IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

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Microtubules

Microtubules
Rice University scientists are using custom software to help explain the dynamic instability seen at all times in microtubules, essential elements of a cell's cytoskeleton. The individual elements are...

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

PHD Controls the Epidermal Growth Factor Reptor

PHD Controls the Epidermal Growth Factor Reptor
A special PHD protein, PHD3, also controls the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In healthy cells, PHD3 responds to stressors such as a lack of oxygen by stimulating the uptake of EGF receptors...

Contact: Amparo Acker-Palmer
Acker-Palmer@bio.uni-frankfurt.de
49-069-798-42563
Goethe University Frankfurt

Targeted Cancer Treatment with Nuclear Medicine Therapy

Targeted Cancer Treatment with Nuclear Medicine Therapy

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) has released a new infographic showing how certain types of cancer can be treated using nuclear medicine therapy. Targeted Cancer ...

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Balch Paper Image

Balch Paper Image
This schematic shows the transition from a healthy protein folding state (green) to an unhealthy, maladaptive state (red) -- a maladaptive stress response -- that occurs in response to chronic ...

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Lung Cancer Treatment

Lung Cancer Treatment
A mutation of the KRAS gene leads to a common and hard-to-treat lung cancer. A new combination therapy (lipophilic bisphosphonate and rapamycin) administered to mice for 40 days resulted in shrunken ...

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Powerful One-Two Punch Targets Lung Cancer

Powerful One-Two Punch Targets Lung Cancer
A mutation of the KRAS gene leads to a common and hard-to-treat lung cancer. Salk researchers find a powerful combination therapy that targets this cancer.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

New Technology Spots Better Drug Targets

New Technology Spots Better Drug Targets
Researchers at the Salk Institute explain how a new technology, called ReBiL, can spot protein interactions more accurately, providing a new tool for cancer and other drug diagnostics.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Yao-Cheng Li and Geoffrey Wahl, Salk Institute

Yao-Cheng Li and Geoffrey Wahl, Salk Institute
Salk researcher Yao-Cheng Li and professor Geoffrey Wahl developed a new technology for visualizing protein interactions, which could lead to better cancer drugs.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Willow Cutting in Lab

Willow Cutting in Lab
UW researchers Sharon Doty and Zareen discuss the next experimental design using willow.

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Willow Treated with Microbe from Eastern Cottonwood

Willow Treated with Microbe from Eastern Cottonwood
Willow cuttings treated with a microbe that naturally occurs in an eastern cottonwood are able to withstand the toxic effects of growing in a solution with the industrial pollutant phenanthrene. ...

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

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