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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Best evidence yet for coronal heating theory detected by NASA sounding rocket
Scientists have recently gathered some of the strongest evidence to date to explain what makes the sun's outer atmosphere so much hotter than its surface. The new observations of the small-scale extremely hot temperatures are consistent with only one current theory: something called nanoflares -- a constant peppering of impulsive bursts of heating, none of which can be individually detected -- provide the mysterious extra heat
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Nature
Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states
As a quantum state collapses from a quantum superposition to a classical state or a different superposition, it will follow a path known as a quantum trajectory. For each start and end state there is an optimal or 'most likely' path, but it is not as easy to predict the path or track it experimentally as a straight-line between two points would be in our everyday, classical world. In a new paper featured on the July 30 cover of Nature, scientists from the Institute for Quantum Studies at Chapman University, the University of Rochester, University of California at Berkeley, and Washington University in St. Louis have shown that it is possible to track these quantum trajectories and compare them to a recently developed theory for predicting the most likely path a system will take between two states.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Halong's 'best side'
NASA satellite data showed Tropical Storm Halong's 'best side' or most powerful side was east of its center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA finds heavy rainfall and wind shear in newborn Tropical Storm Bertha
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM found rain was falling heavily in the Atlantic Ocean's second tropical storm of the hurricane season. Bertha was close to the Lesser Antilles, prompting warnings and watches.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
A train of 5 tropical cyclones in the Central and Eastern Pacific
A train of developing tropical low pressure areas stretch from the Eastern Pacific Ocean into the Central Pacific and they were captured in an image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Aug. 1. The train of five tropical lows include the remnants of Tropical Storm Genevieve and newly developed Tropical Storm Iselle.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
NASA eyes powerful bands of thunderstorms in newborn Tropical Storm Iselle
Tropical Storm Iselle was born in the Eastern Pacific Ocean soon after NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared imagery on the storm that showed powerful thunderstorms wrapping into developing storm's center. Iselle is not close enough to land to cause any watches or warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Companion planets can increase old worlds' chance at life
Having a companion in old age is good for people -- and, it turns out, might extend the chance for life on certain Earth-sized planets in the cosmos as well.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Kelley
kellep@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Nature
SwRI-led team's research shows giant asteroids battered early Earth
A new terrestrial bombardment model developed by an international group of scientists led by Southwest Research Institute indicates that Earth's surface was heavily reprocessed -- or melted, mixed and buried -- as a result of giant asteroid impacts more than four billion years ago.
NASA

Contact: Joe Fohn
jfohn@swri.org
210-522-4630
Southwest Research Institute

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Hubble shows farthest lensing galaxy yields clues to early universe
Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have unexpectedly discovered the most distant galaxy that acts as a cosmic magnifying glass. Seen here as it looked 9.6 billion years ago, this monster elliptical galaxy breaks the previous record-holder by 200 million years.
NASA

Contact: Ray Villard
Villard@stsci.edu
410-338-4514
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Science
NASA's Fermi space telescope reveals new source of gamma rays
Observations by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope of several stellar eruptions, called novae, firmly establish these relatively common outbursts almost always produce gamma rays, the most energetic form of light.
NASA, Naval Research Lab

Contact: Francis Reddy
Francis.j.reddy@nasa.gov
301-286-4453
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems
The resurrected Tropical Depression Genevieve appears squeezed between three other developing areas of low pressure. Satellite data from NOAA and NASA continue to show a lot of tropical activity in the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans on July 31.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Nature
Asteroid attacks significantly altered ancient Earth
New research shows that more than four billion years ago, the surface of Earth was heavily reprocessed as a result of giant asteroid impacts. A new model based on existing lunar and terrestrial data sheds light on the role asteroid bombardments played in the geological evolution of the uppermost layers of the Hadean Earth.

Contact: Nikki Cassis
ncassis@asu.edu
602-710-7169
Arizona State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Science
Fermi satellite detects gamma-rays from exploding novae
ASU professor Sumner Starrfield is part of a team that used the Large Area Telescope onboard NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope satellite to discover very high energy gamma rays being emitted by an exploding star. The surprising discovery dispels the long-held idea that classical nova explosions are not powerful enough to produce such high-energy radiation.

Contact: Nikki Cassis
ncassis@asu.edu
602-710-7169
Arizona State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Halong move northwest of Guam
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite passed over Guam as heavy rain fell over the island while Tropical Storm Halong's center passed just to the north of the island.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Research finds numerous unknown jets from young stars and planetary nebulae
Preliminary research findings from the University of Kent have identified hundreds of so far unknown jets from young stars, as well as numerous new planetary nebulae in the Galactic Plane.

Contact: Katie Newton
K.Newton@Kent.ac.uk
44-012-278-23581
University of Kent

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NASA catches 2 tropical troublemakers in Northwestern Pacific: Halong and 96W
There are two tropical low pressure areas in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean today and they're close enough to each other to be captured in one image generated from data gathered by NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NASA sees zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve reborn
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm that the remnant low pressure area of former Tropical Storm Genevieve has become a zombie storm, and has been reborn as a tropical depression on July 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Young binary star system may form planets with weird and wild orbits
While surveying a series of binary stars with ALMA, astronomers uncovered a striking pair of wildly misaligned planet-forming disks in the young binary star system HK Tau.

Contact: Charles Blue
cblue@nrao.edu
434-296-0314
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
ALMA finds double star with weird and wild planet-forming discs
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have found wildly misaligned planet-forming gas discs around the two young stars in the binary system HK Tauri. These new ALMA observations provide the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary discs in a double star. The new result also helps to explain why so many exoplanets -- unlike the planets in the solar system -- came to have strange, eccentric or inclined orbits.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Tidal forces gave moon its shape, according to new analysis
The shape of the moon deviates from a simple sphere in ways that scientists have struggled to explain. A new study by researchers at UC Santa Cruz shows that most of the moon's overall shape can be explained by taking into account tidal effects acting early in the moon's history.
Korea National Research Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
Mysterious molecules in space
New research has offered a tantalizing new possibility in the realm of interstellar molecules and diffuse interstellar bands: these mysterious molecules may be silicon-capped hydrocarbons like SiC3H, SiC4H and SiC5H. The team of scientists presents data and theoretical arguments to back that hypothesis in the Journal of Chemical Physics.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees warmer cloud tops as Tropical Storm Hernan degenerates
Tropical Storm Hernan degenerated into a remnant low pressure area on July 29. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed cloud tops were warming as the storm weakened.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Astronomers measure weight of galaxies, expansion of universe
Astronomers at the University of British Columbia have collaborated with international researchers to calculate the precise mass of the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies, dispelling the notion that the two galaxies have similar masses.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
The quantum Cheshire cat: Scientists separate a particle from its properties
The quantum Cheshire cat: Can a particle be separated from its properties? On July 29, the prestigious journal, Nature Communications, published the results of the first Cheshire Cat experiment, separating a neutron from its magnetic field, conducted by Chapman University in Orange, Calif., and Vienna University of Technology.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists separate a particle from its properties
The first experimental observation of a 'quantum Cheshire cat' could help to perform high precision measurements of quantum systems.

Contact: James Romero
james@proofcommunication.com
44-845-680-1866
Institut Laue-Langevin