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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Advanced Material Interfaces
Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals
Nanoporous metals -- foam-like materials that have some degree of air vacuum in their structure -- have a wide range of applications because of their superior qualities.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists bind single-atom sheets with the same force geckos use to climb walls
The approach is to design synergistic materials by combining two single-atom thick sheets, for example, that act as a photovoltaic cell as well as a light-emitting diode, converting energy between electricity and radiation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A hybrid vehicle that delivers DNA
A new hybrid vehicle is under development. Its performance isn't measured by the distance it travels, but rather the delivery of its cargo: vaccines that contain genetically engineered DNA to fight HIV, cancer, influenza and other maladies. Described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the technology could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite two decades of research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security
Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGSAC Conference
Virtual money: User's identity can be revealed much easier than thought
Bitcoin is the new money: minted and exchanged on the Internet. Faster and cheaper than a bank, the service is attracting attention from all over the world. But a big question remains: are the transactions really anonymous? Researchers at the University of Luxembourg have now demonstrated how the IP address behind each transaction can be revealed with only a few computers and about €1500.

Contact: Britta Schlüter
britta.schlueter@uni.lu
352-466-644-6563
University of Luxembourg

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Energy & Environmental Science
Researchers find way to turn sawdust into gasoline
Researchers at KU Leuven's Centre for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis have successfully converted sawdust into building blocks for gasoline. Using a new chemical process, they were able to convert the cellulose in sawdust into hydrocarbon chains. These hydrocarbons can be used as an additive in gasoline, or as a component in plastics. The researchers reported their findings in the journal Energy & Environmental Science.

Contact: Bert Lagrain
bert.lagrain@biw.kuleuven.be
32-163-21627
KU Leuven

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Telecommunications Policy
Study supports free 'super Wi-Fi'
The need for the wireless transfer of data will increase significantly in the coming years. Scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology therefore propose to turn some of the TV frequencies that will become free into common property and to use it to extend existing wireless networks instead of using the frequencies for mobile communications. Their study, published in the international journal Telecommunications Policy, recommends that the additional frequencies not be marketed but made available to the population and companies at no cost.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Advanced Materials
Breakthrough in flexible electronics enabled by inorganic-based laser lift-off
A research team headed by Professor Keon Jae Lee of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at KAIST provides an easier methodology to realize high performance flexible electronics by using the Inorganic-based Laser Lift-off.

Contact: Lan Yoon
hlyoon@kaist.ac.kr
82-423-502-294
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Blu-ray disc can be used to improve solar cell performance
Who knew about Blu-ray discs? One of the best ways to store high-definition movies and television shows because of their high-density data storage, Blu-ray discs also improve the performance of solar cells, according to a new Northwestern University study. Researchers have discovered that the pattern of information written on a Blu-ray disc -- and it doesn't matter if it's Jackie Chan's 'Supercop' or the cartoon 'Family Guy' -- works very well for improving light absorption across the solar spectrum.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists could save thousands of pounds with student's DIY microscope
Expensive tests for measuring everything from sperm motility to cancer diagnosis have just been made hundreds of thousands of pounds cheaper by a Ph.D. student from Brunel University London who hacked his own microscope.

Contact: Keith Coles
keith.coles@brunel.ac.uk
Brunel University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
How does the brain react to virtual reality? Study by UCLA neuroscientists provides answer
UCLA neurophysicists studying a key brain region where Alzheimer's disease begins have discovered how the brain processes virtual reality. 'The pattern of activity in a brain region involved in spatial learning in the virtual world is completely different than in the real world,' said Mayank Mehta, a UCLA professor of physics, neurology, and neurobiology and senior author. 'We should be cautious before proceeding rapidly with millions of people using virtual reality.'

