IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

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Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Michelle Potter
mpotter8@jhmi.edu
410-614-2914
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer
The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 17, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, April 17, 2014 in the JCI: 'Double-stapled peptide inhibits RSV infection,' 'Fibroblast-derived exosomes mediate caridiomyocyte hypertrophy via microRNA delivery,' 'Patient response to cryptococcosis is dependent on fungal-specific factors,' 'The coinhibitory receptor PD-1H suppresses T cell responses,' 'Type-1 angiotensin receptors on macrophages ameliorate IL-1 receptor-mediated kidney fibrosis,' and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
919-265-3506
Journal of Clinical Investigation

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