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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1239.

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Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Useful markers to predict response to chemotherapy in patients with liver cancer
A study led by the researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research, Isabel Fabregat, could serve to select patients with hepatocellular carcinoma unresponsive to most frequently used drug in liver cancer: sorafenib. The study, published in the International Journal of Cancer describes how tumor cells that have a less differentiated phenotype (mesenchymal) and expresses CD44, do not respond to sorafenib action.

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
34-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Precise and programmable biological circuits
A team led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson has developed several new components for biological circuits. These components are key building blocks for constructing precisely functioning and programmable bio-computers.

Contact: Yaakov Benenson
kobi.benenson@bsse.ethz.ch
41-613-873-338
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
UNC scientists discover hidden subpopulation of melanoma cells
UNC researchers discover a subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors. These cells, which mimic non-cancerous endothelial cells that normally populate blood vessels, could provide researchers with another target for cancer therapies.
National Institutes of Health, University Cancer Research Fund at UNC-Chapel Hill

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
JAMA Surgery
Study examines readmission after colorectal cancer surgery as quality measure
No significant variation was found in hospital readmission rates after colorectal cancer surgery when the data was adjusted to account for patient characteristics, coexisting illnesses and operation types, which may prompt questions about the use of readmission rates as a measure of hospital quality.

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Highly effective new anti-cancer drug shows few side effects in mice
A new drug, known as OTS964, can eradicate aggressive human lung cancers transplanted into mice. It inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types but is rarely expressed in healthy adult tissues. Without this protein, cancer cells fail to complete the cell-division process and die.
New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan, OncoTherapy Science Inc.

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Cancer
Quality of biopsy directly linked to survival in bladder cancer patients
UCLA researchers have shown for the first time that the quality of diagnostic staging using biopsy in patients with bladder cancer is directly linked with survival.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, STOP Cancer Foundation

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
ecancermedicalscience
When heart cancer hides in the brain
The 59-year-old woman had complained of chest pain and shortness of breath. A biopsy revealed that she had an unusual type of 'heart cancer' called cardiac lymphoma. But a week after receiving treatment, the patient developed a headache and her motor skills began to deteriorate. Fortunately, doctors at the institute had seen a similar strange case just two years before.

Contact: Audrey Nailor
audrey@ecancer.org
44-117-942-0852
ecancermedicalscience

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Thermal paper cash register receipts account for high bisphenol A (BPA) levels in humans
Research conducted at the University of Missouri is providing the first data that BPA from thermal paper used in cash register receipts accounts for high levels of BPA in humans. Subjects studied showed a rapid increase of BPA in their blood after using a skin care product and then touching a store receipt with BPA.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Current Oncology Reports
Cancer patients should not hesitate to speak with their doctors about dietary supplements
Many cancer patients use dietary supplements such as vitamins, minerals and herbs or other botanicals but often don't tell their doctor. This gap in communication can happen when patients believe that their doctors are indifferent or negative toward their use of these supplements. As a result, patients may find information about dietary supplements from unreliable sources, exposing themselves to unneeded risks. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers describe a practical patient-centered approach to managing dietary supplement use in cancer care in a review article.

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Silencing the speech gene FOXP2 causes breast cancer cells to metastasize
A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has identified an unexpected link between a transcription factor known to regulate speech and language development and metastatic colonization of breast cancer.

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
UTMB researchers uncover powerful new class of weapons in the war on cancer
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch, and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have identified small molecules that can represent a new class of anticancer drugs with a novel target for the treatment of lung cancer. These findings are detailed in Nature Communications. A PCT patent was jointly documented by these two Institutes for the invention.
National Institutes of Health, Emory University, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Prostate
Finally: A missing link between vitamin D and prostate cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Prostate offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Fast modeling of cancer mutations
A new genome-editing technique enables rapid analysis of genes mutated in tumors.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Proteome Research
New analysis methodology may revolutionize breast cancer therapy
Stroma cells are derived from connective tissue and may critically influence tumor growth. This knowledge is not new. However, bioanalyst Christopher Gerner and an interdisciplinary team from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have developed a novel methodology for investigation. Using modern mass spectrometry, tumor-promoting activities from breast fibroblasts were directly determined from needle biopsy samples. Recently this experimental break-through is published in the renowned Journal of Proteome Research.

Contact: Christopher Gerner
christopher.gerner@univie.ac.at
43-142-775-2302
University of Vienna

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
Loss of Y chromosome associated with higher mortality and cancer in men
Age-related loss of the Y chromosome from blood cells, a frequent occurrence among elderly men, is associated with elevated risk of various cancers and earlier death, according to research presented at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
press@ashg.org
301-634-7346
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
Triplet threat from the sun
The most obvious effects of too much sun exposure are cosmetic, like wrinkled and rough skin. Some damage, however, goes deeper -- ultraviolet light can damage DNA and cause proteins in the body to break down into smaller, sometimes harmful pieces that may also damage DNA, increasing the risk of skin cancer and cataracts. Understanding the specific pathways by which this degradation occurs is an important step in developing protective mechanisms against it.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Detecting cancer earlier is goal of rutgers-developed medical imaging technology
A new medical imaging method being developed at Rutgers University could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology and shortwave infrared light to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Blood biomarker may detect lung cancer, study presented at CHEST 2014
A new study shows that patients with stage I to stage III non-small cell lung cancer have different metabolite profiles in their blood than those of patients who are at risk but do not have lung cancer.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
2014 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium
Early palliative care can cut hospital readmissions for cancer patients
Doctors at Duke University Hospital have developed a new collaborative model in cancer care that reduced the rates at which patients were sent to intensive care or readmitted to the hospital after discharge. The Duke researchers shared their findings today at the Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Diabetes
Resetting the circadian clock: Shift workers might want to skip high-iron foods
A study sheds light on higher incidence of metabolic diseases among those who work off-hours.

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Earlier unknown molecular-level mechanism may increase the growth of breast cancer cells
Researchers at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the University of Turku and the University of Oslo have discovered a previously unknown molecular-level mechanism that may partly explain the increased growth of cancer cells.

Contact: Dr. Marko Kallio
marko.kallio@vtt.fi
358-207-222-810
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature
New study demonstrates advances in creating treatment for common childhood blood cancer
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center conclude new drug in development may offer first alternative to standard chemotherapy for T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Trastuzumab continues to show life for HER2-positve early stage breast cancer
After following breast cancer patients for an average of eight-plus years, researchers say that adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy significantly improved the overall and disease-free survival of women with early stage HER2-positive breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Genentech

Contact: Paul Scotti
scotti.paul@mayo.edu
904-953-0199
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Patients who have left breast tumors have comparable OS to those with right breast tumors
Tumor laterality (left-side vs. right-side) does not impact overall survival in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy, according to a study published in the Oct. 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1239.

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