US Department of Energy Science News site

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
25-Oct-2014 19:00
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Technology & Engineering


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Satellite catches lingering remnants of Tropical Depression 9
NOAA's GOES-East satellite has been keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 9.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Ana still vigorous
NASA's TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA's Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the storm as it moved over open ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl'
Chemists have devised a method using DNA-based tension probes to zoom in at the molecular level and measure and map how cells mechanically sense their environments, migrate and adhere to things.

Contact: Megan McRainey
megan.mcrainey@emory.edu
404-727-6171
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stem Cells
Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, M.S., Ph.D., who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Advanced Optical Materials
Three-dimensional metamaterials with a natural bent
In a significant breakthrough, published in Advanced Optical Materials, scientists from RIKEN, in collaboration with colleagues from ITRC, NARLabs in Taiwan, have succeeded in creating a large metamaterial, up to 4 mm x 4 mm2 in size, that is essentially isotropic, using a type of metamaterial element called a split-ring resonator.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA HS3 mission Global Hawk's bullseye in Hurricane Edouard
NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission flew the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft on two missions between Sept. 11 and 15 into Hurricane Edouard and scored a bullseye by gathering information in the eye of the strengthening storm. Scientists saw how upper-level wind shear was affecting Edouard on the HS3's Global Hawk flight of the 2014 campaign over Sept. 11 and 12, and saw the hurricane strengthen during the sixth flight on Sept. 15 and 16.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Synthetic biology on ordinary paper, results off the page
Two breakthroughs clenched by Wyss scientists, paper–based synthetic gene networks and toehold switch gene regulators, could each have revolutionary impacts on synthetic biology: the former brings synthetic biology out of the traditional confinement of a living cell, the latter provides a rational design framework to enable de-novo design of both the parts and the network of gene regulation.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
ACM IMC 2014
Study: Some online shoppers pay more than others
A new study co-authored by a team of Northeastern University faculty and students has found numerous instances of price steering and discrimination on many popular e-commerce retail and travel websites. That's not necessarily a bad thing, they say -- so long as the companies are transparent.

Contact: Kara Shemin
kara.shemin@neu.edu
617-373-2802
Northeastern University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra satellite shows a more organized Tropical Storm Ana
The strong southwesterly wind shear that has been battering Tropical Storm Ana has abated and has given the storm a chance to re-organize. Ana appeared more rounded on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite as thunderstorms again circled the low-level center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biomacromolecules
NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
JBJS Case Connector
'Watch' cites concern about flexible reamer breakage during anatomic ACL reconstruction
JBJS Case Connector, an online case journal published by the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, has issued a 'Watch' regarding concerns over flexible reamer breakage during anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Flexible reamers help surgeons achieve optimal femoral-tunnel parameters, but they are prone to breakage in certain situations, as the 'Watch' article explains.

Contact: Nicola Poser
nposer@jbjs.org
781-433-1245
Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
New experiment provides route to macroscopic high-mass superpositions
University of Southampton scientists have designed a new experiment to test the foundations of quantum mechanics at the large scale.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sea turtles' first days of life: A sprint and a ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Turtle Foundation and Queen Mary University of London followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, which was primarily funded by the Kiel Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean,' local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors. The results are published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Precise and programmable biological circuits
A team led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson has developed several new components for biological circuits. These components are key building blocks for constructing precisely functioning and programmable bio-computers.

Contact: Yaakov Benenson
kobi.benenson@bsse.ethz.ch
41-613-873-338
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Waste, an alternative source of energy to petroleum
The group led by Martín Olazar, researcher in the UPV/EHU's Department of Chemical Engineering, is studying the development of sustainable refineries where it is possible to produce fuels and raw materials providing an alternative to petroleum by using biomass and other waste materials like plastics, tires, etc. Conical spouted beds are the key to the high energy efficiency of these refineries.

Contact: Matxalen Sotillo
komunikazioa@ehu.es
34-688-673-770
University of the Basque Country

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Technology
RF heating of magnetic nanoparticles improves the thawing of cryopreserved biomaterials
Successful techniques for cryopreserving bulk biomaterials and organ systems would transform current approaches to transplantation and regenerative medicine. However, while vitrified cryopreservation holds great promise, practical application has been limited to smaller systems (cells and thin tissues) due to diffusive heat and mass transfer limitations, which are typically manifested as devitrification and cracking failures during thaw. Here we leverage a clinically proven technology platform, in magnetically heated nanoparticles, to overcome this major hurdle limiting further advancement in the field of cryopreservation.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
New microscope collects dynamic images of the molecules that animate life
A new microscopy technology collects high-resolution images rapidly and minimizes damage to cells, meaning it can image the 3-D activity of molecules, cells, and embryos in fine detail over longer periods than was previously possible. Developed at Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus, the microscope enables cell and molecular biologists to produce stunning videos of biological processes across a range of sizes and time scales, from the movements of individual proteins to the development of entire animal embryos.

Contact: Jim Keeley
keeleyj@hhmi.org
301-215-8858
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP Satellite team ward off recent space debris threat
Space debris, also known as 'space junk,' is an ongoing real-life concern for teams managing satellites orbiting Earth, including NOAA-NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi NPP, satellite. It is not unusual for satellites that have the capability of maneuvering to be repositioned to avoid debris or to maintain the proper orbit.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Audrey Haar
audrey.j.haar@nasa.gov
240-684-0808
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NIST's Cloud Computing Roadmap details research requirements and action plans
NIST has published the final version of the US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, Volumes I and II. The roadmap focuses on strategic and tactical objectives to support the federal government's accelerated adoption of cloud computing.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
evelyn.brown@nist.gov
301-975-5661
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Review of Scientific Instruments
Strengthening thin-film bonds with ultrafast data collection
When studying extremely fast reactions in ultrathin materials, two measurements are better than one. A new research tool invented by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and NIST captures information about both temperature and crystal structure during extremely fast reactions in thin-film materials.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
ACS Nano
NIST offers electronics industry 2 ways to snoop on self-organizing molecules
The idea of a practical manufacturing process based on getting molecules to organize themselves in useful nanoscale shapes once seemed a little fantastic. Now the day isn't far off when your cell phone may depend on it. Two recent papers by researchers at NIST, MIT and IBM demonstrate complementary approaches to 3-D imaging of nanoscale polymer patterns for use in semiconductor lithography.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
Paralyzed patients have weaker bones and a higher risk of fractures than expected
People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BioScience
New tool identifies high-priority dams for fish survival
Scientists have identified 181 California dams that may need to increase water flows to protect native fish downstream. The screening tool, developed by the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, to select 'high-priority' dams may be particularly useful during drought years amid competing demands for water.
Natural Resources Defense Council, California Trout, Trout Unlimited, the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation, and the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program

Contact: Ted Grantham
tgrantham@usgs.gov
970-226-9386
University of California - Davis