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Trifunctional Antibody

Trifunctional Antibody
This image shows a trifunctional antibody.

Contact: Dr. Ralph Mocikat
Mocikat@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-1302
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Media Overall Survival for Patients with Stage 4 Colorectal Cancer

Media Overall Survival for Patients with Stage 4 Colorectal Cancer
A Duke Medicine study found that that thinner Stage 4 colorectal cancer patients lived an average of two-and-a-half months less than obese patients.

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Thin Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Shorter Survival Than Obese Patients

Thin Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Shorter Survival Than Obese Patients
A Duke Medicine study found that thinner Stage 4 colorectal cancer patients lived an average of two-and-a-half months less than obese patients. Lead author Yousuf Zafar, M.D., explains the findings.

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Taiman and Yorkie Drive Growth in Wing Imaginal Discs

Taiman and Yorkie Drive Growth in Wing Imaginal Discs
Taiman, needed for ecdysone response, and Hippo pathway member Yorkie drive growth in Drosophila wing imaginal discs. Note massive expansion in Tai + Yki. Green marks the posterior compartment (...

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Raman Cancer

Raman Cancer

This sequence of atomic force microscope (AFM) images shows before and after effects of inhibiting the function of a key protein in breast cancer cells. Researchers who developed a high-speed form ...

Contact: emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Human Colonic Crypts

Human Colonic Crypts
Normal human colonic crypts are pictured. SMOC-2 expression (red) in the colonic stem cells demonstrates that these cells are localized in the bottoms of the crypts. Bars represent 100 micrometers (...

Contact: Yael Edelman
yael.edelman@weizmann.ac.il
Weizmann Institute of Science

How Wounds Healing Influences Cancer

How Wounds Healing Influences Cancer
The neutrophils (red) swarm around nearby precancerous cells (green) where they trigger cell division and progression of melanoma.

Contact: Barry Whyte
barry.whyte@embo.org
EMBO

Magnolia Tree Harbors Anti-Cancer Compound

Magnolia Tree Harbors Anti-Cancer Compound
Honokiol, a compound derived from the bark of the magnolia tree, is proving to be a potent cancer fighter in lab studies.

Contact: Jeffrey Hester
Jeffrey.Hester@va.gov
205-558-4744
Veterans Affairs Research Communications

A New Electrochemical Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer

A New Electrochemical Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer
Caltech chemists were able to electrochemically measure the activity of the most abundant human methyltransferase, DNMT1, from crude tumor tissue or healthy tissue. They consistently observed more ...

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

A New Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer

A New Approach to Detecting Colorectal Cancer
Caltech researchers used a DNA-modified, two working-electrode array to measure methyltransferase activity from tissue samples.They consistently observed more activity in tumorous tissue samples than ...

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Re-Timer Glasses

Re-Timer Glasses
Grace Dean will conduct a pilot study to determine whether glasses that shine light into the wearer's eyes is effective in treating insomnia among lung cancer patient.

Contact: Marcene Robinson
marcener@buffalo.edu
716-645-4595
University at Buffalo

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (2 of 2)

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (2 of 2)
Salk Institute and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute created a compound that stops a cellular recycling process to target cancer.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
858-453-4100
Salk Institute

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (1 of 2)

New Drug Squashes Cancer's Last-Ditch Efforts to Survive (1 of 2)
Cell recycling (shown in green) is elevated in lung cancer cells treated with an established cancer drug. Recycling is suppressed upon co-treatment with a newly discovered enzyme inhibitor.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
858-453-4100
Salk Institute

Protein=Protein Interaction

Protein=Protein Interaction
Immune checkpoints induce their action through a complex network of protein-protein interactions. For example, the PD-1 pathway starts with a specific binding between the PD-1 receptor and either of ...

Contact: Sandra Pysklywyc
sandrapysk@ualberta.ca
780-492-0662
University of Alberta

The Telomere G-Tail Length in Healthy Individuals and Patients

The Telomere G-Tail Length in Healthy Individuals and Patients
The telomere G-tail shortening might cause endothelial dysfunction and age-related white matter change.

Contact: Norifumi Miyokawa
pr-research@office.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Hiroshima University

Microscopic Image of Fibroblast Cells

Microscopic Image of Fibroblast Cells
Microarray image overlaid with brightfield microscopy of fibroblasts probed using digital microfluidic immunocytochemistry in single cells.

Contact: RJ Taylor
rj.taylor@utoronto.ca
416-978-4498
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

Digital Microfluidics in Action

Digital Microfluidics in Action
GIF depicting passive dispensing of three successive 1.8-microliter droplets to a virtual microwell.

Contact: RJ Taylor
rj.taylor@utoronto.ca
416-978-4498
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

Targeting Telomeres, the Timekeepers of Cells, Could Improve Chemotherapy

Targeting Telomeres, the Timekeepers of Cells, Could Improve Chemotherapy
In an unexpected finding, the Salk Institute and collaborators show how disabling telomere protection during cell division prompts cell death.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Disabled Protection of Telomeres during Mitosis Causes Cell Death

Disabled Protection of Telomeres during Mitosis Causes Cell Death
Salk researchers show how the disabled protection of ends of chromosomes (blue) called telomeres (green) during cell division (mitosis) prompts cell death. This happens when the telomere-protecting ...

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Disabling Telomere Protection during Cell Division Prompts Cell Death

Disabling Telomere Protection during Cell Division Prompts Cell Death
During mitosis, a cell's chromosomes (blue) rapidly divide. When the ends of chromosomes called telomeres (green) are no longer protected by the protein TRF2, the cell receives a signal (red) to ...

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

DNA Nucleotides

DNA Nucleotides
Short inverted repeat sequences of DNA nucleotides are enriched at human cancer breakpoints.

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

The CNIO Launches a Video to Promote Citizen Participation in Cancer Research

The CNIO Launches a Video to Promote Citizen Participation in Cancer Research
Six months after the launch of the philanthropic campaign 'CNIO Friends: more research, less cancer', the Centre honors its donors in a video designed to promote individual philanthropy in cancer ...

Contact: Vanessa Pombo
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Surface Sampling Probe

Surface Sampling Probe
Oak Ridge National Laboratory's new droplet-based surface sampling probe speeds the process of analyzing a liver biopsy sample.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Biomedical Breakthrough Team

Biomedical Breakthrough Team
University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Prabuddha Mukherjee, left, bioengineering professors Rohit Bhargava and Dipanjan Pan, and postdoctoral researcher Santosh Misra, right, report the ...

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University
Helmholtz International Fellow Award for the immunologist and cancer researcher Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI), Israel together with Professor Thomas Sommer, ...

Contact: Barbara Bachtler
bachtler@mdc-berlin.de
49-309-406-3896
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association

DPP4 Inhibition Blocks Tumor Growth

DPP4 Inhibition Blocks Tumor Growth
Histological section of two mouse melanomas -- (a) untreated and (b) treated with sitagliptin, a specific DPP4 inhibitor. Stain: hematoxylin and eosin; scale bar: 500 mm.

Contact: Myriam Rebeyrotte
presse@pasteur.fr
Institut Pasteur

Graph

Graph
This graph shows the likelihood of diagnosing a lung cancer manifesting in a nonsolid nodule, sepa¬rately in the baseline (blue) and annual repeat (red) rounds of CT screening.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

CT Images

CT Images
These CT images in a 68-year-old smoker show (a) a nonsolid nodule (17 3 13 mm) in the left upper lobe at baseline screening, (b) the nodule remained nonsolid at follow-up 2 years later, and (c) a ...

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Medical Lasers

Medical Lasers
Medical laser technology innovations provide new, less-invasive light-based treatments.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Golgi Apparatus

Golgi Apparatus
Cells stained orange to illuminate the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, the parts of the cell where the enzyme FAM20C might phosphorylate other proteins.

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

LPA1 Receptor

LPA1 Receptor
The new research reveals the 3-D structure of a receptor for LPA1, a protein implicated in many diseases of the brain and in normal physiology throughout the body.

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Device Analyzes Metabolism of Pro-Drugs Within the Liver

Device Analyzes Metabolism of Pro-Drugs Within the Liver
A microfabricated device developed by the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine is able to analyze the effects of pro-drugs -- substances transformed within the liver into ...

Contact: Noah Brown
nbrown9@partners.org
617-643-3907
Massachusetts General Hospital

T Cell Cartoon

T Cell Cartoon
Regulatory T cells police the immune system, making sure that killer T cells coming back from battling pathogens transition into a resting state, but still prepared to fight if the pathogen returns. ...

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Chromatin DNA

Chromatin DNA
This is a 3-D model of chromatin.

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Paul Spagnuolo, University of Waterloo

Paul Spagnuolo, University of Waterloo
Professor Paul Spagnuolo from the University of Waterloo has discovered a lipid in avocados that combats acute myeloid leukemia by targeting the root of the disease -- leukemia stem cells. Worldwide, ...

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

Optical Coherence Tomography in Brain Surgery

Optical Coherence Tomography in Brain Surgery
An illustration of a new technique using optical coherence tomography that could help surgeons differentiate a human brain tumor, red, from surrounding noncancerous tissue, green

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Microbe Mobilizes 'Iron Shield' to Block Arsenic Uptake in Rice

Microbe Mobilizes 'Iron Shield' to Block Arsenic Uptake in Rice
Clumps of bacteria (soil microbe EA106) and iron plaque begin forming on the roots of a rice plant. This "iron shield" blunts the uptake of arsenic.

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Advancing Research on Arsenic Problem in Rice

Advancing Research on Arsenic Problem in Rice
Plant and soil scientists at the University of Delaware are studying the effectiveness of the soil microbe EA106 in decreasing the uptake of arsenic in rice plants. From right, assistant professor ...

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Morphing Atoms

Morphing Atoms
Chemists at Tufts University, collaborating with PerkinElmer and University College London, have witnessed atoms of one chemical element morph into another for the first time. In this simulation, the ...

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Gene Expression

Gene Expression
Epigenetic processes are essential during development and are misregulated in disease. Epigenetic regulation plays a critical role in specifying what type a cell will turn into during development, ...

Contact: Dr. Ralf Dahm
press@imb.de
49-613-139-21455
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Penetration Depths for Temporal Focusing

Penetration Depths for Temporal Focusing
Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology compare microscopy methods, in one of the papers in a special section.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Harnessing the Immune System to Fight Ovarian Cancer

Harnessing the Immune System to Fight Ovarian Cancer
This infographic illustrates how a new therapy can harness the immune system to fight ovarian cancer.

Contact: Jen Gundersen
jeg2034@med.cornell.edu
646-317-7401
Weill Cornell Medical College

Reversion of Colorectal Cancer Cells to Normal

Reversion of Colorectal Cancer Cells to Normal
Colorectal cancer cells can revert to functioning normal cells in vivo when Apc levels are restored, even if potent oncogenic insults such as Kras and p53 mutations are present.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Apc Restoration

Apc Restoration
These are immunofluorescent images of intestinal organoid cultures. Gene silencing of Apc in intestinal organoids triggered a cancer-like response (left). Reactivation of Apc expression restored ...

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Gynecologic Oncologists within 50 Miles, by US County

Gynecologic Oncologists within 50 Miles, by US County
This map shows: Gynecologic Oncologists within 50 Miles, by US County.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Breast Epithelial Cells

Breast Epithelial Cells
This is a detail of breast epithelial cells in culture undergoing ductal elongation and side-branching.

Contact: Dr. Christina Scheel
christina.scheel@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-2012
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Eleanor ncRNA

Eleanor ncRNA
Non-coding RNA "Eleanor" activates the gene (ESR1) that inhibits the treatment of breast cancer through hormone therapy.

Contact: Naoko Fukuda
research-coordinator@jimu.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
Kumamoto University

Circulating Tumor Cells

Circulating Tumor Cells
This image shows circulating tumor cells.

Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
323-442-2823
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Albert Kim, M.D., Ph.D., Washington University School of Medicine

Albert Kim, M.D., Ph.D., Washington University School of Medicine
Neurosurgeon Albert Kim, M.D., Ph.D., shown planning for surgery, leads a team that has identified a new vulnerability in brain tumor stem cells. Such cells are notorious for their ability to resist ...

Contact: Michael C. Purdy
purdym@wustl.edu
314-286-0122
Washington University School of Medicine

New Vulnerability Identified in Brain Tumor Stem Cells

New Vulnerability Identified in Brain Tumor Stem Cells
Brain tumor stem cells can resist treatment and regrow tumors, but scientists have identified a vulnerability in these cells that could lead to a new approach in battling deadly brain tumors.

Contact: Michael C. Purdy
purdym@wustl.edu
314-286-0122
Washington University School of Medicine

Principle of the Sensor

Principle of the Sensor
This image shows the principle of the sensor.

Contact: Stanislav Goryachev
stas.goryachev@gmail.com
7-964-501-2307
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Fluorescence Microscopy of Maternal and Paternal Chromosomes

Fluorescence Microscopy of Maternal and Paternal Chromosomes
Fluorescence microscopy of maternal and paternal chromosomes is shown at the first mitosis during the oocyte to embryo transition in the mouse. The ATRX protein (red) decorates the centromeres of ...

Contact: Charlene Betourney
cbetourney@uga.edu
706-542-4081
University of Georgia

ATRX and Chromosome Stability

ATRX and Chromosome Stability
ATRX is required to maintain chromosome stability. Genome-wide analysis by spectral karyotyping reveals that loss of ATRX function in mouse cells results in centromeric breaks and chromosome ...

Contact: Charlene Betourney
cbetourney@uga.edu
706-542-4081
University of Georgia

SNMMI Image of the Year

SNMMI Image of the Year
This is an illustration of theranostic PSMA-617 endoradiotherapy success in treating prostate cancer.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Fruit Fly Wings

Fruit Fly Wings
The same genes that make black spots on fruit fly wings can cause cancer in humans.

Contact: Thomas Werner
twerner@mtu.edu
906-487-1209
Michigan Technological University

Fruit Fly Genetics Lab

Fruit Fly Genetics Lab
Thomas Werner shows a bottle of fruit flies to a group of his students.

Contact: Thomas Werner
twerner@mtu.edu
906-487-1209
Michigan Technological University

A Valuable Marker for Prostate Cancer Metastasis

A Valuable Marker for Prostate Cancer Metastasis
In RApidCaP, a mouse model of human metastatic prostate cancer that they developed, Trotman and colleagues have identified an immune system marker that may help to distinguish patients who will and ...

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

A Valuable Marker for Prostate Cancer Metastasis

A Valuable Marker for Prostate Cancer Metastasis
In RapidCaP, a mouse model of human metastatic prostate cancer that they developed, Trotman and colleagues have identified an immune system marker that may help to distinguish patients who will and ...

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Desert Dweller

Desert Dweller
Patterns of abnormal growth in some flowers and plants result in rare features known as fasciations. Pictured here, a crested saguaro cactus, displaying fanlike irregularities thought to be the result...

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

First Human Therapy with Lu-177-labeled PSMA-617

First Human Therapy with Lu-177-labeled PSMA-617
This image shows the first human therapy with Lu-177-labeled PSMA-617.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

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