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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials
Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials. This new strategy gives faster feedback on what growth schemes are best, thus shortening the timeframe to manufacture a new, stable material for energy transport and conversion applications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Cristobal racing through North Atlantic
Satellite imagery shows Hurricane Cristobal racing through the North Atlantic on Friday, August 29 while losing its tropical characteristics.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050
It is possible to significantly reduce water scarcity in just over 35 years, according to researchers from McGill University and Utrecht University. In a new paper in Nature Geoscience, they outline strategies in six key areas that they believe can be combined in different ways in different parts of the world in order to effectively reduce water stress by 2050.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
NASA animation shows Hurricane Marie winding down
NOAA's GOES-West satellite keeps a continuous eye on the Eastern Pacific and has been covering Hurricane Marie since birth. NASA's GOES Project uses NOAA data and creates animations and did so to show the end of Hurricane Marie.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature
Leading Ebola researcher at UTMB says there's an effective treatment for Ebola
A leading US Ebola researcher from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has gone on record stating that a blend of three monoclonal antibodies can completely protect monkeys against a lethal dose of Ebola virus up to five days after infection, at a time when the disease is severe. Thomas Geisbert, professor of microbiology and immunology, has written an editorial for Nature discussing advances in Ebola treatment research.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@gmail.com
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
China's reform of R&D budget management doesn't go far enough
China's budget management is lagging behind countries which spend similar amounts on research and development, and recent reform has not gone far enough. That is the view of the University of Nottingham's Dr. Cong Cao, whose research is published on Aug. 29, 2014, in the prestigious academic journal, Science.
European Union's 7th Framework Program

Contact: Dr. Cong Cao
cong.cao@nottingham.ac.uk
44-115-846-7972
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Mice study shows efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures
New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the Aug. 29 issue of PLOS ONE.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Rushmie A Nofsinger
rushmie.nofsinger@tufts.edu
508-839-7910
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
Breakthrough in light sources for new quantum technology
One of the most promising technologies for future quantum circuits are photonic circuits, i.e. circuits based on light (photons) instead of electrons (electronic circuits). First, it is necessary to create a stream of single photons and control their direction. Researchers around the world have made all sorts of attempts to achieve this, but now scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute have succeeded in creating a steady stream of photons emitted one at a time and in a particular direction.

Contact: Gertie Skaarup
skaarup@nbi.dk
45-28-75-06-20
University of Copenhagen - Niels Bohr Institute

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Real tremors, or drug-seeking patient? New app can tell
New University of Toronto smartphone uses data from built-in accelerometer to measure the frequency of alcohol withdrawal tremors.

Contact: Marit Mitchell
marit.mitchell@utoronto.ca
416-978-7997
University of Toronto

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics
Researchers use NASA and other data to look into the heart of a solar storm
Scientists found that the CME contained a rare piece of dense solar filament material. This filament coupled with an unusually fast speed led to the large amount of solar material observed.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication
Socially-assistive robots help kids with autism learn by providing personalized prompts
In a pilot study led by Maja Mataric at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, researchers found that children with autism spectrum disorders showed improved or maintained performance in learning imitative behavior by interacting with humanoid robots that provided graded cueing, an occupational therapy technique that shapes behavior by providing increasingly specific cues to help a person learn new skills.
NSF/Human-Centered Computing, NSF/CISE Research Infrastructure

Contact: Megan Hazle
hazle@usc.edu
213-821-1887
University of Southern California

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA sees a weaker Tropical Storm Marie
When NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of what is now Tropical Storm Marie, weakened from hurricane status on Aug. 28, the strongest thunderstorms were located in the southern quadrant of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Global Journal of Medical Research
Are cigarette substitutes a safe alternative? It depends on user habits
A recent literature review study by researchers at the University of Miami suggest that small dosages of nicotine found in cigarette substitutes could be harmful to human musculoskeletal system, due to overuse. The findings are reported in the Global Journal of Medical Research.

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Watching the structure of glass under pressure
Glass has many applications that call for different properties, such as resistance to thermal shock or to chemically harsh environments. Glassmakers commonly use additives such as boron oxide to tweak these properties by changing the atomic structure of glass. Now researchers at UC Davis have for the first time captured atoms in borosilicate glass flipping from one structure to another as it is placed under high pressure.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
A new, tunable device for spintronics
Recently, the research group of Professor Jairo Sinova from the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in collaboration with researchers from the UK, Prague, and Japan, has for the first time realised a new, efficient spin-charge converter based on the common semiconductor material GaAs. These results have recently been published in the journal Nature Materials.

Contact: Jairo Sinova
sinova@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-21284
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM analyzes Hurricane Cristobal
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it continues moving north and paralleling the US East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is now close enough to the coast to trigger high surf advisories.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite adds up Cristobal's heavy rainfall in the Caribbean
The Caribbean Islands of Turks and Caicos were drenched from Tropical Storm Cristobal before the storm moved north and intensified into a hurricane. NASA's TRMM satellite added up the rainfall and revealed the soaking those islands received.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Pharmaceutics
Sensory-tested drug-delivery vehicle could limit spread of HIV, AIDS
A unique method for delivering compounds that could positively impact the global battle against HIV and AIDS may be possible, thanks to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits
A new research platform uses a laser to measure the 'nanomechanical' properties of tiny structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach likely to yield insights to improve designs for microelectronics and batteries.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
European Physical Journal B
Inter-dependent networks stress test
Energy production systems are good examples of complex systems. Their infrastructure equipment requires ancillary sub-systems structured like a network -- including water for cooling, transport to supply fuel, and ICT systems for control and management. Every step in the network chain is interconnected with a wider network and they are all mutually dependent. Gaihua Fu and colleagues have studied various aspects of inter-network dependencies, not previously explored, and their findings have been published in EPJ B.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Canadians rank highly when it comes to public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement
A new expert panel report, Science Culture: Where Canada Stands, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies, helps to paint the clearest picture of Canada's science culture and science culture support system in 25 years. The expert panel who conducted the assessment found Canadians excel in public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement; however they also determined there is room for improvement in some areas, including skills development.

Contact: Cathleen Meechan
cathleen.meechan@scienceadvice.ca
613-567-5000 x228
Council of Canadian Academies

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature
Quantum physics enables revolutionary imaging method
Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, the Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, and the University of Vienna have developed a fundamentally new quantum imaging technique with strikingly counter-intuitive features. For the first time, an image has been obtained without ever detecting the light that was used to illuminate the imaged object, while the light revealing the image never touches the imaged object.

Contact: Gabriela Barreto Lemos
gabriela.barreto.lemos@univie.ac.at
43-699-192-55014
University of Vienna

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Lab on a Chip
Nanoscale assembly line
ETH researchers have realized a long-held dream: inspired by an industrial assembly line, they have developed a nanoscale production line for the assembly of biological molecules.

Contact: Viola Vogel
viola.vogel@hest.ethz.ch
41-446-320-887
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells
Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters -- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream -- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center.
Janssen Diagnostics, Stand Up to Cancer, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, National Foundation for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, ESSCO Breast Cancer Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital