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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Spinach could lead to alternative energy more powerful than Popeye
Spinach gave Popeye super strength, but it also holds the promise of a different power for a group of scientists: the ability to convert sunlight into a clean, efficient alternative fuel. Purdue physicists are using spinach to study the proteins involved in photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert the sun's energy into carbohydrates used to power cellular processes. Artificial photosynthesis could allow for the conversion of solar energy into renewable, environmentally friendly hydrogen-based fuels.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: Elizabeth K. Gardner
ekgardner@purdue.edu
765-494-2081
Purdue University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Matmo making second landfall in China
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Matmo when it was moving through the Taiwan Strait for its final landfall in mainland China.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Fires in the Northern Territories July 2014
Environment Canada has issued a high health risk warning for Yellowknife and surrounding area because of heavy smoke in the region due to forest fires. In the image taken by the Aqua satellite, the smoke is drifting eastward along normal wind patterns. Fire is an obvious health hazard, but the smoke that comes from fires is not quite so obvious and its effects are insidious.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Satellite shows Atlantic Tropical Depression degenerate
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured imagery of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Depression 2 is it degenerated into a tropical wave on July 23.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
ETH student develops filter for clean water around the world
An innovative filter makes it possible to purify water more quickly, simply and economically than ever before. The developers hope the device will soon play a big role development aid, and they are looking for investors to help them achieve this goal.

Contact: Media Releations ETH Zurich
mediareleations@hk.ethz.ch
41-446-324-141
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
The birth of topological spintronics
The discovery of a new material combination that could lead to a more efficient approach to computer memory and logic is the first promising indication that it may be possible to build a practical technology with a novel material known as a 'topological insulator.' The research team's results show that such a scheme can be 10 times more efficient for controlling magnetic memory or logic than any other combination of materials measured to date.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Office of Naval Research, MARCO, National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Stem Cells and Development
New method for reducing tumorigenicity in induced pluripotent stem-cell based therapies
The potential for clinical use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology for transplant-based therapeutic strategies has previously been hindered by the risk of dysregulated cell growth, specifically the development of tumors.

Contact: Kathryn Ruehle
kruehle@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Nano-sized chip "sniffs out" explosives far better than trained dogs
A groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor devised by Tel Aviv University's Professor Fernando Patolsky picks up the scent of explosives molecules better than a detection dog's nose. The device is mobile, inexpensive, and highly accurate, detecting explosives in the air at concentrations as low as a few molecules per 1,000 trillion.
Tracense

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
The geography of the global electronic waste ('e-waste') burden
As local and national governments struggle to deal with ever-growing piles of electronic waste, scientists are now refining the picture of just how much there is and where it really ends up. Published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, their study found that nearly a quarter of e-waste that developed countries discard floods into just seven developing countries -- with major potential health risks for the people who live there.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Linking television and the Internet
In the 'LinkedTV' project, researchers are seamlessly connecting TV offerings with the Internet. Audiences will benefit from an informative and personalized viewing experience.

Contact: Heike Horstmann
heike.horstmann@iais.fraunhofer.de
0049-224-114-2985
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nano Research
A crystal wedding in the nanocosmos
Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, the Vienna University of Technology and the Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Lublin have succeeded in embedding nearly perfect semiconductor crystals into a silicon nanowire. With this new method of producing hybrid nanowires, very fast and multi-functional processing units can be accommodated on a single chip in the future. The research results will be published in the journal Nano Research.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Soft Matter
The electric slide dance of DNA knots
DNA is an electrically charged molecule, and for this reason the knots that form spontaneously along the strand can be manipulated by applying electric fields, as done by Cristian Micheletti, professor at SISSA, and his team. The research paper has just been published in Soft Matter and is the first example of a technique allowing DNA knots to be driven from the outside.

Contact: Press Office
pressoffice@sissa.it
39-366-367-7586
International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA)

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Physical Review A
Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals
Physicists Sergei Filippov and Mario Ziman have found a way to preserve quantum entanglement of particles passing through an amplifier and, conversely, when transmitting a signal over long distances.

Contact: Alexandra O. Borissova
borissova@phystech.edu
7-498-744-6526
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Procedia Engineering
Minimizing drag to maximize results
In trying to better understand the aerodynamic interactions between cyclists, researchers from Monash University and the Australian Institute of Sport have studied how riders' drag was affected by the relative position of multiple cyclists.
Australian Research Centre

Contact: Glynis Smalley
glynis.smalley@monash.edu
61-408-027-848
Monash University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
K computer runs largest ever ensemble simulation of global weather
Using Japan's flagship 10-petaFLOPS K computer, researchers from the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science have succeeded in running 10,240 parallel simulations of global weather, the largest number ever performed, using data assimilation to reduce the range of uncertainties.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Astronomical Journal
NASA's Fermi finds a 'Transformer' pulsar
In late June 2013, an exceptional binary containing a rapidly spinning neutron star underwent a dramatic change in behavior never before observed. The pulsar's radio beacon vanished, while at the same time the system brightened fivefold in gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, according to measurements by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.
NASA

Contact: Francis Reddy
francis.j.reddy@nasa.gov
301-286-4453
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning
Essays in English yield information about other languages
Grammatical habits in written English reveal linguistic features of non-native speakers' languages.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
The dopamine transporter
Michelle Sahai of the Weill Cornell Medical College uses the XSEDE-allocated Stampede supercomputer to study the dopamine transporter. Stampede is ranked seventh on the Top 500 list of supercomputers. Her research links altered dopamine signaling and dopamine transporter function to neurological and psychiatric diseases including early-onset Parkinsonism, ADHD, and cocaine addiction.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Carlton Fire Complex, Washington -- July 22, 2014
The Carlton Complex fires started on July 14, 2014, by lightning from a weather system that moved through the Methow Valley.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
NASA provides double vision on Typhoon Matmo
Two instruments aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided different views of Typhoon Matmo on its approach to Taiwan today, July 22.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Science of the Total Environment
New water balance calculation for the Dead Sea
The drinking water resources on the eastern, Jordanian side of the Dead Sea could decline severe as a result of climate change than those on the western, Israeli and Palestinian side. This is the conclusion reached by an international team of researchers that calculated the water flows around the Dead Sea. The natural replenishment rate of groundwater will reduce dramatically in the future if precipitation lowers as predicted.
German Ministry of Education and Research

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
ACS Nano
NUS scientists use low cost technique to improve properties and functions of nanomaterials
By 'drawing' micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applications

Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Fire Safety Science
Fires are a major cause of wind farm failure, according to new research
Following discussion with reporters we wish to draw attention to further information relating to the News Release issued under embargo for Thursday, July 17, 2014.

Contact: Colin Smith
cd.smith@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46712
Imperial College London

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Largest genetic survey to date shows major success of giant panda breeding programs
Breeding programs in conservation centers and zoos hope to save the panda by improving genetic diversity, avoid inbreeding and ultimately, introduce pandas back to the wild. Just how are these high-profile programs doing so far? In a new study appearing in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, Fuwen Wei, et al., performed the most comprehensive genetic survey so far.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
MBEpress@gmail.com
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Optica
Self-cooling solar cells boost power, last longer
Scientists may have overcome one of the major hurdles in developing high-efficiency, long-lasting solar cells -- keeping them cool, even in the blistering heat of the noonday sun. By adding a specially patterned layer of silica glass to the surface of ordinary solar cells, a team of researchers led by Shanhui Fan, of Stanford University has found a way to let solar cells cool themselves by shepherding away unwanted thermal radiation.

Contact: Jake Lynn
optica@ecius.net
202-296-2002
The Optical Society