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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature
Astrophysicists report radioactive cobalt in supernova explosion
A group of Russian astrophysicists, including researchers from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, have detected the formation of radioactive cobalt during a supernova explosion, lending credence to a corresponding theory of supernova explosions.

Contact: Alexandra O. Borissova
borissova@phystech.edu
7-498-744-6526
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics
Researchers use NASA and other data to look into the heart of a solar storm
Scientists found that the CME contained a rare piece of dense solar filament material. This filament coupled with an unusually fast speed led to the large amount of solar material observed.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA sees a weaker Tropical Storm Marie
When NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of what is now Tropical Storm Marie, weakened from hurricane status on Aug. 28, the strongest thunderstorms were located in the southern quadrant of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM analyzes Hurricane Cristobal
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it continues moving north and paralleling the US East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is now close enough to the coast to trigger high surf advisories.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite adds up Cristobal's heavy rainfall in the Caribbean
The Caribbean Islands of Turks and Caicos were drenched from Tropical Storm Cristobal before the storm moved north and intensified into a hurricane. NASA's TRMM satellite added up the rainfall and revealed the soaking those islands received.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Radio telescopes settle controversy over distance to Pleiades
A worldwide network of radio telescopes measured the distance to the famous star cluster the Pleiades to an accuracy within 1 percent. The result resolved a controversy raised by a satellite's measurement that now is shown to be wrong. The incorrect measurement had challenged standard models of star formation and evolution.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Finley
dfinley@nrao.edu
575-835-7302
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
NASA telescopes uncover early construction of giant galaxy
Astronomers have for the first time caught a glimpse of the earliest stages of massive galaxy construction. The building site, dubbed 'Sparky,' is a dense galactic core blazing with the light of millions of newborn stars that are forming at a ferocious rate.
NASA

Contact: Ray Villard
villard@stsci.edu
410-338-4514
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA begins hurricane mission with Global Hawk flight to Cristobal
The first of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, on Aug. 27 after surveying Hurricane Cristobal for the first science flight of NASA's latest hurricane airborne mission.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite sees powerful towering storms in Cristobal
NASA's TRMM satellite identified areas of heavy rainfall occurring in Hurricane Cristobal as it continued strengthening on approach to Bermuda.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA sees massive Marie close enough to affect southern California coast
Two NASA satellites captured visible and infrared pictures that show the massive size of Hurricane Marie. Marie is so large that it is bringing rough surf to the southern coast of California while almost nine hundred miles west of Baja California.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Witnessing the early growth of a giant
Astronomers have uncovered for the first time the earliest stages of a massive galaxy forming in the young Universe. The discovery was made possible through combining observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, ESA's Herschel Space Observatory, and the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. The growing galaxy core is blazing with the light of millions of newborn stars that are forming at a ferocious rate.

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
44-781-629-1261
ESA/Hubble Information Centre

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Scientist uncovers red planet's climate history in unique meteorite
Was Mars -- now a cold, dry place -- once a warm, wet planet that sustained life? Research underway at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory may one day answer those questions -- and perhaps even help pave the way for future colonization of the Red Planet. By analyzing the chemical clues locked inside an ancient Martian meteorite known as Black Beauty, Florida State University professor Munir Humayun and an international research team are revealing the story of Mars' ancient, and sometimes startling, climate history.

Contact: Munir Humayun
Humayun@magnet.fsu.edu
850-544-5740
Florida State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Orion rocks! Pebble-size particles may jump-start planet formation
Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope have discovered that filaments of star-forming gas near the Orion Nebula may be brimming with pebble-size particles -- planetary building blocks 100 to 1,000 times larger than the dust grains typically found around protostars.

Contact: Charles Blue
cblue@nrao.edu
434-296-0314
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Karina's remnants drawn into Hurricane Marie's spin
Karina finally became a remnant low pressure area after roaming around in the Eastern Pacific for two weeks. Satellite data on Aug. 27 showed that the now shapeless former hurricane was being drawn into nearby Hurricane Marie's circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
Measurement at Big Bang conditions confirms lithium problem
The field of astrophysics has a stubborn problem and it's called lithium. The quantities of lithium predicted to have resulted from the Big Bang are not actually present in stars. But the calculations are correct -- a fact which has now been confirmed for the first time in experiments conducted at the underground laboratory in the Gran Sasso mountain in Italy. As part of an international team, researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf studied how much lithium forms under Big Bang conditions.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Detecting neutrinos, physicists look into the heart of the sun
Using one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists including Andrea Pocar, Laura Cadonati and doctoral student Keith Otis at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report in the current issue of Nature that for the first time they have directly detected neutrinos created by the 'keystone' proton-proton fusion process going on at the sun's core.
National Science Foundation, Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics

Contact: Edward Blaguszewski
edblag@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
What lit up the universe?
New research from UCL shows we will soon uncover the origin of the ultraviolet light that bathes the cosmos, helping scientists understand how galaxies were built. The study published today in the Astrophysical Journal Letters by UCL cosmologists Dr. Andrew Pontzen and Dr. Hiranya Peiris, together with collaborators at Princeton and Barcelona universities, shows how forthcoming astronomical surveys will reveal what lit up the cosmos.
Royal Society, National Science Foundation, Science and Technology Facilities Council, European Research Council

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
NASA sees huge Hurricane Marie slam Socorro Island
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Marie when its eye was just to the west of Socorro Island in the Eastern Pacific.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Satellite shows Hurricane Marie about to swallow Karina
Massive Hurricane Marie appears like a giant fish about to swallow tiny Tropical Depression Karina on satellite imagery today from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites gaze into Hurricane Cristobal
NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites have been providing views of the outside and inside of Hurricane Cristobal as it heads for Bermuda. The National Hurricane Center posted a Tropical Storm Watch for Bermuda as Cristobal heads in that direction.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Best view yet of merging galaxies in distant universe
Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and many other telescopes, an international team of astronomers has obtained the best view yet of a collision that took place between two galaxies when the Universe was half its current age. They enlisted the help of a galaxy-sized magnifying glass to reveal otherwise invisible detail. These new studies of the galaxy H-ATLAS J142935.3-002836 have shown that this distant object looks like the local galaxy collision, the Antennae Galaxies.

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
44-781-629-1261
ESA/Hubble Information Centre

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Best view yet of merging galaxies in distant universe
An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array -- among other telescopes -- has obtained the best view yet of a collision between two galaxies when the Universe was only half its current age.

Contact: Charles Blue
cblue@nrao.edu
434-296-0314
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Best view yet of merging galaxies in distant universe
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, and other telescopes, an international team of astronomers has obtained the best view yet of a collision that took place between two galaxies when the Universe was half its current age. They enlisted the help of a galaxy-sized magnifying glass to reveal otherwise invisible detail. These studies of the galaxy H-ATLAS J142935.3-002836 have shown that this complex distant object looks like the local galaxy collision, the Antennae Galaxies.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
NASA sees Marie become a major hurricane, causing dangerous surf
The National Hurricane Center expected Marie to become a major hurricane (Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale) and it did. On Aug. 24, when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead, Marie reached Category 4 hurricane status and maintained strength on Aug. 25.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Former Hurricane Lowell finally fades away
Satellite data showed that Lowell had ceased its life as a tropical cyclone over the past weekend.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center