EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
21-Oct-2014 20:10
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Space & Planetary


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA sees Himalayan snow from Cyclone Hudhud's remnants
When does a Tropical Cyclone drop snowfall? When it makes landfall in India and the moisture moves over the Himalayas as Cyclone Hudhud has done.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA Webb's heart survives deep freeze test
After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Space Weather
UNH scientist: Cosmic rays threaten future deep-space astronaut missions
Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, but scientists are only now beginning to understand and characterize the radiation hazards that could make such ventures risky, concludes a new paper by University of New Hampshire scientists.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Sims
david.sims@unh.edu
603-862-5369
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Ana still affecting Hawaii
Slow-moving Tropical Storm Ana was still affecting parts of Hawaii on Oct. 20 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA sees Gonzalo affect Bermuda's ocean sediment: Stirred, not shaken
NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites captured before and after images of Bermuda and surrounding waters before and after Hurricane Gonzalo struck the island on Oct. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Big black holes can block new stars
Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dennis O'Shea
dro@jhu.edu
443-997-9912
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
POLARBEAR detects B-modes in the cosmic microwave background
The POLARBEAR experiment has made the most sensitive and precise measurements yet of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and found telling twists called B-modes in the patterns, signs that this cosmic backlight has been warped by intervening structures in the universe.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
POLARBEAR seeks cosmic answers in microwave polarization
Based on measurements of B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation, BICEP2 reported last March detection of gravitational waves caused by inflation in the early universe. The POLARBEAR experiment is studying this B-mode polarization to answer other questions: what is the overall structure of matter in the universe, what are the masses of neutrinos, and what is the nature of dark matter and dark energy. New data proves the feasibility of this approach.
National Science Foundation, Simon Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
NASA's MAVEN studies passing comet and its effects
NASA's newest orbiter at Mars, MAVEN, took precautions to avoid harm from a dust-spewing comet that flew near Mars today and is studying the flyby's effects on the Red Planet's atmosphere.
NASA

Contact: Nancy Neal-Jones
nancy.n.jones@nasa.gov
301-286-0039
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
NASA's HS3 mission continues with flights over Hurricane Gonzalo
Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthened into a hurricane on Oct. 14 when it was near Puerto Rico and provided a natural laboratory for the next phase of NASA's HS3 or Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra Satellite sees Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii
Tropical Storm Ana made a slow track west of the Hawaiian islands over the last couple of days, and by Oct. 20 was moving westward away from the main Hawaiian islands and heading toward the northwest Hawaiian islands. NASA's Terra satellite caught Ana on a flyby on Oct. 19 that showed the storm's clouds blanketing the chain of islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
The quick life and death of Tropical Storm Trudy
Tropical Storm Trudy formed on Saturday, Oct. 17 and by Oct.19 the storm made landfall in southern Mexico and weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Gonzalo: First hand account in Bermuda, next stop: The United Kingdom
Hurricane Gonzalo departed from Bermuda leaving power outages, downed trees, and damaged homes and buildings. An on-the ground account of the storm indicated the eye passed over the island. By Oct. 20, post-tropical storm Gonzalo was approaching the United Kindgom, sparking severe weather warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Heavy metal frost? A new look at a Venusian mystery
enus is hiding something beneath its brilliant shroud of clouds: a first order mystery about the planet that researchers may be a little closer to solving because of a new re-analysis of twenty-year-old spacecraft data.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Satellites sees a question mark in Tropical Storm Ana
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Ana that showed the outer clouds were already reaching the big island by 11 a.m. EDT and the storm resembled a giant question mark.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Astronomical Journal
Explosion first evidence of a hydrogen-deficient supernova progenitor
A model presented by Kavli IPMU provides the first characterization of the progenitor for a hydrogen-deficient supernova. The model predicts that a bright hot star, which is the binary companion to an exploding object, remains after the explosion.Their findings have important implications for the evolution of massive stars.

Contact: James Cohen
cohen@kavlifoundation.org
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
NASA study finds 1934 had worst drought of last thousand years
A new study using a reconstruction of North American drought history over the last 1,000 years found that the drought of 1934 was the driest and most widespread of the last millennium.
NASA

Contact: Ellen Gray
ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov
301-286-1950
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Science
NASA spacecraft provides new information about sun's atmosphere
NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph has provided scientists with five new findings into how the sun's atmosphere, or corona, is heated far hotter than its surface, what causes the sun's constant outflow of particles called the solar wind, and what mechanisms accelerate particles that power solar flares.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
NASA's Hubble finds extremely distant galaxy through cosmic magnifying glass
Peering through a giant cosmic magnifying glass, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted a tiny, faint galaxy -- one of the farthest galaxies ever seen. The diminutive object is estimated to be more than 13 billion light-years away.
NASA

Contact: Ray Villard
villard@stsci.org
410-338-4514
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
NASA begins sixth year of airborne Antarctic ice change study
NASA is carrying out its sixth consecutive year of Operation IceBridge research flights over Antarctica to study changes in the continent's ice sheet, glaciers and sea ice. This year's airborne campaign, which began its first flight Thursday morning, will revisit a section of the Antarctic ice sheet that recently was found to be in irreversible decline.
NASA

Contact: George Hale
George.r.hale@nasa.gov
301-614-5853
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Science
Tiny 'nanoflares' might heat the Sun's corona
Why is the Sun's million-degree corona, or outermost atmosphere, so much hotter than the Sun's surface? This question has baffled astronomers for decades. Today, a team led by Paola Testa is presenting new clues to the mystery of coronal heating. The team finds that miniature solar flares called 'nanoflares' -- and the speedy electrons they produce -- might partly be the source of that heat, at least in some of the hottest parts of the Sun's corona.

Contact: Christine Pulliam
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu
617-495-7463
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Science
Formation and large scale confinement of jets emitted by young stars finally elucidated
An international team of scientists has succeeded in explaining the formation and propagation over astronomical distances of jets of matter emitted by young stars -- one of the most fascinating mysteries of modern astronomy. Using a patented experimental device and large-scale numerical simulations, the team obtained data consistent with astrophysical observations
French National Research Agency, NSERC, Île de France region, Triangle de la Physique-Saclay, National Science Foundation, Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-3817
INRS

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Satellites tracking Central Pacific's Tropical Storm Ana
Tropical Storm Ana continued on a path to the Hawaiian Islands as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and gathered data on the storm. NOAA's GOES-West satellite data was compiled into a movie that showed the intensification and movement of Ana. Watches are now in effect for Hawaii.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Major Hurricane Gonzalo gives an 'eye-opening' performance
NASA and NOAA satellites have been providing continuous coverage of Hurricane Gonzalo as it moves toward Bermuda. NASA's Terra satellite saw thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the center with large bands of thunderstorms wrapping into it. NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided and 'eye-opening' view of Gonzalo, still a Category 4 hurricane on Oct. 16.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Probing the past
Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope astronomers have made what may be the most reliable distance measurement yet of an object that existed in the Universe's formative years. The galaxy is one of the faintest, smallest and most distant galaxies ever seen and measuring its distance with this accuracy was possible due only to the incredibly detailed mapping of how giant galaxy clusters warp the space-time around them.

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
44-781-629-1261
ESA/Hubble Information Centre