IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

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Dr. Martha Goetsch, Oregon Health & Science University

Dr. Martha Goetsch, Oregon Health & Science University
Martha Goetsch, M.D., M.P.H., is an adjunct assistant professor in the Oregon Health & Science University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Contact: Ariane Le Chevallier
holma@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University

Stimulated Raman Scattering Imaging of Glucose Uptake Activity

Stimulated Raman Scattering Imaging of Glucose Uptake Activity
Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging of glucose uptake activity by targeting the alkyne tag of a novel glucose analogue in live mouse brain hippocampal neurons and tumor tissues (in red).

Contact: Wei Min
wm2256@columbia.edu
212-851-9433
Columbia University

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Photo shows cells from acute myeloid leukemia.

Contact: Bonnie Ward
bjward@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

TOPLESS

TOPLESS
The tetrameric TOPLESS complex with the EAR motif peptides bound at its repressor-peptide binding grooves. The repressor peptides are shown as a ball presentation.

Contact: Beth Hinshaw Hall
Beth.HinshawHall@vai.org
616-234-5519
Van Andel Research Institute

MAGI

MAGI
Brown University computer scientists have developed a new interactive tool to help researchers and clinicians explore the genetic underpinnings of cancer. The tool -- dubbed MAGI, for Mutation ...

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

<em>Aplidium albicans</em>

Aplidium albicans
The marine anticancer compound APLIDIN was obtained from the tunicate Aplidium albicans, which is found in the Balearic Islands.

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Are We Getting Good Value from High-Priced Drugs?

Are We Getting Good Value from High-Priced Drugs?
ICER: Providing independent analysis on drug pricing linked to patient benefit. Visit www.icer-review.org.

Contact: Jemma Weymouth
jweymouth@burness.com
301-280-5706
Burness Communications

Lymph Flow

Lymph Flow
Lymph flow drives development of lymphatic valves in collecting lymphatic vessels in the embryonic mouse mesentery. Two transcription factors: PROX1 (green) and FOXC2 (red) are highly unregulated in ...

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Karawinna

Karawinna
This is Karawinna, a one-year old devil taken at Cradle Mountain.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Hanhah Siddle Lab

Hanhah Siddle Lab
This is Dr Hannah Siddle.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Hannah Siddle

Hannah Siddle
This is Dr Hannah Siddle.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Cancer Therapy

Cancer Therapy
A new delivery system for protective polyphenols like resveratrol may have value in cancer chemotherapy.

Contact: Adam Alani
adam.alani@oregonstate.edu
503-346-4702
Oregon State University

Accessory Proteins and Metephase Chromosomes

Accessory Proteins and Metephase Chromosomes
A) Shelterin recruits accessory proteins to the telomeres that facilitate the complex process of telomere copying and maintenance associated with cell multiplication. B) Representative images of ...

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Making customized T Cells

Making customized T Cells
This is a graphic showing a process for producing large numbers of activated, customized T cells using magnetic nanoparticles and a column.

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Cell Uptake

Cell Uptake
The cells in this image have turned fluorescent pink, showing that the new drug delivery system results in high cellular uptake after being irradiated by near infrared light.

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

TEM Nanoparticles

TEM Nanoparticles
This image, taken using a transmission electron microscope, shows: (A) a bare nanoparticle, (B) a nanoparticle prepared for coating and (C) a nanoparticle coated with a thin layer of drug-delivering ...

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Mesh

Mesh
A 3-D view of the mesh: microtubules (green tubes) of the mitotic spindle are held together by a yellow network, the mesh.

Contact: Nicola Jones
N.Jones.1@warwick.ac.uk
44-247-615-0868
University of Warwick

X-Ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Unlocks Graphene's Cancer-Treating Potential

X-Ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Unlocks Graphene's Cancer-Treating Potential
Elise Ramleth Østli and Ph.D. candidate Federico Mazzola of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) check their experiment. As part of her master's project at NTNU, Elise ...

Contact: Justin Wells
justin.wells@ntnu.no
47-735-93428
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Neutrophils Induce Bleeding

Neutrophils Induce Bleeding
These time-lapse images of inflamed tissue in mice reveal that bleeding (red arrowheads) occurs exactly at the sites where neutrophils traverse the blood vessel wall (white arrowheads).

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Research Links Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy with  Liver Cancer and Other Diseases Later in Life

Research Links Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy with Liver Cancer and Other Diseases Later in Life
ICP is associated with hepatobiliary diseases that might predispose to cancer and also with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Women with ICP have increased risk of later hepatobiliary cancer and ...

Contact: Sybrand Boer Iwema
hmsmedia@elsevier.com
31-204-852-781
Elsevier Health Sciences

Jagged Ligands

Jagged Ligands
New research at Rice University shows how tumors create chaos in the development of neighboring blood vessels, causing them to grow too quickly and not form properly. The notch signaling pathway that ...

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Mitotic Spindle Apparatus

Mitotic Spindle Apparatus
Mitotic spindle apparatus preparing for chromosome segregation: an unaligned chromosome activates the checkpoint (green) and thereby prevents premature segregation.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Microfabricated Device

Microfabricated Device
A microfabricated device developed by the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine is able to analyze the effects of pro-drugs -- substances transformed within the liver into ...

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Glioblastoma

Glioblastoma
Non-tumorigenic glioblastoma cells (left) can spontaneously acquire cancer stem cell characteristics (right).

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

<I>Conus episcopatus</I>

Conus episcopatus
This is a Conus episcopatus snail.

Contact: Gemma Ward
g.ward1@uq.edu.au
61-733-462-155
University of Queensland

Photostatin Added to Human Cancer Cell Line

Photostatin Added to Human Cancer Cell Line

Video shows a single cell from a human cancer cell line which is fluorescently labeled on the growing tips of its microtubules, revealing where these microtubules are being built up. At the ...

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Photostatin Exposure Comparison

Photostatin Exposure Comparison
This photo shows incubated human cancer cell lines in cell culture, treated with our photostatin. Note the contrast in cell fate for those kept in the dark (left) versus those exposed to brief pulses ...

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Trifunctional Antibody

Trifunctional Antibody
This image shows a trifunctional antibody.

Contact: Dr. Ralph Mocikat
Mocikat@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-1302
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Media Overall Survival for Patients with Stage 4 Colorectal Cancer

Media Overall Survival for Patients with Stage 4 Colorectal Cancer
A Duke Medicine study found that that thinner Stage 4 colorectal cancer patients lived an average of two-and-a-half months less than obese patients.

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Thin Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Shorter Survival Than Obese Patients

Thin Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Shorter Survival Than Obese Patients
A Duke Medicine study found that thinner Stage 4 colorectal cancer patients lived an average of two-and-a-half months less than obese patients. Lead author Yousuf Zafar, M.D., explains the findings.

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Taiman and Yorkie Drive Growth in Wing Imaginal Discs

Taiman and Yorkie Drive Growth in Wing Imaginal Discs
Taiman, needed for ecdysone response, and Hippo pathway member Yorkie drive growth in Drosophila wing imaginal discs. Note massive expansion in Tai + Yki. Green marks the posterior compartment (...

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Raman Cancer

Raman Cancer

This sequence of atomic force microscope (AFM) images shows before and after effects of inhibiting the function of a key protein in breast cancer cells. Researchers who developed a high-speed form ...

Contact: emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Cell Division is Handicapped with a Single Centriole

Cell Division is Handicapped with a Single Centriole
A cell with only one centriole has a hard time lining up its chromosomes in the middle and pulling them apart. It takes it five times as long as a healthy cell.

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Centriole Numbers Drop After Centriole Duplication Is Halted

Centriole Numbers Drop After Centriole Duplication Is Halted
After cells are treated with auxin to prevent centriole duplication, the number of centrioles (green dots) per cell is halved with each cell division. The number of days of auxin treatment is shown at...

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Normal Cell Division

Normal Cell Division
A healthy cell quickly lines up its chromosomes in the middle and then pulls them apart into what will become two new cells after division is complete. The chromosomes open up and decondense after ...

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Human Colonic Crypts

Human Colonic Crypts
Normal human colonic crypts are pictured. SMOC-2 expression (red) in the colonic stem cells demonstrates that these cells are localized in the bottoms of the crypts. Bars represent 100 micrometers (...

Contact: Yael Edelman
yael.edelman@weizmann.ac.il
Weizmann Institute of Science

How Wounds Healing Influences Cancer

How Wounds Healing Influences Cancer
The neutrophils (red) swarm around nearby precancerous cells (green) where they trigger cell division and progression of melanoma.

Contact: Barry Whyte
barry.whyte@embo.org
EMBO

Magnolia Tree Harbors Anti-Cancer Compound

Magnolia Tree Harbors Anti-Cancer Compound
Honokiol, a compound derived from the bark of the magnolia tree, is proving to be a potent cancer fighter in lab studies.

Contact: Jeffrey Hester
Jeffrey.Hester@va.gov
205-558-4744
Veterans Affairs Research Communications

A New Electrochemical Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer

A New Electrochemical Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer
Caltech chemists were able to electrochemically measure the activity of the most abundant human methyltransferase, DNMT1, from crude tumor tissue or healthy tissue. They consistently observed more ...

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

A New Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer

A New Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer
Caltech researchers used a DNA-modified, two working-electrode array to measure methyltransferase activity from tissue samples.They consistently observed more activity in tumorous tissue samples than ...

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Re-Timer Glasses

Re-Timer Glasses
Grace Dean will conduct a pilot study to determine whether glasses that shine light into the wearer's eyes is effective in treating insomnia among lung cancer patient.

Contact: Marcene Robinson
marcener@buffalo.edu
716-645-4595
University at Buffalo

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (2 of 2)

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (2 of 2)
Salk Institute and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute created a compound that stops a cellular recycling process to target cancer.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
858-453-4100
Salk Institute

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (1 of 2)

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (1 of 2)
Cell recycling (shown in green) is elevated in lung cancer cells treated with an established cancer drug. Recycling is suppressed upon co-treatment with a newly discovered enzyme inhibitor.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
858-453-4100
Salk Institute

Protein=Protein Interaction

Protein=Protein Interaction
Immune checkpoints induce their action through a complex network of protein-protein interactions. For example, the PD-1 pathway starts with a specific binding between the PD-1 receptor and either of ...

Contact: Sandra Pysklywyc
sandrapysk@ualberta.ca
780-492-0662
University of Alberta

The Telomere G-Tail Length in Healthy Individuals and Patients

The Telomere G-Tail Length in Healthy Individuals and Patients
The telomere G-tail shortening might cause endothelial dysfunction and age-related white matter change.

Contact: Norifumi Miyokawa
pr-research@office.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Hiroshima University

Microscopic Image of Fibroblast Cells

Microscopic Image of Fibroblast Cells
Microarray image overlaid with brightfield microscopy of fibroblasts probed using digital microfluidic immunocytochemistry in single cells.

Contact: RJ Taylor
rj.taylor@utoronto.ca
416-978-4498
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

Digital Microfluidics in Action

Digital Microfluidics in Action
GIF depicting passive dispensing of three successive 1.8-microliter droplets to a virtual microwell.

Contact: RJ Taylor
rj.taylor@utoronto.ca
416-978-4498
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

Targeting Telomeres, the Timekeepers of Cells, Could Improve Chemotherapy

Targeting Telomeres, the Timekeepers of Cells, Could Improve Chemotherapy
In an unexpected finding, the Salk Institute and collaborators show how disabling telomere protection during cell division prompts cell death.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Disabled Protection of Telomeres during Mitosis Causes Cell Death

Disabled Protection of Telomeres during Mitosis Causes Cell Death
Salk researchers show how the disabled protection of ends of chromosomes (blue) called telomeres (green) during cell division (mitosis) prompts cell death. This happens when the telomere-protecting ...

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Disabling Telomere Protection during Cell Division Prompts Cell Death

Disabling Telomere Protection during Cell Division Prompts Cell Death
During mitosis, a cell's chromosomes (blue) rapidly divide. When the ends of chromosomes called telomeres (green) are no longer protected by the protein TRF2, the cell receives a signal (red) to ...

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

DNA Nucleotides

DNA Nucleotides
Short inverted repeat sequences of DNA nucleotides are enriched at human cancer breakpoints.

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

The CNIO Launches a Video to Promote Citizen Participation in Cancer Research

The CNIO Launches a Video to Promote Citizen Participation in Cancer Research
Six months after the launch of the philanthropic campaign 'CNIO Friends: more research, less cancer', the Centre honors its donors in a video designed to promote individual philanthropy in cancer ...

Contact: Vanessa Pombo
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Surface Sampling Probe

Surface Sampling Probe
Oak Ridge National Laboratory's new droplet-based surface sampling probe speeds the process of analyzing a liver biopsy sample.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Biomedical Breakthrough Team

Biomedical Breakthrough Team
University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Prabuddha Mukherjee, left, bioengineering professors Rohit Bhargava and Dipanjan Pan, and postdoctoral researcher Santosh Misra, right, report the ...

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University
Helmholtz International Fellow Award for the immunologist and cancer researcher Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI), Israel together with Professor Thomas Sommer, ...

Contact: Barbara Bachtler
bachtler@mdc-berlin.de
49-309-406-3896
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association

DPP4 Inhibition Blocks Tumor Growth

DPP4 Inhibition Blocks Tumor Growth
Histological section of two mouse melanomas -- (a) untreated and (b) treated with sitagliptin, a specific DPP4 inhibitor. Stain: hematoxylin and eosin; scale bar: 500 mm.

Contact: Myriam Rebeyrotte
presse@pasteur.fr
Institut Pasteur

Graph

Graph
This graph shows the likelihood of diagnosing a lung cancer manifesting in a nonsolid nodule, sepa¬rately in the baseline (blue) and annual repeat (red) rounds of CT screening.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

CT Images

CT Images
These CT images in a 68-year-old smoker show (a) a nonsolid nodule (17 3 13 mm) in the left upper lobe at baseline screening, (b) the nodule remained nonsolid at follow-up 2 years later, and (c) a ...

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Medical Lasers

Medical Lasers
Medical laser technology innovations provide new, less-invasive light-based treatments.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Golgi Apparatus

Golgi Apparatus
Cells stained orange to illuminate the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, the parts of the cell where the enzyme FAM20C might phosphorylate other proteins.

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

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