IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

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Going to 'Wars' against Cancer and Heart Disease

Going to 'Wars' against Cancer and Heart Disease
This is a microscopic view to show blood vessel formation or angiogenesis at high resolution. Left: Normal blood vessel formation throughout the body during development of a zebrafish embryo. Right: ...

Contact: Yen May Ong
yenmay.ong@duke-nus.edu.sg
65-660-12057
Duke-NUS Medical School

Mitochondria Stress and Cancer

Mitochondria Stress and Cancer
Mitochondrial stress induces expression of nearly 120 genes involved in cell metabolism, morphology, resistance to apoptosis and cell invasion in addition upregulation of p53 by reduced expression of ...

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Cancer Pathway Activated from 'Below'

Cancer Pathway Activated from 'Below'
FER activates a receptor called MET from below, i.e., in the absence of a growth factor like HGF docking at the receptor surface. MET is often overexpressed in aggressive ovarian cancers. Drs. Fan and...

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Supressing FER Reduces Metastasis

Supressing FER Reduces Metastasis
Experiments in mice showed that FER helps to promote metastasis in ovarian cancer. Three mice with similar primary ovarian tumors are shown prior to surgery (top row) and following surgery (middle and...

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

A New Pathway in Ovarian Cancer

A New Pathway in Ovarian Cancer
A previously undiscovered pathway through which ovarian cells can be transformed into cancer cells. The key is a protein called FER, which can be found floating in the cell cytoplasm. CSHL scientists ...

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Subtle Changes in Benign Tissues

Subtle Changes in Benign Tissues
In benign tissue next to a prostate tumor, the orientation of prostate glands, tends to be more uniform in those at low risk for biomedical recurrence but disordered among those at high risk.

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Swappable Binding Sites Reveal a Drug's Target

Swappable Binding Sites Reveal a Drug's Target

(top) This image shows Boehringer Ingelheim generated molecules that inhibit the BRD9 bromodomain. The middle molecule, BI-7273, was selected as the best of the three and was used in experiments ...

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Where a New Drug Binds to Prevent Leukemia from Proliferating

Where a New Drug Binds to Prevent Leukemia from Proliferating
View at atomic resolution shows how candidate drug BI-7273 fits precisely in BRD9's deep bromodomain binding pocket. In preclinical tests, the drug's binding prevented AML cells from proliferating.

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Computer Detection Vs Expert Detection of Early Esophageal Cancer

Computer Detection Vs Expert Detection of Early Esophageal Cancer
Six contours were drawn by five experts and the computer systems, of early esophageal cancer. The image top right is the contour drawn by the computer system.

Contact: Fons van der Sommen
f.v.d.sommen@tue.nl
31-652-457-838
Eindhoven University of Technology

Pharmacogenomic Interactions in Cancer

Pharmacogenomic Interactions in Cancer
A discovery that cancer cell lines can be used to predict how a tumor is likely to respond to a drug has implications for developing new, personalized treatments.

Contact: Mary Todd Bergman
mary@ebi.ac.uk
44-788-137-7941
European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute

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