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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Fall in monsoon rains driven by rise in air pollution, study shows
Emissions produced by human activity have caused annual monsoon rainfall to decline over the past 50 years, a study suggests.
Natural Environmental Research Council, European Research Council, National Centre for Atmospheric Science

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-2246
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Wild ducks take flight in open cluster
The Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile has taken this beautiful image, dappled with blue stars, of one of the most star-rich open clusters currently known -- Messier 11, also known as NGC 6705 or the Wild Duck Cluster.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NASA's HS3 looks Hurricane Edouard in the eye
NASA and NOAA scientists participating in NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel mission used their expert skills, combined with a bit of serendipity on Sept. 17, 2014, to guide the remotely piloted Global Hawk over the eye of Hurricane Edouard and release a sonde that rotated within the eye as it descended and fell into the eyewall of the storm at low levels.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-285-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NASA's Swift mission observes mega flares from a mini star
On April 23, NASA's Swift satellite detected the strongest, hottest, and longest-lasting sequence of stellar flares ever seen from a nearby red dwarf star. The initial blast from this record-setting series of explosions was as much as 10,000 times more powerful than the largest solar flare ever recorded.
NASA

Contact: Francis Reddy
francis.j.reddy@nasa.gov
301-286-4453
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees Tropical Storm Phanfone fragmented
The bands of thunderstorms wrapping around Tropical Storm Phanfone in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean appeared fragmented to NASA's TRMM satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Tropical Storm Rachel dwarfed by developing system 90E
Tropical Storm Rachel is spinning down west of Mexico's Baja California, and another tropical low pressure area developing off the coast of southwestern Mexico dwarfs the tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the size difference between the two tropical low pressure areas.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Applied Physics Letters
Taking thin films to the extreme
Applying a well-known optical phenomenon called thin-film interference, a group of researchers at Harvard University has demonstrated the ability to 'paint' ultra-thin coatings onto a rough surface -- work that holds promise for making future, flexible electronic devices, creating advanced solar cells and detailing the sides of next-gen rocket ships and spacecraft with extremely lightweight decorative logos -- work described in work the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA-funded rocket has 6 minutes to study solar heating
On Sept. 30, 2014, a sounding rocket will fly up into the sky -- past Earth's atmosphere that obscures certain wavelengths of light from the sun -- for a 15-minute journey to study what heats up the sun's atmosphere. This is the fourth flight for the Very high Angular Resolution Ultraviolet Telescope, or VAULT, will launch from the White Sands Missile Range near Las Cruces, New Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Journal of Glaciology
NASA support key to glacier mapping efforts
Thanks in part to support from NASA and the National Science Foundation, scientists have produced the first-ever detailed maps of bedrock beneath glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica. This new data will help researchers better project future changes to glaciers and ice sheets, and ultimately, sea level.
NASA

Contact: George Hale
George.r.hale@nasa.gov
301-614-5853
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Nature Climate Change
NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton
The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton -- microscopic aquatic plants important for fish populations and Earth's carbon cycle.
NASA

Contact: Patrick Lynch
patrick.lynch@nasa.gov
301-286-3854
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Rachel before losing hurricane status
Tropical Storm Rachel strengthened into a hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 27-28, only to weaken back into a tropical storm by Sept. 29. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rachel before it weakened and took a visible picture of the storm off Baja California's coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kammuri winding down over open ocean
Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to appear more like a cold front on satellite imagery as it transitions into an extra-tropical storm over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone triggers warnings in Northwestern Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over newborn Tropical Storm Phanfone on Sept. 29 and captured a picture of the storm that showed thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the storm's center, and a large band of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the east. Phanfone is now a threat to various islands and warnings are in effect.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Geology
Glaciers in the Grand Canyon of Mars?
For decades, planetary geologists have speculated that glaciers might once have crept through Valles Marineris, the 2,000-mile-long chasm that constitutes the Grand Canyon of Mars. Using satellite images, researchers have identified features that might have been carved by past glaciers as they flowed through the canyons; however, these observations have remained highly controversial and contested.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Simulations reveal an unusual death for ancient stars
Certain primordial stars -- those 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our sun, or solar masses -- may have died unusually. In death, these objects -- among the universe's first generation of stars -- would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nitrogen fingerprint in biomolecules could be from early sun
The pattern of nitrogen in biomolecules like proteins, which differ greatly from that seen in other parts of the solar system, could have been generated by the interactions of light from the early sun with nitrogen gas in the nebula, long before Earth formed.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Science
New molecule found in space connotes life origins
Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. The discovery suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space.

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kammuri's spiral bands of soaking thunderstorms
Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to strengthen on its north-northwestern track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA's TRMM satellite identified a band of thunderstorms containing heavy rainfall northwest of the storm's center. Meanwhile NASA's Aqua satellite got a look at the entire storm and saw that those bands of storms circled the entire storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
NASA identifies cold cloud tops in Tropical Storm Rachel
NASA's Aqua satellite saw the area of strong thunderstorms with colder cloud tops had grown within the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Rachel.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Optical Engineering
Single-photon detection, generation, and applications featured in Optical Engineering
A new special section in the SPIE journal Optical Engineering including several open-access papers covers analysis and applications of single-photon detection technology with applications as diverse as space exploration and quantum computing. The peer-reviewed journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in print and in the SPIE Digital Library.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Suomi NPP satellite data used for mitigating aviation related volcanic hazards
A joint NOAA/NASA satellite is one of several satellites providing valuable information to aviators about volcanic hazards.
NOAA, NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Storm Kammuri coming together
When NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kammuri the VIIRS instrument aboard took a visible picture of the storm that showed bands of thunderstorms wrapped around its center. The storm appears to be coming together as circulation improves and bands of thunderstorms have been wrapping into the low-level center of circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Satellite catches an oval-shaped Tropical Storm Rachel
NOAA's GOES-West satellite spotted the eighteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific grow into a tropical storm that was renamed Rachel today, Sept. 25, 2014. Wind shear is affecting the tropical storm, however, so it doesn't have a rounded appearance on satellite imagery.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Science
Heritage of Earth's water gives rise to hopes of life on other planets
A pioneering new study has shown that water found on Earth predates the formation of the Sun -- raising hopes that life could exist on exoplanets, the planets orbiting other stars in our galaxy.

Contact: Duncan Sandes
d.sandes@exeter.ac.uk
University of Exeter

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
A galaxy of deception
Astronomers usually have to peer very far into the distance to see back in time, and view the Universe as it was when it was young. This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of galaxy DDO 68, otherwise known as UGC 5340, was thought to offer an exception. This ragged collection of stars and gas clouds looks at first glance like a recently-formed galaxy in our own cosmic neighborhood. But, is it really as young as it looks?

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
49-893-200-6855
ESA/Hubble Information Centre