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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Physical Review X
Griffith scientists propose existence and interaction of parallel worlds
Griffith University academics are challenging the foundations of quantum science with a radical new theory on parallel universes. In a paper published in the journal Physical Review X, Professor Howard Wiseman and Dr. Michael Hall from Griffith's Centre for Quantum Dynamics, and Dr. Dirk-Andre Deckert from the University of California, propose that parallel universes really exist, and that they interact. They show that such an interaction could explain everything that is bizarre about quantum mechanics

Contact: Michael Jacobson
m.jacobson@griffith.edu.au
61-040-872-7734
Griffith University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nilofar being affected by wind shear
Wind shear has kicked in and has been pushing clouds and showers away from Tropical Cyclone Nilofar's center. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image that showed the effects of the shear on Oct. 29.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Planet-forming lifeline discovered in a binary star system
Scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array have detected a streamer of dust and gas flowing from a massive outer disk toward the inner reaches of a binary star system. This never-before-seen feature may be responsible for sustaining a second, smaller disk of planet-forming material that otherwise would have disappeared long ago.

Contact: Charles Blue
cblue@nrao.edu
434-296-0314
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Applied Optics
Supersonic laser-propelled rockets
Today in Applied Optics, researchers describe a new system that integrates a laser-ablation propulsion system with the gas blasting nozzles of a spacecraft which can increase the speed of the gas flow out of the system to supersonic speeds while reducing the amount of burned fuel.

Contact: Lyndsay Meyer
lmeyer@osa.org
202-416-1435
The Optical Society

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
SciTech2014
Projecting a robot's intentions
A new spin on virtual reality helps engineers read robots' minds.
Boeing

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Planck 2013 results
Astronomy & Astrophysics is publishing a special feature of 31 articles describing the data gathered by Planck over 15 months of observations and released by ESA and the Planck Collaboration in March 2013. This series of papers presents the initial scientific results extracted from this first Planck dataset.

Contact: Dr. Jennifer Martin
aanda.paris@obspm.fr
Astronomy & Astrophysics

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Planet-forming lifeline discovered in a binary star system
For the first time, researchers using ALMA have detected a streamer of gas flowing from a massive outer disc toward the inner reaches of a binary star system. This never-before-seen feature may be responsible for sustaining a second, smaller disc of planet-forming material that otherwise would have disappeared long ago. Half of Sun-like stars are born in binary systems, meaning that these findings will have major consequences for the hunt for exoplanets.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
NASA's LRO spacecraft captures images of LADEE's impact crater
NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft has spied a new crater on the lunar surface; one made from the impact of NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer mission.
NASA

Contact: Nancy Neal-Jones
nancy.n.jones@nasa.gov
301-286-0039
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
NASA gets a stare from Cyclone Nilofar's 14 mile-wide eye
Tropical Cyclone Nilofar developed an eye on Oct. 28 that seemed to stare at NASA's Terra satellite as it passed overhead in space. Warnings are already in effect from the India Meteorological Department as Nilofar is forecast to make landfall in northwestern India.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Remnants of tropical depression soaking Central America
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Hanna on Oct. 27 when it made landfall near the northern Nicaragua and southern Honduras border.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Ana's remnants raining and gusting in British Columbia, Canada
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of post-tropical cyclone Ana's remnant clouds raining on British Columbia, Canada today, Oct. 28. Wind warnings along some coastal sections of British Columbia continued today as the storm moved through the region.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Insights into the physics of space weather that disrupts cell phones and creates Earthly havoc
The volatile 'solar wind' buffets the magnetosphere, the magnetic field that surrounds the Earth, and can whip up geomagnetic storms that disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and blackout power grids. Precise predictions of such outbursts could prompt measures to cope with them, just as forecasts here on Earth warn of approaching hurricanes and thunderstorms.

Contact: Saralyn Stewart
stewart@physics.utexas.edu
512-694-2320
American Physical Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Laser experiments mimic cosmic explosions and planetary cores
Scientists bring plasma tsunamis and crushing pressures into the lab.

Contact: Saralyn Stewart
stewart@physics.utexas.edu
512-694-2320
American Physical Society

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
NASA's SDO observes more flares erupting from giant sunspot
A large active region on the sun erupted with another X-class flare on Oct. 27, 2014 -- its fourth since Oct. 24. The flare peaked at 10:47 a.m. EDT.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Spotlighting the sun
Astronomers with the National Science Foundation-funded National Optical Astronomy Observatory captured pictures not only of Thursday's partial solar eclipse, but also of the 'monster' sized active region or sun spot that has many comparing it to one of a similar size that occurred 11 years ago.

Contact: Ivy F. Kupec
ikupec@nsf.gov
703-292-8796
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Nature
From the mouths of ... young fireballs
That is the conclusion, published in the current issue of Nature, from a research collaboration led by Georgia State University Astronomer Gail Schaefer that includes 37 researchers (many who are National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded) from 17 institutions. The researchers observed the expanding thermonuclear fireball from a nova that erupted last year in the constellation Delphinus.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ivy F. Kupec
ikupec@nsf.gov
703-292-8796
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite eyeing Tropical Cyclone Nilofar in Arabian Sea
Tropical Cyclone 04A continues to intensify and had been renamed Tropical Cyclone Nilofar when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on Oct. 27.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Satellite movie shows Tropical Storm Ana headed to British Columbia, Canada
An animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite taken over the period of Oct.19 to 26 shows the movement, intensification, weakening and movement toward British Columbia, Canada. On Oct. 27, wind warnings were posted along some coastal sections of British Columbia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
NASA sees a 'Zombie' tropical storm kick off Halloween week
NASA's Terra satellite spotted a 'zombie' tropical storm as Halloween week kicks off. Tropical Depression 9 made landfall in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula late last week and lingered as a remnant low pressure area on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 25 and 26.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Nature
First time-lapse images of exploding fireball from a 'nova' star
A team of researchers including from the University of Sydney and Georgia State University have captured images of a thermonuclear fireball exploding from a star.
National Science Foundation, Georgia State University

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-242-529-6802
University of Sydney

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Nature
Tremendously bright pulsar may be 1 of many
A newly found pulsar, the brightest ever seen, raises questions about a mysterious category of cosmic objects called ultraluminous X-ray sources. A member of the team that announced the discovery, Deepto Chakrabarty, discusses the likelihood of additional ultra-bright pulsars and considers how astrophysicists will align this new find with their understanding of how pulsars work.

Contact: James Cohen
cohen@kavlifoundation.org
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature
Georgia State astronomers image the exploding fireball stage of a nova
Astronomers at Georgia State University's Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy have observed the expanding thermonuclear fireball from a nova that erupted last year in the constellation Delphinus with unprecedented clarity.
National Science Foundation

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Hinode satellite captures X-ray footage of solar eclipse
The moon passed between the Earth and the sun on Thursday, Oct. 23. While avid stargazers in North America looked up to watch the spectacle, the best vantage point was several hundred miles above the North Pole. The Hinode spacecraft was in the right place at the right time to catch the solar eclipse. What's more, because of its vantage point Hinode witnessed a 'ring of fire' or annular eclipse.

Contact: Christine Pulliam
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu
617-495-7463
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Icarus
NASA identifies ice cloud above cruising altitude on Titan
NASA scientists have identified an unexpected high-altitude methane ice cloud on Saturn's moon Titan that is similar to exotic clouds found far above Earth's poles.
NASA

Contact: Liz Zubritsky
elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Satellite catches lingering remnants of Tropical Depression 9
NOAA's GOES-East satellite has been keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 9.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center