigan: U-M team releases new analysis of state's Medicaid expansion
Right out of the starting gate, Michigan's expansion of health coverage for the poor and near-poor holds lessons for other states that are still on the fence about expanding their own Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act, a new analysis shows.

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice
Criminologists try to solve murder mystery: Who will become a killer?
In a study of 1,354 youths charged with serious crimes, the youths charged with homicide had lower IQs and more exposure to violence.
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National Institute of Justice, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, William Penn Foundation

Contact: Brittany Hoover
brittany.hoover@utdallas.edu
972-883-4357
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NOAA team discovers 2 vessels from WWII convoy battle off North Carolina
A team of researchers led by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant vessels from World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, UNC-Coastal Studies Institute, National Park Service

Contact: Lauren Heesemann
lauren.heesemann@noaa.gov
252-475-5495
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Zoology
'Shrinking goats' another indicator that climate change affects animal size
Alpine goats appear to be shrinking in size as they react to changes in climate, according to new research from Durham University.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Leighton Kitson
leighton.kitson@durham.ac.uk
44-191-334-6075
Durham University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Conservation Biology
A legal trade in horn would improve rhino protection and help sustainable development
The extinction in the wild of the southern white rhino population could be prevented by letting local communities take responsibility of the animals and giving them permission to harvest horns in a controlled manner through a legal trade. Rhino horn is made of the same material as human hair and fingernails and grows back in two to three years.

Contact: Enrico Di Minin
enrico.di.minin@helsinki.fi
358-503-185-717
University of Helsinki

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
What Americans fear most -- new poll from Chapman University
The Chapman Survey on American Fears included 1,500 participants from across the nation and all walks of life. Underscoring Chapman's growth and emergence in the sciences, the research team leading this effort pared the information down into four basic categories: personal fears, crime, natural disasters and fear factors.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University