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Unmanned underwater vehicle provides first 3-D images of underside of Antarctic sea ice
A National Science Foundation-funded research team has successfully tested an autonomous underwater vehicle, AUV, that can produce high-resolution, three-dimensional maps of Antarctic sea ice. SeaBED, as the vehicle is known, measured and mapped the underside of sea-ice floes in three areas off the Antarctic Peninsula that were previously inaccessible.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists and chemists work to improve digital memory technology
A team led by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers study graphene and ammonia to develop high-speed, high-capacity random access memory.

Contact: Alexei Gruverman
alexei_gruverman@unl.edu
402-472-4788
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
BioResearch Open Access
New treatments for cancer, diabetes, and heart disease -- you may have a pig to thank
Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. A Comprehensive Review article entitled 'Current Progress of Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Biomedical Research,' describing advances in techniques to create and use pig models and their impact on the development of novel drugs and cell and gene therapies, is published in BioResearch Open Access.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Breaking with tradition: The 'personal touch' is key to cultural preservation
'Memes' transfer cultural information like rituals in much the way that genes inherit biological properties. Now a Tel Aviv University study provides insight into the building blocks of cultural replication and the different ways they're used to preserve traditional rituals and practices.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
International Journal of Communication Networks and Distributed Systems
End to end 5G for super, superfast mobile
A collaboration between NEC Electronics and several academic centers in China and Iran, is investigating how software-defined cellular networking might be used to give smart phone users the next generation of super-superfast broadband, 5G. They provide details in the International Journal of Communication Networks and Distributed Systems.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Selenium compounds boost immune system to fight against cancer
Cancer types such as melanoma, prostate cancer and certain types of leukaemia weaken the body by over-activating the natural immune system. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have now demonstrated that selenium -- naturally found in, e.g., garlic and broccoli -- slows down the immune over-response. In the long term, this may improve cancer treatment. The findings have been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Contact: Søren Skov
sosk@sund.ku.dk
45-28-75-76-79
University of Copenhagen - The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Has a possible new lead been found in the fight against neurodegenerative diseases?
Good communication between brain cells is vital for optimal health. Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene inhibit this process, thereby causing neurodegeneration and epilepsy. Fruit flies with a defect in Skywalker, the fruit fly variant of TBC1D24, are being used as a model for neurodegeneration. Researchers from VIB and KU Leuven have succeeded in completely suppressing neurodegeneration in such fruit flies, by partially inhibiting the breakdown of 'defective' proteins in brain cells.

Contact: Sooike Stoops
info@vib.be
32-924-46611
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
New method to determine antibiotic resistance fast
Scientists from Uppsala University, the Science for Life Laboratory in Stockholm and Uppsala University Hospital have developed a new method of rapidly identifying which bacteria are causing an infection and determining whether they are resistant or sensitive to antibiotics. The findings are now being published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

Contact: Dan Andersson
Dan.Andersson@imbim.uu.se
46-070-167-9077
Uppsala University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
reillymb@ucmail.uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality
A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine.
Roche, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-727-0369
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected tissue when triggered by a remote wireless signal. The silk and magnesium devices then harmlessly dissolved. This is an important step forward for future development of on-demand medical devices that can be turned on remotely to perform a therapeutic function, such as managing post-surgical infection, and then degrade in the body.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Biotechnology
New device could make large biological circuits practical
An innovation from MIT could allow many biological components to be connected to produce predictable effects.
Eni-MIT Energy Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Physics
Magnetic fields and lasers elicit graphene secret
Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf have studied the dynamics of electrons from the 'wonder material' graphene in a magnetic field for the first time. This led to the discovery of a seemingly paradoxical phenomenon in the material. Its understanding could make a new type of laser possible in the future. Their findings have been published in the scientific journal Nature Physics.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Underwater robot sheds new light on Antarctic sea ice
The first detailed, high-resolution 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice have been developed using an underwater robot. Scientists from the UK, USA and Australia say the new technology provides accurate ice thickness measurements from areas that were previously too difficult to access.

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21441
British Antarctic Survey