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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have discovered that music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioural and emotional problems.

Contact: Claire O'Callaghan
c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Children in high-quality early childhood education are buffered from changes in family income
A new Norwegian study shows that while losses in family income ought to predict increases in behavior problems for many children, attending high-quality early childhood centers offered protection against economic decline. The study looked at 75,000 children from birth through age 3, in addition to their families. In Norway, publicly subsidized high-quality early childhood education and care is available to all children, from low-income to affluent, starting at age 1.
Norwegian Ministry of Health, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke, Research Council of Norway.

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Two days later: Adolescents' conflicts with family spill over to school, vice versa
Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day. A new study has found that these problems spill over in both directions for up to two days after. The study found that teens with more pronounced mental health symptoms, anxiety and depression, for example, are at risk for intensified spillover. The study followed over a hundred 13 to 17 year olds and their parents over a 14-day period.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence
A new longitudinal study has found that teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood. The study followed 184 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse teens from age 13 to 21. It found that giving in to 'peer pressure' was more common among teens whose parents used guilt, withdrawing love, fostering anxiety, or other psychologically manipulative tactics.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
If you're over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory
Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, University of Kentucky, and University of Maryland found that for people 60 and older who do not have dementia, light alcohol consumption during late life is associated with higher episodic memory -- the ability to recall memories of events.

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
Lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice
No silver bullet: ISU study identifies risk factors of youth charged with murder
News of a school shooting or a homicide involving a teenage suspect always leads to the question of why? It is human nature to want an explanation or someone to blame, and policymakers try to pinpoint a cause in an effort to prevent it from happening again. But too often, the speculation or rush to judgment clouds reality, said Matt DeLisi, a professor of sociology and criminal justice at Iowa State University.

Contact: Matt DeLisi
delisi@iastate.edu
515-294-8008
Iowa State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
Paralyzed patients have weaker bones and a higher risk of fractures than expected
People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Baker Institute paper: Data indicate there is no immigration crisis
Is there an 'immigration crisis' on the US-Mexico border? Not according to an examination of historical immigration data, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Obesity Surgery
How people view their own weight influences bariatric surgery success
Negative feelings about one's own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research appearing in the journal Obesity Surgery, published by Springer. The study, from the Geisinger Health System in the US, is considered the first and only study to examine internalized weight bias in relation to post-surgical weight loss success in adults.
Living Heart Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Expert recommendations for diagnosing pediatric acute onset neuropsychiatric syndrome
A panel of leading clinicians and researchers across various general and specialty pediatric fields developed a consensus statement recommending how to evaluate youngsters in whom neuropsychiatric symptoms suddenly develop, including the abrupt, dramatic onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This difficult diagnosis is typically made by pediatricians or other primary care clinicians and child psychiatrists, who will benefit from the guidance provided in the recommendations published in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Social Science Research
The unexpected benefits of adjustable rate mortgages
As would be expected during a time of consumer deleveraging, households applied more than 70 percent of their mortgage savings to reducing outstanding credit card debts. Not only did the lower payments reduce mortgage defaults but credit card delinquencies fell. 'These choices had significant impact on foreclosures, house prices and employment in regions that were more exposed to interest rate declines,' the researchers concluded.

Contact: Susan Guibert
susan.guibert@chicagobooth.edu
773-702-9232
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abrupt shifts in disease
New work by a pioneering scientist details how subtle changes in mitochondrial function may cause a broad range of common metabolic and degenerative diseases. Mitochondria are tiny energy-producing structures within our cells that contain their own DNA.
National Insitutes of Health, Simons Foundation

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BMC Infectious Diseases
Lessons from the 'Spanish flu,' nearly 100 years later
Just in time for flu season, a new Michigan State University study of 'the mother of all pandemics' could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases.

Contact: Kristen Parker
kristen.parker@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8942
Michigan State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Indiana Project screenings show need for more mental health services in youth detention
Indiana is at the forefront of providing mental health screening and services to juvenile offenders, but more efforts are needed to improve the services provided to detained youths, according to Indiana University School of Medicine research findings published in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Contact: Mary Hardin
mhardin@iu.edu
317-274-5456
Indiana University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
Research suggests team-based care is most effective way to control hypertension
Patients diagnosed with high blood pressure are given better control of their condition from a physician-pharmacist collaborative intervention than physician management alone, according to new research.

Contact: Keith Coles
keith.coles@brunel.ac.uk
Brunel University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy
A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
Tom.Hughes@unchealth.unc.edu
984-974-1151
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Susceptibility for relapsing major depressive disorder can be calculated
The question if an individual will suffer from relapsing major depressive disorder is not de-termined by accident. Neuroscientists from the Mercator Research Group 'Structure of Memory' have chosen a new research approach, using computer-based models to study the disease. They show that chronic depression is triggered due to an unfortunate combination of internal and external factors. Their research findings were published in the journal PLoS ONE.
Stiftung Mercator

Contact: Selver Demic
selver.demic@rub.de
49-023-432-29616
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
British Journal of Criminology
The 2011 English summer riots: Courts accused of 'collective hysteria'
A review of sentencing following the 2011 English riots has shown that sentences were much harsher than realised at first.

Contact: Kath Paddison
kath.paddison@manchester.ac.uk
01-612-750-790
University of Manchester

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
BJOG releases MPT special supplement
Broad-spectrum prevention that can simultaneously prevent unintended pregnancy along with STIs, including HIV, is on the horizon say experts in a special supplement of the BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The issue features an international assemblage of researchers, funders, developers and advocates who identify the pressing global health rationale for MPTs and present new research and strategies for making the go/no-go funding and research decisions that shape the field.

Contact: Laura Vyda
Laura@sparkactionconsulting.com
510-387-1739
CAMI Health

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Anesthesia & Analgesia
Study finds no increase in pregnancy-related death for African-American women
In contrast to national trends, a study performed at Alabama's largest hospital finds no racial difference in the risk of pregnancy-related death between African-American and Caucasian women, reports the November issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Contact: Nancy Lynly
nlynly@iars.org
415-296-6907
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Exposure therapy appears helpful in treating patients with prolonged grief
Cognitive behavioral therapy with exposure therapy, where patients relive the experience of a death of a loved one, resulted in greater reductions in measures of prolonged grief disorder than CBT alone.

Contact: Richard A Bryant
r.bryant@unsw.edu.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
100 days in Michigan: U-M team releases new analysis of state's Medicaid expansion
Right out of the starting gate, Michigan's expansion of health coverage for the poor and near-poor holds lessons for other states that are still on the fence about expanding their own Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act, a new analysis shows.

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Mathematical model shows how the brain remains stable during learning
Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, UC San Francisco, and Columbia University in New York.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice
Criminologists try to solve murder mystery: Who will become a killer?
In a study of 1,354 youths charged with serious crimes, the youths charged with homicide had lower IQs and more exposure to violence.
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National Institute of Justice, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, William Penn Foundation

Contact: Brittany Hoover
brittany.hoover@utdallas.edu
972-883-4357
University of Texas at Dallas