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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Astronomical Journal
NASA's Fermi finds a 'Transformer' pulsar
In late June 2013, an exceptional binary containing a rapidly spinning neutron star underwent a dramatic change in behavior never before observed. The pulsar's radio beacon vanished, while at the same time the system brightened fivefold in gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, according to measurements by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.
NASA

Contact: Francis Reddy
francis.j.reddy@nasa.gov
301-286-4453
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
NASA provides double vision on Typhoon Matmo
Two instruments aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided different views of Typhoon Matmo on its approach to Taiwan today, July 22.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite gets infrared hint on Tropical Depression 2
Infrared data gathered on the tropical low pressure area known as System 92L gave forecasters a hint that the low would become the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's second tropical depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite measures up Super Typhoon Rammasun
NASA's TRMM satellite measured up Super Typhoon Rammasun's rainfall rates, rainfall totals and cloud heights providing a look at the inner workings and aftermath of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Hubble traces the halo of a galaxy more accurately than ever before
Astronomers using the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope have probed the extreme outskirts of the stunning elliptical galaxy Centaurus A. The galaxy's halo of stars has been found to extend much further from the galaxy's centre than expected and the stars within this halo seem to be surprisingly rich in heavy elements. This is the most remote portion of an elliptical galaxy ever to have been explored.

Contact: Georgia Bladon, ESA/Hubble, Public Information Officer
gbladon@partner.eso.org
44-781-629-1261
ESA/Hubble Information Centre

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
NASA satellite sees Typhoon Matmo brush eastern Philippines
A NASA satellite captured an image of the western quadrant of Typhoon Matmo brushing over the eastern Philippines on July 20.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Transiting exoplanet with longest known year
Astronomers have discovered a transiting exoplanet with the longest known year. Kepler-421b circles its star once every 704 days. In comparison, Mars orbits our sun once every 780 days. Most of the 1,800-plus exoplanets discovered to date are much closer to their stars and have much shorter orbital periods.

Contact: Christine Pulliam
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu
617-495-7463
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Typhoon Rammasun made final landfall near China and Vietnam border
Typhoon Rammasun made landfall in southern China on July 19 bringing heavy rain and typhoon-strength winds to the south China/Vietnam border. NASA and NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an infrared image the typhoon that showed strong thunderstorms with heavy rain potential.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Tropical Storm Wali no more, but remnants soaked Hawaii
On July 19, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that Wali didn't even make it to the Big Island, but moisture associated with the storm did. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the remnant low southwest of the Big Island, and a moisture stream that extended over it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
NRL reveals new meteorological insight into mid-level clouds
At medium altitudes ranging from 6,000 feet to 20,000 feet above mean sea level, water droplets in altocumulus clouds can remain in a supercooled liquid phase that cannot be reasonably resolved in current atmospheric models. New meteorological research characterizes mid-level, mixed phase altocumulus clouds in unprecedented detail.

Contact: Daniel Parry
nrlpao@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Mysterious dance of dwarfs may force a cosmic rethink
The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not 'swarm' around larger ones like bees do but 'dance' in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding of how the universe formed and evolved. The finding, by an international team of astronomers, including professor Geraint Lewis from the University of Sydney's School of Physics, has just been announced in Nature.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-293-514-312
University of Sydney

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Astrobiology
UEA research shows oceans vital for possibility for alien life
Researchers at the University of East Anglia have made an important step in the race to discover whether other planets could develop and sustain life. New research published today in the journal Astrobiology shows the vital role of oceans in moderating climate on Earth-like planets. Until now, computer simulations of habitable climates on Earth-like planets have focused on their atmospheres. But the presence of oceans is vital for optimal climate stability and habitability.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
NASA sees powerful thunderstorms in Tropical Storm Matmo
Strong thunderstorms reaching toward the top of the troposphere circled Tropical Storm Matmo's center and appeared in a band of thunderstorms on the storm's southwestern quadrant. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed very cold temperatures that indicated the high cloud tops in the powerful storms.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
NASA sees super typhoon Rammasun eyeing landfall
Imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite captured a wide-eyed Typhoon Rammasun as it was making landfall in northern Hainan Island, China early on July 18. A rainfall analysis using another NASA satellite showed the flooding potential of the storm as it left the Philippines and headed for China. Now, Rammasun is headed for a final landfall near the northeastern border of Vietnam and China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
NASA satellite catches birth of Tropical Storm Wali near Hawaii
The first tropical cyclone of the season has formed in the Central Pacific Ocean as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. Tropical Storm Wali formed southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii, and now that it's nearing, a Flash Flood Watch has been posted for all of the islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
New material puts a twist in light
Scientists at The Australian National University have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will.

Contact: Philip Dooley
media@anu.edu.au
026-125-7979
Australian National University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Icarus
Lunar pits could shelter astronauts, reveal details of how 'man in the moon' formed
While the moon's surface is battered by millions of craters, it also has over 200 holes -- steep-walled pits that in some cases might lead to caves that future astronauts could explore and use for shelter, according to new observations from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft.
NASA

Contact: Bill Steigerwald
william.a.steigerwald@nasa.gov
301-286-5017
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Nature
Peering into giant planets from in and out of this world
Lawrence Livermore scientists for the first time have experimentally re-created the conditions that exist deep inside giant planets, such as Jupiter, Uranus and many of the planets recently discovered outside our solar system.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics
Is the universe a bubble? Let's check
Perimeter Associate Faculty member Matthew Johnson and his colleagues are working to bring the multiverse hypothesis, which to some sounds like a fanciful tale, firmly into the realm of testable science.

Contact: Eamon O'Flynn
eoflynn@perimeterinstitute.ca
519-569-7600 x5071
Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees birth of Tropical Depression 10W
The tenth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean was born as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite adds up Typhoon Rammasun's Philippines deluge
Typhoon Rammasun dropped large amounts of rainfall over the Philippines, and the TRMM satellite was used to measure it from space. Rammasun is now making its way toward Hainan Island, China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Geology
Oregon geologist says Curiosity's images show Earth-like soils on Mars
Soil deep in a crater dating to some 3.7 billion years ago contains evidence that Mars was once much warmer and wetter, says University of Oregon geologist Gregory Retallack, based on images and data captured by the rover Curiosity.

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Geology
Are ants the answer to carbon dioxide sequestration?
A 25-year-long study published in Geology on July 14th provides the first quantitative measurement of in situ calcium-magnesium silicate mineral dissolution by ants, termites, tree roots, and bare ground. This study reveals that ants are one of the most powerful biological agents of mineral decay yet observed. It may be that an understanding of the geobiology of ant-mineral interactions might offer a line of research on how to "geoengineer" accelerated carbon dioxide consumption by calcium-magnesium silicates.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
303-357-1057
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Arizona State University, US Geological Survey project yields sharpest map of Mars surface properties
The most detailed global map yet made of Martian surface properties is the result of a joint project between Arizona State University and the US Geological Survey.

Contact: Robert Burnham
robert.burnham@asu.edu
480-458-8207
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Nature
Asteroid Vesta to reshape theories of planet formation
EPFL researchers have a better understanding of the asteroid Vesta and its internal structure, thanks to numerical simulations and data from the space mission Dawn. Their findings, published today in Nature, question contemporary models of rocky planet formation, including that of Earth.

Contact: Hillary Sanctuary
hillary.sanctuary@epfl.ch
41-216-937-022
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne