IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of Pathology
Finnish team of researchers finds a mutation in a tumor of the jaw
A Finnish team of researchers was the first in the world to discover a gene mutation in ameloblastoma, which is a tumor of the jaw. Researchers have been searching for the mutation that causes ameloblastoma for decades, and this mutation has now been found in a patient living in the eastern part of Finland.

Contact: Kristiina Heikinheimo
krihei@uef.fi
358-505-642-669
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Breast cancer replicates brain development process
New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.
United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Neoplasia
New study helps to explain why breast cancer often spreads to the lung
New research led by Alison Allan, Ph.D., a scientist at Western University and the Lawson Health Research Institute, shows why breast cancer often spreads or metastasizes to the lung. The breast cancer stem cell (CSC) has been shown to be responsible for metastasis in animal models, particularly to the lung. And this new research found CSCs have a particular propensity for migrating towards and growing in the lung because of certain proteins found there.
Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation-Ontario Region

Contact: Kathy Wallis
kwallis3@uwo.ca
519-661-2111 x81136
University of Western Ontario

Latest Multimedia

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light (3 of 3)

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light (3 of 3)
This is a timelapse video of a human breast cancer cell treated with a clinically relevant dose of the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel. Instead of dividing in two directions to produce identical progeny...

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light (2 of 3)

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light (2 of 3)
Clinically relevant doses of the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel induce formation of multipolar spindles in breast cancer cells. Red shows alpha-tubulin. Blue shows DNA. This image relates to a paper ...

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light (1 of 3)

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light (1 of 3)
Breast cancer cells treated with clinically relevant doses of the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel undergo abnormal divisions and produce aberrant progeny. This image relates to a paper that appeared in ...

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

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