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Space/Planetary Science
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Researchers find 3-million-year-old landscape beneath Greenland ice sheet
Glaciers and ice sheets are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything -- vegetation, soil and even the top layer of bedrock. So a team of university scientists and a NASA colleague were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland ice sheet, below two miles of ice.
NASA, University of Vermont

Contact: Maria-Jose Vinas-Garcia
maria-jose.vinasgarcia@nasa.gov
301-614-5883
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Sun emits a mid-level solar flare
The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 9:03 a.m. EDT on April 18, 2014, and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Geology
Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years
Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth. Scientists exploring large fields of impact glass in Argentina suggest that what happened on Earth might well have happened on Mars millions of years ago. Martian impact glass could hold traces of organic compounds.

Contact: Mark Nickel
mark_nickel@brown.edu
401-863-1638
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
First Earth-size planet is discovered in another star's habitable zone
A team of astronomers that includes Penn State scientists has discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star at a distance where liquid water might pool on the planet's surface. The discovery of this planet, named Kepler-186f, confirms for the first time that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our Sun.
NASA Kepler Participating Scientist Program

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Bright points in sun's atmosphere mark patterns deep in its interior
Like a balloon bobbing along in the air while tied to a child's hand, a tracer has been found in the sun's atmosphere to help track the flow of material coursing underneath the sun's surface.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Vitamin B3 might have been made in space, delivered to Earth by meteorites
Ancient Earth might have had an extraterrestrial supply of vitamin B3 delivered by carbon-rich meteorites, according to a new analysis by NASA-funded researchers. The result supports a theory that the origin of life may have been assisted by a supply of key molecules created in space and brought to Earth by comet and meteor impacts.
NASA

Contact: Bill Steigerwald
william.a.steigerwald@nasa.gov
301-286-5017
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Astronomers discover Earth-sized planet in habitable zone
Notre Dame astrophysicist Justin R. Crepp and researchers from NASA working with the Kepler space mission have detected an Earth-like planet orbiting the habitable zone of a cool star. The planet which was found using the Kepler Space Telescope has been identified as Kepler-186f and is 1.11 times the radius of the Earth. Their research titled, 'An Earth-sized Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Cool Star' will be published in the journal Science today.

Contact: Justin Crepp
jcrepp@nd.edu
574-631-4092
University of Notre Dame

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
First potentially habitable Earth-sized planet confirmed by Gemini and Keck observatories
The first Earth-sized exoplanet orbiting within the habitable zone of another star has been confirmed by observations with both the W. M. Keck Observatory and the Gemini Observatory. The initial discovery, made by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, is one of a handful of smaller planets found by Kepler and verified using large ground-based telescopes. It also confirms that Earth-sized planets do exist in the habitable zone of other stars.

Contact: Peter Michaud
pmichaud@gemini.edu
808-974-2510
Gemini Observatory

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics
Wireless power transfer achieved at 5-meter distance
Chun T. Rim, a professor of Nuclear & Quantum Engineering at KAIST, and his team showcased, on April 16, 2014 at the KAIST campus, Daejeon, Republic of Korea, a great improvement in the distance that electric power can travel wirelessly. They developed the 'Dipole Coil Resonant System' for an extended range of inductive power transfer, up to 5 meters between transmitter and receiver coils.

Contact: Lan Yoon
hlyoon@kaist.ac.kr
82-423-502-294
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Nature Geoscience
Methane climate change risk suggested by proof of redox cycling of humic substances
Disruption of natural methane-binding process may worsen climate change.

Contact: Press Office
press@goldschmidt2013.org
European Association of Geochemistry

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
A cross-section of the universe
An image of a galaxy cluster taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope gives a remarkable cross-section of the universe, showing objects at different distances and stages in cosmic history. They range from cosmic near neighbors to objects seen in the early years of the universe. The 14-hour exposure shows objects around a billion times fainter than can be seen with the naked eye.

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
49-893-200-6855
ESA/Hubble Information Centre

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Kepler astronomers discover new rocky planet that may have liquid water
An international team of researchers including San Francisco State University astronomer Stephen Kane have announced the discovery of a rocky planet that could potentially have liquid water on its surface. The new planet, discovered using NASA's Kepler telescope, is the fifth and outermost planet found orbiting in the habitable zone around the dwarf star Kepler-186.

Contact: Jonathan Morales
jmm1@sfsu.edu
415-338-1743
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature
Meteorites yield clues to red planet's early atmosphere
Geologists analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars to understand the history of the Martian atmosphere. Their April 17 Nature paper shows the atmospheres of Mars and Earth diverged in important ways early in the solar system's 4.6 billion year evolution.
NASA Cosmochemistry

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Searching for dark energy with neutrons
It does not always take a huge accelerator to do particle physics: First results from a low energy, table top alterative takes validity of Newtonian gravity down by five orders of magnitude and narrows the potential properties of the forces and particles that may exist beyond it by more than one hundred thousand times. Gravity resonance spectroscopy, a method developed at the Vienna University of Technology, is so sensitive that it can now be used to search for Dark Matter and Dark Energy.

Contact: Florian Aigner
florian.aigner@tuwien.ac.at
43-158-801-41027
Vienna University of Technology

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
A study in scarlet
This new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that causes the surrounding hydrogen to glow with a characteristic red hue.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Astrobiology
Odd tilts could make more worlds habitable
Pivoting planets that lean one way and then change orientation within a short geological time period might be surprisingly habitable, according to new modeling by NASA and university scientists affiliated with the NASA Astrobiology Institute.
NASA

Contact: Liz Zubritsky
Elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Astrobiology
Astronomers: 'Tilt-a-worlds' could harbor life
A fluctuating tilt in a planet's orbit does not preclude the possibility of life, according to new research by astronomers at the University of Washington, Utah's Weber State University and NASA. In fact, sometimes it helps.
NASA Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Peter Kelley
kellep@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
NASA's TRMM Satellite adds up Tropical Cyclone Ita's Australian soaking
After coming ashore on April 11, Tropical Cyclone Ita dropped heavy rainfall over the weekend that caused flooding in many areas of northeastern Australia's state of Queensland. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM gathered data on rainfall that was used to create a rainfall map at NASA.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah still raining on Philippines
Several regions in the south and central Philippines have flood advisories as the remnants of now dissipated Tropical Depression Peipah continue to linger over the country. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a look at the remnant clouds from its orbit in space on April 15.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Icarus
Saturn's rings reveal how to make a moon
Disturbances in the icy rings of Saturn have given scientists an insight into how moons are made. Writing in the journal Icarus this week, Professor Carl Murray from Queen Mary's Astronomy Unit reports that recently discovered disturbances at the very edge of Saturn's outer bright A ring result from a small icy object that formed within the ring and which may be in the process of migrating out of it. They have nicknamed the object 'Peggy.'

Contact: Neha Okhandiar
n.okhandiar@qmul.ac.uk
020-788-27927
Queen Mary, University of London

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Cosmic slurp
A 'tidal disruption' occurs when a star orbits too close to a black hole and gets usurped. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are using NSF XSEDE supercomputers Stampede and Kraken to simulate tidal disruptions to better understand the dynamics of the process. Doing so will help astronomers find many more possible candidates of tidal disruptions in sky surveys and reveal details of how stars and black holes interact.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah over Southern Philippines
Tropical Depression Peipah has been very stubborn and has moved over the southern and central Philippines bringing clouds, showers and gusty winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ita over the Coral Sea
Tropical Cyclone Ita made landfall in northeastern Queensland, Australia, on April 11 as a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, moved south and re-emerged in the Coral Sea on April 14 where NASA's TRMM and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellites captured imagery of the weakened storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Saturn's hexagon: An amazing phenomenon
An unusual structure with a hexagonal shape surrounding Saturn's north pole was spotted on the planet for the first time 30 years ago. The Planetary Sciences Group has now been able to study and measure the phenomenon and, among other achievements, establish its rotation period. What is more, this period could be the same as that of the planet itself.

Contact: Matxalen Sotillo
komunikazioa@ehu.es
Universidad del País Vasco

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Methods
New technique takes cues from astronomy and ophthalmology to sharpen microscope images
Scientists are always in search of a sharper image. The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image. New imaging technology developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus rapidly corrects for these distortions and sharpens high-resolution images over large volumes of tissue.

Contact: Jim Keeley
keeleyj@hhmi.org
301-215-8858
Howard Hughes Medical Institute