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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA eyes Tropical Storm Fung-Wong move through Northwestern Pacific
Tropical Storm Fung-Wong continued to affect the Philippines while moving north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on the storm's clouds that showed some high, strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall over the northern and central regions of the country. The storm is now expected to affect three more countries over the next several days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm playing polo with western Mexico
Tropical Storm Polo is riding along the coast of western Mexico like horses in the game of his namesake. NASA's Aqua satellite saw Polo about 300 miles south-southeast of Baja California on its track north.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA, NOAA satellites show Odile's remnant romp through southern US
Former Hurricane Odile may be a bad memory for Baja California, but the remnants have moved over New Mexico and Texas where they are expected to bring rainfall there. NASA's TRMM satellite measured Odile's heavy rainfall rates on Sept. 18, and NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the clouds associated with the former storm continue to linger over the US Southwest on Sept. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA catches a weaker Edouard, headed toward Azores
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Atlantic Ocean and captured a picture of Tropical Storm Edouard as it continues to weaken.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics
Shrink-wrapping spacesuits
The MIT BioSuit is a skintight spacesuit that offers improved mobility and reduced mass compared to modern gas-pressurized spacesuits.

Contact: Kimberly Allen
allenkc@mit.edu
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Monster galaxies gain weight by eating smaller neighbors
Research to be published this Friday shows that massive galaxies in the universe have stopped making their own stars and are instead 'snacking' on nearby galaxies. Astronomers looked at more than 22,000 galaxies and found that while smaller galaxies are very efficient at creating stars from gas, the most massive galaxies are much less efficient at star formation, producing hardly any new stars themselves, and instead grow by eating other galaxies.

Contact: Kirsten Gottschalk
kirsten.gottschalk@icrar.org
61-438-361-876
International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Geology
Miranda: An icy moon deformed by tidal heating
Miranda, a small, icy moon of Uranus, is one of the most visually striking and enigmatic bodies in the solar system. Despite its relatively small size, Miranda appears to have experienced an episode of intense resurfacing that resulted in the formation of at least three remarkable and unique surface features -- polygonal-shaped regions called coronae.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong affecting Philippines
The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite saw the western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong over the central Philippines on Sept. 18. Fung-Wong developed on Sept. 17 as Tropical Depression 16W, and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA marks Polo for a hurricane
Hurricane Polo still appears rounded in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite, but forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that to change.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and Aqua satellite gathered data on Hurricane Edouard's rainfall, clouds and waning power is it continued moving northward in the Atlantic into cooler waters. On Sept. 18, NASA's Global Hawk #872 set out to investigate Edouard again as the storm is expected to weaken to a tropical storm
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Advances in Water Resources
Nile River monitoring influences northeast Africa's future
Curtin University research that monitors the volume of water in the Nile River Basin will help to level the playing field for more than 200 million northeast Africans who rely on the river's water supply.

Contact: Vicki Brett
vicki.brett@curtin.edu.au
61-401-103-755
Curtin University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA releases IRIS footage of X-class flare
On Sept. 10, 2014, NASA's newest solar observatory, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, joined other telescopes to witness an X-class flare -- an example of one of the strongest solar flares -- on the sun.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine
Space: The final frontier ... open to the public
Historically, spaceflight has been reserved for the very healthy. Astronauts are selected for their ability to meet the highest physical standards to prepare them for any unknown challenges. However, with the advent of commercial spaceflight, average people can now fly. The aerospace medicine community has had little information about what medical conditions should be considered particularly risky in the spaceflight environment, as most medical conditions have never been studied for risk in space -- until now.
Federal Aviation Administration Center of Excellence for Commercial Space Transportation, National Space Biomedical Research Institute

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
Hubble helps find smallest known galaxy containing a supermassive black hole
Astronomers using data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and ground observation have found an unlikely object in an improbable place -- a monster black hole lurking inside one of the tiniest galaxies ever known.
NASA

Contact: Ray Villard
villard@stsci.edu
410-338-4514
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
A massive black hole has been found at the center of an ultra-compact galaxy
A team of researchers, including an astronomer from Michigan State University, has discovered a huge black hole at the center of an ultra-compact galaxy -- the smallest galaxy known to contain one.
National Science Foundation, German Research Foundation, Gemini Telescope Partnership

Contact: Tom Oswald
tom.oswald@cabs.msu.edu
517-432-0920
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard far from US, but creating rough surf
Although NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Hurricane Edouard is far from US soil, it is powerful enough that it is creating dangerous swells along the US East Coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Polo intensifying
Tropical storm warnings now issued for a portion of the Southwestern coast of Mexico as Polo continues to strengthen. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed powerful thunderstorms around the center of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Odile soaking Mexico and southwestern US
Tropical Storm Odile continues to spread moisture and generate strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall over northern Mexico's mainland and the Baja California as well as the southwestern US. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates from space as it passed over Odile.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
SPIE Optics + Photonics
Proceedings of SPIE
Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies
Solutions required for progress on the frontiers of photonics technology are close at hand: in nature, when viewed through the perspective of engineer, says Montana State University optics researcher Joseph Shaw. Along with Rongguang Liang of the University of Arizona, Shaw chaired the 'Light in Nature' conference presenting new research in the field last month at SPIE Optics + Photonics and being published in the SPIE Digital Library.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
Big surprises can come in small packages
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found a monster lurking in a very unlikely place. New observations of the ultracompact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 have revealed a supermassive black hole at its heart, making this tiny galaxy the smallest ever found to host a supermassive black hole.

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
44-781-629-1261
ESA/Hubble Information Centre

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kalmaegi weakening over Vietnam
Tropical Storm Kalmaegi made landfall on Sept. 17 near the border of Vietnam and China and moved inland. Soon after the landfall as a typhoon, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the weaker tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature Physics
Reinterpreting dark matter
Tom Broadhurst, an Ikerbasque researcher at the University of the Basque Country, has participated alongside scientists of the National Taiwan University in a piece of research that explores cold dark matter in depth and proposes new answers about the formation of galaxies and the structure of the universe. These predictions, published in the prestigious journal Nature Physics, are being contrasted with fresh data provided by the Hubble space telescope.

Contact: Matxalen Sotillo
komunikazioa@ehu.es
34-688-673-770
University of the Basque Country

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature
Smallest known galaxy with a supermassive black hole
A University of Utah astronomer and his colleagues discovered that an ultracompact dwarf galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole -- the smallest galaxy known to contain such a massive light-sucking object. The finding suggests huge black holes may be more common than previously believed.
National Science Foundation, German Research Foundation, Gemini Observatory

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
NASA's HS3 mission covers transition of Hurricane Cristobal
NASA's Global Hawk 872 aircraft flew over Hurricane Cristobal on Aug. 28 and 29 and gathered data on the storm as it was becoming extra-tropical.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Violent origins of disc galaxies probed by ALMA
For decades scientists have believed that galaxy mergers usually result in the formation of elliptical galaxies. Now, for the the first time, researchers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array and a host of other radio telescopes have found direct evidence that merging galaxies can instead form disc galaxies, and that this outcome is in fact quite common. This surprising result could explain why there are so many spiral galaxies like the Milky Way in the Universe.

Contact: Lars Lindberg Christensen
lars@eso.org
49-893-200-6761
ESO