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Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening
A team of researchers led by Shaoxin Li at Guangdong Medical College in China has demonstrated the potential of a new, non-invasive method to screen for prostate cancer, a common type of cancer in men worldwide. They describe their laboratory success testing an existing spectroscopy technique called surface-enhanced Raman scattering with a new, sophisticated analysis technique called support vector machine.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Enzyme controlling metastasis of breast cancer identified
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified an enzyme that controls the spread of breast cancer. The findings, reported in the current issue of PNAS, offer hope for the leading cause of breast cancer mortality worldwide. An estimated 40,000 women in America will die of breast cancer in 2014, according to the American Cancer Society.
Susan G. Komen for the Cure, National Institutes of Health, Pedal the Cause San Diego

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
JAMA
Breast cancer patients with bilateral mastectomy don't have better survival rates
Breast cancer patients treated with lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy survived as long as patients who had bilateral mastectomy, according to a large study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Cancer Prevention Institute of California.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
JAMA
Increase seen in use of double mastectomy
Among women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in California, the percentage undergoing a double mastectomy increased substantially between 1998 and 2011, although this procedure was not associated with a lower risk of death than breast-conserving surgery plus radiation, according to a study in the Sept. 3 issue of JAMA. The authors did find that surgery for the removal of one breast was associated with a higher risk of death than the other options examined in the study.

Contact: Jana Cuiper
Jana.Cuiper@cpic.org
510-608-5160
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
‘Prepped’ by tumor cells, lymphatic cells encourage breast cancer cells to spread
Breast cancer cells can lay the groundwork for their own spread throughout the body by coaxing cells within lymphatic vessels to send out tumor-welcoming signals, according to a new report by Johns Hopkins scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Safeway Foundation for Breast Cancer

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Scientific Reports
Sabotage as therapy: Aiming lupus antibodies at vulnerable cancer cells
Yale Cancer Center researchers may have discovered a new way of harnessing lupus antibodies to sabotage cancer cells made vulnerable by deficient DNA repair. The study, led by James E. Hansen, M.D., assistant professor of therapeutic radiology at Yale School of Medicine, found that cancer cells with deficient DNA repair mechanisms (or the inability to repair their own genetic damage) were significantly more vulnerable to attack by lupus antibodies.
American Cancer Society Institutional Research Grant

Contact: Vicky Agnew
203-785-7001
Yale University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Scientists call for investigation of mysterious cloud-like collections in cells
About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do -- even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment. Now, researchers are issuing a call to investigators to focus their attention on the role of these formations.
Burroughs Wellcome Clinical Scientist Award in Translational Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Chemistry
A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs
EPFL scientists have developed a new amino acid that can be used to modify the 3-D structure of therapeutic peptides. Insertion of the amino acid into bioactive peptides enhanced their binding affinity up to 40-fold. Peptides with the new amino acid could potentially become a new class of therapeutics.
National Centre of Competence in Research Chemical Biology, Swiss National Science Foundation, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
British Journal of General Practice
Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer
Scientists at the University of Exeter Medical School found that one in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine -- identified by their GP testing their urine -- transpired to have bladder cancer. The figure was around half those who had visible blood in their urine -- the best known indicator of bladder cancer. However, it was still higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant further investigation.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Cell Reports
Preventing cancer from forming 'tentacles' stops dangerous spread
A new study from the research group of Dr. John Lewis at the University of Alberta and the Lawson Health Research Institute has confirmed that 'invadopodia' play a key role in the spread of cancer. The study, published in Cell Reports, shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely.
Canadian Cancer Society, Alberta Cancer Foundation, Prostate Cancer Canada, Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Ross Neitz
rneitz@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
CU scientists' discovery could lead to new cancer treatment
A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. These findings could have implications that extend beyond cancer, including treatments for inborn immunodeficiency and metabolic conditions and autoimmune diseases.

Contact: Kris Kitto
kris@morethanpr.com
303-320-7790
The Bawmann Group

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Assortativity signatures of transcription factor networks contribute to robustness
The assortativity signature of transcription factor networks is an indication of robustness.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Clinical Oncology
Research demonstrates potential method to better control lung cancer using radiotherapy
Researchers at the University of Manchester and the Christie NHS Foundation Trust -- both part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre -- have looked at ways to personalize and increase the dose to the tumor while minimizing the effect on healthy tissue.

Contact: Alison Barbuti
alison.barbuti@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Molecular Cell
Research shows how premalignant cells can sense oncogenesis and halt growth
What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. CSHL experiments now show how cells can respond to an activated RAS gene by entering a quiescent state called senescence.
National Institutes of Health, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer Center Support Grant, Fonds de Recherche de l'Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal; Heart and Stroke Foundation-Québec

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells
Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters -- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream -- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center.
Janssen Diagnostics, Stand Up to Cancer, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, National Foundation for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, ESSCO Breast Cancer Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Dental Hygiene
UTHealth researchers find up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Dentistry.
Advanced Response Corporation

Contact: Edgar Veliz
Edgar.R.Veliz@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3307
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Gastroenterology
Drug shows promise for subset of stage III colon cancer patients
A subset of patients with stage III colon cancer had improved survival rates when treated with irinotecan-based therapy, according to a new study in Gastroenterology.

Contact: Aimee Frank
media@gastro.org
301-941-2620
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Some women still don't underststand 'overdiagnosis' risk in breast screening
A third of women who are given information about the chance of 'overdiagnosis' through the NHS breast screening programme may not fully understand the risks involved.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Flora Malein
flora.malein@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98300
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
JAMA Dermatology
Photodynamic therapy vs. cryotherapy for actinic keratoses
Photodynamic therapy (PDT, which uses topical agents and light to kill tissue) appears to better clear actinic keratoses (AKs, a common skin lesion caused by sun damage) at three months after treatment than cryotherapy (which uses liquid nitrogen to freeze lesions).

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Genome Biology
Better classification to improve treatments for breast cancer
Breast cancer can be classified into ten different subtypes, and scientists have developed a tool to identify which is which. The research, published in the journal Genome Biology, could improve treatments and targeting of treatments for the disease.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
ACS Nano
The thunder god vine, assisted by nanotechnology, could shake up future cancer treatment
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. The collaboration between the Institute of Basic Science/Seoul National University and National Cancer Center Singapore represents an auspicious therapeutic approach about HCC.
Institute for Basic Science, SingHealth Foundation, National Medical Research Council, Biomedical Research Council of Singapore, Millennium Foundation

Contact: Han Bin Oh
ohanvin@ibs.re.kr
82-428-788-182
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Blood
Drug represents first potential treatment for common anemia
An experimental drug designed to help regulate the blood's iron supply shows promise as a viable first treatment for anemia of inflammation, according to results from the first human study of the treatment published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
202-552-4914
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Human Genetics
Dartmouth isolates environmental influences in genome-wide association studies
Model allows researcher to remove false positive findings that plague modern research when many dozens of factors and their interactions are suggested to play a role in causing complex diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Promising new cancer therapy uses molecular 'Trash Man' to exploit a common cancer defense
While many scientists are trying to prevent the onset of a cancer defense mechanism known as autophagy, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are leveraging it in a new therapy that causes the process to culminate in cell death rather than survival.
National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Fighting prostate cancer with a tomato-rich diet
Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 percent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests.
National Institute for Health Research

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1250.

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