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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay
In a new paper, Northeastern researchers show how they've used advanced computational data science tools to demonstrate that despite global warming, we may still experience severe cold snaps due to increasing variability in temperature extremes.

Contact: Emily Bhatti
e.bhatti@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Spin-based electronics: New material successfully tested
Spintronics is a new field of electronics, using electron spin rather than motion. This technology requires insulating components that can control this quantum property. Scientists have shown experimentally that a novel material shows all the required properties.
Sino-Swiss Science and Technology Cooperation, Swiss National Science Foundation, MOST, Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
New catalyst converts carbon dioxide to fuel
Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago have synthesized a catalyst that improves their system for converting waste carbon dioxide into syngas, a precursor of gasoline and other energy-rich products, bringing the process closer to commercial viability.
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, National Science Foundation, University of Illinois at Chicago, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Revolutionary microshutter technology hurdles significant challenges
NASA technologists have hurdled a number of significant technological challenges in their quest to improve an already revolutionary observing technology originally created for the James Webb Space Telescope.
NASA

Contact: Lori Keesey
lori.j.keesey@nasa.gov
865-244-6658
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature
NASA-funded X-ray instrument settles interstellar debate
New findings from a NASA-funded instrument have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky. Thanks to refurbished detectors first flown on a NASA sounding rocket in the 1970s, astronomers have now confirmed the long-held suspicion that much of this glow stems from a region of million-degree interstellar plasma known as the local hot bubble, or LHB.
NASA

Contact: Francis Reddy
Francis.j.reddy@nasa.gov
301-286-4453
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees developing Tropical Storm Halong causing warning
NASA infrared satellite data revealed that Tropical Storm Halong is surrounded by strong thunderstorms and an eye appears to be developing.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
American Political Science Review
Study: Contrary to image, city politicians do adapt to voters
Urban politicians in the US are responsive to voters' views, regardless of the form of government.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
SIGGRAPH 2014
ACM Transactions on Graphics
Vision-correcting display makes reading glasses so yesterday
Researchers at UC Berkeley are developing vision-correcting displays that can compensate for a viewer's visual impairments to create sharp images without the need for glasses or contact lenses. The technology could potentially help those who currently need corrective lenses to use their smartphones, tablets and computers, and could one day aid people with more complex visual problems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Cell tower rain gauges, lightning channels, North Sea storm surge
This week from AGU: Cell phone tower rain gauges, lightning channels, North Sea storm surge.

Contact: Alexandra Branscombe
abranscombe@agu.org
202-777-7516
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees warmer cloud tops as Tropical Storm Hernan degenerates
Tropical Storm Hernan degenerated into a remnant low pressure area on July 29. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed cloud tops were warming as the storm weakened.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
A new way to make microstructured surfaces
A team of researchers has created a new way of manufacturing microstructured surfaces that have novel three-dimensional textures. These surfaces, made by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes, could exhibit a variety of useful properties -- including controllable mechanical stiffness and strength, or the ability to repel water in a certain direction.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Applied Clinical Informatics
Study: Pediatric preventive care guidelines need retooling for computerized format
In a new study published in Applied Clinical Informatics, researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine and the Regenstrief Institute report that substantial work lies ahead to convert the American Academy of Pediatrics' Bright Future's guidelines into computerized prompts for physicians, but the payoff has the potential to significantly benefit patients from birth to age 21.
Indiana University Health Values Fund for Research

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Tough foam from tiny sheets
Tough, ultralight foam of atom-thick sheets can be made to any size and shape through a chemical process invented at Rice University.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mike Williams
mikewilliams@rice.edu
713-348-6728
Rice University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Optimum inertial self-propulsion design for snowman-like nanorobot
Swimming microorganisms are subjected to relatively small inertial forces compared to the viscous forces exerted by the surrounding fluid. Such low-level inertia makes self-propulsion a major challenge. Scientists have found that the direction of propulsion made possible by such inertia is opposite to that induced by a viscoelastic fluid. This study published in EPJ E could help optimise the design of self-propelled micro- and nano-scale artificial swimming machines to improve their mobility in medical applications.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Wildfires continue near Yellowknife, Canada
The wildfires that have been plaguing the Northern Territories in Canada and have sent smoke drifting down to the Great Lakes in the US continue on.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Chemistry
New method provides researchers with efficient tool for tagging proteins
With a new method, researchers use a piece of DNA engineered to bind to metal ions. Using this 'control stick,' they direct another piece of DNA to a metal binding site on the protein.

Contact: Christian B. Rosen
crosen@chem.au.dk
Aarhus University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Worldwide water shortage by 2040
Water is used around the world for the production of electricity, but new research results show that there will not be enough water in the world to meet demand by 2040 if the energy and power situation does not improve before then.

Contact: Benjamin Sovacool
benjaminso@hih.au.dk
45-87-16-69-15
Aarhus University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Astronomers measure weight of galaxies, expansion of universe
Astronomers at the University of British Columbia have collaborated with international researchers to calculate the precise mass of the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies, dispelling the notion that the two galaxies have similar masses.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
New gadget helps the vision-impaired to read graphs
People who are blind can now read more than just words, such as graphs and graphics, following the development of an affordable digital reading system by Curtin University researchers.

Contact: Megan Meates
megan.meates@curtin.edu.au
61-892-664-241
Curtin University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
The quantum Cheshire cat: Scientists separate a particle from its properties
The quantum Cheshire cat: Can a particle be separated from its properties? On July 29, the prestigious journal, Nature Communications, published the results of the first Cheshire Cat experiment, separating a neutron from its magnetic field, conducted by Chapman University in Orange, Calif., and Vienna University of Technology.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
PLOS Medicine
Urbanization of rural Africa associated with increased risk of heart disease and diabetes
The increasing urbanization of rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa could lead to an explosion in incidences of heart disease and diabetes, according to a new study carried out in Uganda which found that even small changes towards more urban lifestyles was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.
African Partnership for Chronic Disease Research

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
PLOS Medicine
Small increases in Ugandan urbanicity tied to CVD risk factors
Urban dwellers tend to have higher risk for cardiovascular diseases than people living in more rural locations. In a new study published in PLOS Medicine, Johanna Riha and colleagues have found that even within rural communities in Uganda that all lacked paved roads and running water, people living in villages with relatively more urban features were more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular diseases such as physical inactivity, and high body mass index, even after controlling for socioeconomic status.
UK Medical Research Council

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
eLife
New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases
University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body's normal proteins into a state that's linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig's disease.

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Hernan near Mexico's Baja California
Tropical Storm Hernan developed over this past weekend and reached hurricane strength before vertical wind shear kicked in and kicked the storm down. NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hernan when it was developing as a tropical depression near Baja California, Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Booming mobile health app market needs more FDA oversight for consumer safety, confidence
While the mobile health apps market offers tremendous potential, several health law experts say in a July 24 New England Journal of Medicine report that more oversight is needed by the US Food and Drug Administration to ensure consumer confidence and safety. Out of 100,000 mHealth apps on the market, only about 100 have been cleared by the FDA, which opponents see as a deterrent to innovation and profit. But it doesn't have to be.

Contact: Denise Gee
dgee@smu.edu
214-768-7658
Southern Methodist University