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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Policy
Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent
Scientists who study migratory marine animals can rarely predict where the animals' paths will lead. In a new paper, Duke researchers argue that coastal nations don't have precedent under the law of the sea to require scientists to seek advance permission to remotely track tagged animals who may enter their waters. Requiring advance consent undermines the goals of the law, which is meant to encourage scientific research for conservation of marine animals.
Mary Derrickson McCurdy Visiting Scholar Program, Duke University Marine Laboratory

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
European Spine Journal
New findings will improve the sex lives of women with back problems
Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings -- part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex -- outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month.

Contact: Pamela Smyth
psmyth@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4777
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Emerging Adulthood
Relationships benefit when parents and adult children use multiple communication channels
University of Kansas research has found that found that adult children's relationship satisfaction with their parents is modestly influenced by the number of communication tools, such as cell phones, email, social networking sites, they use to communicate.

Contact: Christine Metz Howard
cmetzhoward@ku.edu
785-864-8852
University of Kansas

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Organization Science
Startups should seek quality -- not quantity -- in partnerships, study finds
When partnering with larger companies, startups with a small number of carefully chosen alliances will reap the most benefits, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

Contact: Matthew Biddle
mrbiddle@buffalo.edu
716-645-5455
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volunteer guidelines for clinicians in the ebola epidemic
A consortium of Boston-based hospitals has prepared a set of guidelines, titled 'Sign Me Up: Rules of the Road for Humanitarian Volunteers during the Ebola Outbreak'. The authors paint an honest picture of volunteer circumstances, and ask those considering volunteering to not make the decision lightly. They insist that the 'global healthcare community must and will rise to serve.'

Contact: Alice O'Donnell
dmphpjournal@gmail.com
240-833-4429
Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
For brain hemorrhage, risk of death is lower at high-volume hospitals
For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of subarachnoid hemorrhage cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
Global boom in hydropower expected this decade
An unprecedented boom in hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies. While this is expected to double the global electricity production from hydropower, it could reduce the number of our last remaining large free-flowing rivers by about 20 percent and pose a serious threat to freshwater biodiversity.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association
Medical costs for stroke survivors stay high 10 years on
New data shows that healthcare and personal costs to support survivors of stroke remains high 10 years on. The Monash University research, published today in the journal Stroke, is the first to look at the long-term costs for the two main causes of stroke; ischemic where the blood supply stops due to a blood clot, and hemorrhagic, which occurs when a weakened blood vessel supplying the brain bursts.

Contact: Lucy Handford
media@monash.edu
Monash University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Receiving gossip about others promotes self-reflection and growth
Why are individuals interested in hearing gossip about others' achievements and failures? Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands studied the effect positive and negative gossip has on how the recipient evaluates him or herself. The study is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Contact: Jennifer Santisi
press@spsp.org
202-524-6543
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Prevention Science
Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts
New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. This research is especially significant since Mexican American youth face significant barriers that lead them to have one of the highest high-school drop-out rates in the nation.

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Environmental Psychology
Nation's 'personality' influences its environmental stewardship, shows new study
Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability, says research from the University of Toronto.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to Simon Fraser University researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.
Canadian Police Research Centre

Contact: Gail Anderson
ganderso@sfu.ca
778-782-3589
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Psychiatry and Human Development
Bradley Hospital finds sleep difficulties common among toddlers with psychiatric disorders
John Boekamp, Ph.D., clinical director of the Pediatric Partial Hospital Program at Bradley Hospital recently led a study that found sleep difficulties -- particularly problems with falling asleep -- were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders. The study, titled 'Sleep Onset and Night Waking Insomnias in Preschoolers with Psychiatric Disorders,' is now published online in the journal Child Psychiatry & Human Development.

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-432-1328
Lifespan

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Medical Care
62 percent of colorectal cancer patients report financial burden from treatment, study finds
Nearly two-thirds of patients treated for colorectal cancer reported some measure of financial burden due to their treatment, according to a new study. The burden was greatest among patients who received chemotherapy.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Depression and Anxiety
Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers
Two new reports show that new soldiers and civilians do not differ in their probability of having at least one lifetime mental disorder but that some mental disorders are more common among new soldiers than civilians. In addition, the rates of pre-enlistment suicidality among new soldiers are comparable to matched civilians.
US Department of the Army, US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Birds roosting in large groups less likely to contract West Nile virus
A University of Illinois study found that when large groups of birds roost together the chances that an individual bird will get bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus and subsequently contract the disease actually go down.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Study: Many in US have poor nutrition, with the disabled doing worst
A new study finds that most US adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet
Treating ill health might not be enough to help homeless people get off the streets
Health care providers should recognize that any effective strategy to address homelessness needs to include both interventions to improve the health of homeless individuals as well as larger-scale policy changes, according to a paper published today.

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Health Services
Paperwork consumes one-sixth of US physicians' time and erodes morale: Study
The average US doctor spends 16.6 percent of his or her working hours on non-patient-related paperwork, time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients, according to an analysis of a nationally representative survey of physicians. Current trends in US health policy -- a shift to employment in large practices, the implementation of electronic medical records, and the increasing prevalence of financial risk sharing -- are likely to increase doctors' paperwork burdens and may decrease career satisfaction.

Contact: Mark Almberg
mark@pnhp.org
312-782-6006
Physicians for a National Health Program

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Babies' interest in faces linked to callous and unemotional traits
Scientists at the University of Manchester, King's College London and the University of Liverpool have found that an infant's preference for a person's face, rather than an object, is associated with lower levels of callous and unemotional behaviors in toddlerhood.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@manchester.ac.uk
University of Manchester

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Dispositional mindfulness associated with better cardiovascular health
A new study that measured 'dispositional mindfulness' along with seven indicators of cardiovascular health found that persons reporting higher degrees of awareness of their present feelings and experiences had better health. The research suggests that interventions to improve mindfulness could benefit cardiovascular health, an idea researchers can test.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode
The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research led by Yale researchers predicts.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1345
Yale University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
New insight on why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease
Researchers discover the cell events in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome that lead to the amyloid pathology observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The findings support a novel approach to treating and preventing both diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's Association, Global Down Syndrome Foundation, American Assistance Foundation

Contact: Susan Gammon
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5012
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have discovered that music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioural and emotional problems.

Contact: Claire O'Callaghan
c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Time for change -- additional daylight saving could improve public health
New research published just before the end of UK daylight saving shows that proposals to permanently increase the hours of waking daylight could have real impacts on public health. The study led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine shows that having later sunsets leads to an increase in children's physical activity. Over 23,000 children were studied in nine countries, with researchers examining associations between time of sunset and activity levels, measured via accelerometers.
National Institute for Health Research, UK National Prevention Research Initiative

Contact: Press Office
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-207-927-2802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine