IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

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Japonica Array

Japonica Array
The array contains 659,253 SNPs, including tag SNPs for imputation, SNPs of Y chromosome and mitochondria, and SNPs related to previously reported genome-wide association studies and pharmacogenomics.

Contact: Fuji Nagami
f-nagami@med.tohoku.ac.jp
81-227-177-908
Tohoku University

Form and Function

Form and Function
Comparison of the BRCC36 homodimer (top) with the BRCC36-KIAA0157DC heterodimer (bottom) reveals similarities in MPN domain association but disorder of the helical bundle region.

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Epigenetics and Gain-of-Function p53 Mutations

Epigenetics and Gain-of-Function p53 Mutations
Gain-of-function p53 mutants are recruited by ETS family proteins to activate genes, including key epigenetic enzymes MLL1, MLL2 and MOZ. This, in turn, results in altered histone modifications genome...

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Cells Dividing

Cells Dividing
Cells dividing. Genetic material is shown in blue and mitochondria in red. During this process, the mitochondria are damaged (yellow signs) making the cells particularly dependent on glucose as a ...

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

University of Pennsylvania Personalized Cellular Therapy for Leukemia

University of Pennsylvania Personalized Cellular Therapy for Leukemia
This b-roll reel includes highlights of the steps involved in the University of Pennsylvania's clinical trials testing a personalized cellular therapy known as CTL019 for the treatment of leukemia.

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

<i>Cryptococcus</i> Germination

Cryptococcus Germination
This is a spore of the deadly human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus (green) germinates into a yeast (yellow). Germination takes about 16 hours. Afterwards, the new yeast begins to reproduce by ...

Contact: Christina Hull
cmhull@wisc.edu
University of Wisconsin-Madison

The Benefits of Gene Sequencing in Childhood Cancer

The Benefits of Gene Sequencing in Childhood Cancer
Dr. Rajen Mody, pediatric oncologist at U-M's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, explains the benefits of DNA sequencing for kids with rare and aggressive cancer.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Chinnaiyan Lab

Chinnaiyan Lab
Xuhong Cao, Arul Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D., and Dan Robinson, Ph.D., from the Michigan Center for Translational Pathology.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

DNA Damage

DNA Damage
DNA damage (red) in cells submitted to replicative stress, similar to those observed during cell reprogramming.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Inducing Metabolic Catastrophe in Cancer

Inducing Metabolic Catastrophe in Cancer
Eliminating HK2 (shown here), which is a key enzyme for glucose metabolism, may be a way to prevent cancer cells from surviving, according to a new study in JCB.

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Comparison

Comparison
Lean vs. obese tissue is shown.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Advanced Materials

Advanced Materials
A confocal micrograph showing HCT 116 cancer cells containing drug delivery nanoparticles.

Contact: Lindsay Brooke
lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk
44-115-951-5751
University of Nottingham

Fetal Influence

Fetal Influence
Dramatic research has shown that during pregnancy, cells of the fetus often migrate through the placenta, taking up residence in many areas of the mother's body, where their influence may benefit or ...

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-258-8972
Arizona State University

Fetal Microchimerism and Maternal Health

Fetal Microchimerism and Maternal Health
This is a story about the mysteries of life. Where myth meets reality. Where science meets science fiction. Where two bodies collide and fact is stranger than fiction. We all know where babies ...

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-258-8972
Arizona State University

Comparison of Stained and Unstained Images in Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Comparison of Stained and Unstained Images in Breast Cancer Diagnosis
Figure 3 from a new article in the Journal of Biomedical Optics compares stained bright-field microscopy (top row) and SLIM (bottom row) images in their respective abilities to show malignant ...

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Brazilian Wasp

Brazilian Wasp
This is the Brazilain social wasp Polybia paulista.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Salk Institute Shows How DNA Repair Proteins Distinguish DNA Breaks at Cellular and And Viral Genome

Salk Institute Shows How DNA Repair Proteins Distinguish DNA Breaks at Cellular and And Viral Genome
DNA breaks and DNA viruses are ancient and persistent threats to cellular viability. A universal difference between cellular genomes is that they are far larger and have far more proteins called ...

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

The DNA Damage Response Goes Viral: A Way in for New Cancer Treatments

The DNA Damage Response Goes Viral: A Way in for New Cancer Treatments
Salk researchers show how DNA repair proteins sound the alarm to threats, pointing to a novel cancer therapy.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Chin-Yo Lin and Sridevi Addanki, University of Houston

Chin-Yo Lin and Sridevi Addanki, University of Houston
Professor Chin-Yo Lin works with Ph.D. student Sridevi Addanki in his lab at the Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of...

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Cancer Cells Embedded in Cryogel

Cancer Cells Embedded in Cryogel
Cancerous melanoma cells shown with their cell bodies (green) and nuclei (blue) are nestled in tiny hollow lumens within the polymeric cryogel (red) structure.

Contact: Kat McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Injectable Cryogel-Based Whole-Cell Cancer Vaccines SEM

Injectable Cryogel-Based Whole-Cell Cancer Vaccines SEM
This scanning electron microscopy image shows the thawed cryogel with its well-organized interconnected porous architecture ready to be infused with cancer cells and immune factors.

Contact: Kat McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

3-D Model of a Tumor

3-D Model of a Tumor
This is a three-dimensional model of a tumor showing cell types in varying colors.

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

A New Lens on Colorectal Cancer

A New Lens on Colorectal Cancer
New research shows the impact prostaglandin PGE2 has on the spread of CSCs to the liver. 'In cancer, the cells keep making PGE2 chronically, so it's like this wounding process that never heals. In ...

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-258-8972
Arizona State University

Compound Found in Red Wine Causes Conflicting Changes in Dogs' Immune Systems

Compound Found in Red Wine Causes Conflicting Changes in Dogs' Immune Systems
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that resveratrol does affect the immune systems of dogs in different ways when introduced to dogs' blood.

Contact: Nathan Hurst
hurstn@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia

Brd4 Distribution in Mouse Brain

Brd4 Distribution in Mouse Brain
A striking brain presence: Neurons throughout the mouse brain produce Brd4, a protein targeted by some new cancer drugs. In this cross-section of a mouse brain, Brd4-producing cells are stained red ...

Contact: Eva Kiesler
ekiesler@rockefeller.edu
212-327-7963
Rockefeller University

Protein Interaction

Protein Interaction
Nuclear magnetic resonance-derived images depict the structures of proteins Tom1 (green) and Tollip (red). These interactive regions are required for both proteins to achieve their cooperative ...

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Tumor-Suppressing Protein PTEN at Cellular Membrane

Tumor-Suppressing Protein PTEN at Cellular Membrane
An activated PTEN dimer that contains two non-mutant proteins (A) can transform the functional lipid (D) on the cellular membrane (E) into a chemical form that tunes down cancer predilection. Dimers ...

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

<em>Aplidium albicans</em>

Aplidium albicans
The ascidian Aplidium albicans was found in the Balearic Islands. The anticancer drug APLIDIN was originally found in this marine macroorganism and is now synthetically synthesized.

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Effects of Chemoradiation on Healthy Brain Tissue of Glioblastoma Patients

Effects of Chemoradiation on Healthy Brain Tissue of Glioblastoma Patients
MR images taken before (left) and 28 weeks after (right) the initiation of chemoradiation treatment for glioblastoma show an enlargement of the brain's ventricles, reflecting a loss of brain tissue.

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Charles Fuchs on Caffeinated Coffee

Charles Fuchs on Caffeinated Coffee
Regular consumption of caffeinated coffee may help prevent the return of colon cancer after treatment and improve the chances of a cure, according to a new, large study led by Charles Fuchs, M.D., M.P...

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Casanova

Casanova
In a developing Drosophila embryo, (above) E-Cadherin keep cells together to facilitate coordinated migration; (below) without E-Cad cells are disorganized.

Contact: Sònia Armengou
armengou@irbbarcelona.org
34-934-037-255
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

Photodynamic Cancer Therapy
A new approach to cancer therapy using improved photodynamic technology has been developed at Oregon State University.

Contact: Oleh Taratula
oleh.taratula@oregonstate.edu
503-346-4704
Oregon State University

Off Target Effects

Off Target Effects
When a mouse's immune system reacts to red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite (dark spots within some of the pink cells above), changes occur in the DNA of B lymphocytes. These alterations...

Contact: Wynne Parry
wparry@rockefeller.edu
212-327-7789
Rockefeller University

Ray and the Sunbeatables™

Ray and the Sunbeatables™
Ray and the Sunbeatables™ are shown.

Contact: Scott Merville
smerville@mdanderson.org
713-792-0661
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Multi-colored Metastasis

Multi-colored Metastasis
This is a multi-colored metastasis in the peritoneal lining of the abdomen comprised of red and yellow fluorescent cells demonstrating that pancreatic cancer spreads through interactions between ...

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

With New Contrast Agent, MRI Detects Micrometastases in Mice

With New Contrast Agent, MRI Detects Micrometastases in Mice
For earlier detection of metastases, Case Western Reserve University researchers developed a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent that includes a probe that binds to fibrin-fibronectin complexes ...

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Fashioning Cancer: Glioma

Fashioning Cancer: Glioma
Normal brain area on the left (blue and green) is encountering invading cancer cells (glioma; red). Credit: Wun Chey Sin/Christian Naus. Cells in Community dress: Bronwyn Malloy, UBC Alumna & now ...

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy Linked with Liver Cancer

Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy Linked with Liver Cancer
In a new study researchers at the University of Gothenburg found that the risk of hepatobiliary cancer and immune-mediated and cardiovascular diseases later in life is higher in women with ...

Contact: Hanns-Ulrich Marschall
hanns-ulrich.marschall@gu.se
University of Gothenburg

MRI Detects Early Breast Cancer Metastases in Mice

MRI Detects Early Breast Cancer Metastases in Mice
Metastasis occurs when cells are shed from primary breast cancer tumor and establish a new tumor at a distant site. For early detection of the metastasis with MRI, the Lu Lab at Case Western ...

Contact: Raymond A MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Liposomes Are Used in the Stimuvax Experimental Cancer Vaccine

Liposomes Are Used in the Stimuvax Experimental Cancer Vaccine
Liposomes are used in the Stimuvax experimental cancer vaccine.

Contact: Stanislav Goryachev
stas.goryachev@gmail.com
7-964-501-2307
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Immunotherapy Technology

Immunotherapy Technology
Researchers used Timelapse Imaging Microscopy In Nanowell Grids (TIMING) to demonstrate that CD4+ CD19-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR+) T cells participate in multi-killing of tumor cells with slower ...

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

PROSPECT (2 of 3)

PROSPECT (2 of 3)
The research study, Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety through Patient-centeredness, Engagement, Communication, and Technology (PROSPECT), provided patients and their caregiver's iPads on which they...

Contact: Johanna Younghans
Jyounghans@partners.org
617-525-6373
Brigham and Women's Hospital

PROSPECT (3 of 3)

PROSPECT (3 of 3)
The research study, Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety through Patient-centeredness, Engagement, Communication, and Technology (PROSPECT), provided patients and their caregiver's iPads on which they...

Contact: Johanna Younghans
Jyounghans@partners.org
617-525-6373
Brigham and Women's Hospital

PROSPECT (1 of 3)

PROSPECT (1 of 3)
The research study, Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety through Patient-centeredness, Engagement, Communication, and Technology (PROSPECT), provided patients and their caregiver's iPads on which they...

Contact: Johanna Younghans
Jyounghans@partners.org
617-525-6373
Brigham and Women's Hospital

miR-7 Suppresses Stomach Cancer

miR-7 Suppresses Stomach Cancer
Zhao et al. identify a regulatory circuit in human gastric cells that becomes compromised by H. pylori-induced inflammation and leads to the development of stomach cancer.

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Oral Squamous Cell

Oral Squamous Cell
This is an image of an oral squamous cell invading the extracellular matrix of a healthy cell.

Contact: Erin Vollick
erin.vollick@dentistry.utoronto.ca
416-979-4900 x4381
University of Toronto - Faculty of Dentistry

Flow (2 of 2)

Flow (2 of 2)
Rice University graduate student Marco Santoro fills a custom bioreactor with fluid as he prepares to test bone cancer cells embedded in a scaffold. The technique allows researchers to monitor the ...

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Flow (1 of 2)

Flow (1 of 2)
Bone cancer cells populate the surface of a bioscaffold in an electron microscope image. Rice University scientists ran tests to show how realistic environments affect the growth of cancer tumors. ...

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Tumoroids

Tumoroids
Tumorids: Villin-Lin28b/Let7-knockout enteroids in 3-D culture are shown.

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

TEM View

TEM View
This is an image of the newly repackaged pharmaceutical under a transmission electron microscope. The dark spots are the water-insoluble cores of the nanoparticles, while the peptide chains are barely...

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Control vs. MCB-613

Control vs. MCB-613
Cancer cells were treated with a control (left) and the overstimulating compound MCB-613 (right).

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

An Integrated Microfluidic Chip Design

An Integrated Microfluidic Chip Design
An integrated microfluidic chip design with an embedded 3-D hydrogel scaffold provides a transfer-rable microenvironment for the recovery and longitudinal study of captured circulating tumor cells.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Dr. Chunhong Yan, Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Dr. Chunhong Yan, Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University
Dr. Chunhong Yan is a molecular biologist at the Georgia Regent University Cancer Center and the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Medical College of Georgia at GRU.

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Pre-Targeting

Pre-Targeting
Tracking the tumor: PNA-antibodies detect initially the diseased cells (red) and accumulate at the tumor site. Afterwards the radioactively labeled probes (blue) selectively bind to them by specific ...

Contact: Simon Schmitt
s.schmitt@hzdr.de
49-351-260-3400
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Cells

Cells
Cells whose fluorescent labeling reveals dot shaped or filamentous mitochondria (green), nuclei (blue) or the cytoplasm (greenish-black).

Contact: Jean-Claude Martinou
jean-claude.martinou@unige.ch
41-223-796-443
Université de Genève

E2-Crimson Expressing Tumor Cells

E2-Crimson Expressing Tumor Cells
This image shows an E2-Crimson expressing tumor cells (gray/white structures) in the organs of a rat after six weeks of tumor development.

Contact: Katrin Albaum
katrin.albaum@bioss.uni-freiburg.de
49-761-203-97662
BIOSS - Centre for Biological Signalling Studies

Ink Wash Painting Captured in Mouse's Leg

Ink Wash Painting Captured in Mouse's Leg
The Department of Creative IT Engineering (CiTE) at POSTECH, Korea, has presented a winning image of blood vessels in a mouse's leg taken by Seungwan Jeon, a doctoral student of CiTE. Titled "Ink Wash...

Contact: YunMee Jung
ymjung@postech.ac.kr
82-054-279-2417
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

Cherry Blossom Blooms in Mouse's Ear

Cherry Blossom Blooms in Mouse's Ear
The Department of Creative IT Engineering (CiTE) at POSTECH, Korea, has presented a winning image of blood vessels in a mouse's ear taken by Jaewoo Kim, a doctoral student of CiTE. Titled "Cherry ...

Contact: YunMee Jung
ymjung@postech.ac.kr
82-054-279-2417
Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

First Reports of Robotic Surgery for Advanced Vena Cava Tumor Thrombus Due to Kidney Cancer

First Reports of Robotic Surgery for Advanced Vena Cava Tumor Thrombus Due to Kidney Cancer
This image shows inferior vena cava control for which individualized surgical planning is necessary. Note various locations of Rummel tourniquet placement for achieving proximal control of IVC as ...

Contact: Linda Gruner
jumedia@elsevier.com
212-633-3923
Elsevier Health Sciences

Real-Time Imaging of Lung Lesions During Surgery Helps Localize Tumors and Improve Precision

Real-Time Imaging of Lung Lesions During Surgery Helps Localize Tumors and Improve Precision
Intraoperative imaging detects a lung adenocarcinoma during a pulmonary resection.

Contact: Nicole Baritot
press@aats.org
978-299-4520
American Association for Thoracic Surgery

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