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Public Release: 18-Apr-2015
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015
Study reveals a cause of poorer outcomes for African-American patients with breast cancer
Poorer outcomes for African-American women with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer, compared with European-American patients, appears to be due, in part, to a strong survival mechanism within the cancer cells, according to a study.
Nina Hyde Center for Breast Cancer Research

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
ELCC 2015 European Lung Cancer Conference
Evidence grows that melanoma drugs benefit some lung cancer patients
A subset of lung cancer patients can derive important clinical benefits from drugs that are more commonly used to treat melanoma, the authors of a new academic clinical trial in Europe have reported at the European Lung Cancer Conference in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
ELCC 2015 European Lung Cancer Conference
Smokers underestimate risks of a few cigarettes
Many people still dangerously underestimate the health risks associated with smoking even a few cigarettes a day, despite decades of public health campaigning, French researchers have reported at the European Lung Cancer Conference in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
ELCC 2015 European Lung Cancer Conference
DNA blood test detects lung cancer mutations
Cancer DNA circulating in the bloodstream of lung cancer patients can provide doctors with vital mutation information that can help optimize treatment when tumor tissue is not available, an international group of researchers has reported at the European Lung Cancer Conference in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Cancer and chemobrain: Cancer diagnosis affects cognitive function
Breast cancer patients often display mild cognitive defects even before the initiation of chemotherapy. A new study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers now attributes the syndrome to post-traumatic stress induced by diagnosis of the disease.

Contact: Luise Dirscherl
presse@lmu.de
0049-892-180-3423
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
ELCC 2015 European Lung Cancer Conference
One in 4 advanced lung cancer patients started on firstline treatment before EGFR test results available
Almost one in four patients (24 percent) with advanced lung cancer in Europe, Asia and the US are not receiving EGFR test results before being started on treatment, researchers report at the European Lung Cancer Conference.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
JAMA Oncology
Obesity significantly increases prostate cancer risk in African-American men, study finds
Obesity in black men substantially increases the risk of low- and high-grade prostate cancer, while obesity in white men moderately reduces the risk of low-grade cancer and only slightly increases the risk of high-grade cancer, according to the first large, prospective study to examine how race and obesity jointly affect prostate cancer risk.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kristen Woodward
kwoodwar@fredhutch.org
206-667-5095
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
After prostate cancer, start walking
Walking at an easy pace for about three hours every week may be just enough physical activity to help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects of their treatment, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of California San Francisco Research Evaluation and Allocation Committee Award

Contact: Erin Spain
spain@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
JAMA Oncology
Obesity associated with prostate cancer risk in African-American men
Obesity was associated with an increased risk for prostate cancer in African-American men and that risk grew by nearly four times as body mass index increased, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Kristen Woodward
kwoodwar@fredhutch.org
206-667-5095
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Science
Scientists discover protein that boosts immunity to viruses and cancer
Scientists have discovered a protein that plays a central role in promoting immunity to viruses and cancer, opening the door to new therapies.
Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, British Heart Foundation

Contact: Sam Wong
sam.wong@imperial.ac.uk
44-207-594-2198
Imperial College London

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Cell Reports
Study reveals possible new avenues for breast cancer therapy
An exhaustive analysis has been conducted of more than 12,000 distinct proteins present in an often aggressive and difficult to treat form of breast cancer, called triple-negative breast cancer. The results may help explain why these cancers often fail to respond to current drug treatments and may provide researchers with new targets for drug therapy. The types of proteins found in various subtypes of this aggressive cancer may suggest why they behave differently and respond to treatment differently.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Science Foundation, South Sound CARE Foundation, Washington Research Foundation, Gary E. Milgard Family Foundation

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Science
Cell type responsible for scarring, skin-cancer growth identified by Stanford scientists
A skin cell responsible for scarring, and a molecule that inhibits the cell's activity, have been identified by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Smith Family Trust, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Oak Foundation, Ingrid Lai and Bill Shu, Gunn/Olivier Fund, Human Frontier Science Program, and others

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
New assay helps determine lymphoma subtypes simply, quickly, and inexpensively
To differentiate the two major subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which differ in management and outcomes, researchers describe use of the reverse transcriptase-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (RT-MLPA) assay. RT-MLPA is as accurate as the current gold standard technology and offers advantages such as simplicity, flexibility, short turnaround time, low cost, and efficiency.
French National Cancer Institute, Ligue contre le Cancer (comite Seine Maritime), Agir avec Becquerel Association, GEFLUC Association, The CALYM Consortium

Contact: Eileen Leahy
jmdmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Smokers who use e-cigarettes less likely to quit
The increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation tool. In a new study, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that smokers who used e-cigarettes were 49 percent less likely to decrease cigarette use and 59 percent less likely to quit smoking compared to smokers who never used e-cigarettes.
California Department of Public Health

Contact: Yadira Galindo
ygalindo@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
JAMA Oncology
More analysis from the women's health initiative on hormones, breast cancer
Analysis of the longer-term influence of menopausal hormone therapy on breast cancer incidence in two Women's Health Initiative clinical trials suggests a pattern of changing influences over time on breast cancer, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Laura Mecoy
Lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Journal of Hepatology
The CNIO links telomeres to the origins of liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis
Researchers generated a mouse with dysfunctional telomeres in the liver; as a result, it developed cellular alterations present in human diseases such as hepatitis or cirrhosis. This study is the first to show that alterations in the functioning of telomeres lead to changes in the liver that are common to diseases associated with an increased risk of liver cancer. This finding provides the basis for understanding the molecular origin of these diseases, as well as identifying new therapeutic strategies for their prevention and control.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Neuro-Oncology
Research finds no correlation between regulatory T cells and survival in glioblastoma
Using a novel methodology of epigenetic quantitative analysis, Dartmouth investigators found no correlation between regulatory T cells (Tregs) and survival in the tumor microenvironment or blood, even when adjusting for well-known prognostic factors.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kirk Cassels
kirk.A.Cassels@Hitchcock.org
603-653-6177
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
PLOS Medicine
New genomics tool could help predict tumor aggressiveness, treatment outcomes
A new method for measuring genetic variability within a tumor might one day help doctors identify patients with aggressive cancers that are more likely to resist therapy, according to a study led by researchers now at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and others

Contact: Amanda Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Cardiorespiratory fitness reduces disease risk among smokers
Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health.

Contact: Hannah Rhodes
Hannah.C.Rasorrhodes@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3030
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Zinc deficiency linked to activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway
Zinc deficiency -- long associated with numerous diseases, e.g., autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers -- can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Contact: Mary Martialay
martim12@rpi.edu
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Survey shows half of older adults in US now taking aspirin
A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. The findings suggest that tens of millions of Americans have reviewed the issues involved, often discussed it with their doctors, say they know what they are doing -- and decided to use aspirin.
Partnership for Prevention, Council on Aspirin for Health and Prevention

Contact: Craig Williams
craig.williams@oregonstate.edu
503-494-1598
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
EMBO Molecular Medicine
A new mouse model for the study of neurofibromatosis
The research group of the neurofibromatosis of the Catalan Institute of Oncology, the Institute of Biomedical Research of Bellvitge and the Institute of Medicicina Predictive and Personalized Cancer has developed new mouse models for the study of principal malignant tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
34-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Keep moving, studies advise cancer survivors
Three or more hours of walking per week can boost the vitality and health of prostate cancer survivors. Men and women who have survived colorectal cancer and are regular walkers as well report lower sensations of burning, numbness, tingling or loss of reflexes that many often experience post-treatment. These are among the findings of two studies published in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship that highlight the benefits of exercise for cancer survivors.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics
Red Journal's May issue focuses on the vital role of RT in modern lymphoma treatment
The 'Radiation and the Modern Management of Lymphoma' issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics, the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, is focused on the integral role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Cell Reports
Angiogenesis inhibitors undermined by immune cells, says study
Angiogenesis inhibitors -- a widely used class of cancer drugs designed to shrink tumors by preventing them from forming new blood vessels -- often work in the short term, but usually become ineffective within months. Now, a team led by UC San Francisco scientists has discovered a possible reason, one that could lead to a way to address the problem and prevent cancer relapse.
National Institutes of Health, AARC Carcinoid Foundation

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1291.

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