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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1201.

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Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
BJU International
Smoking may increase risks for patients being treated for prostate cancer
Among patients with prostate cancer, those who smoke have increased risks of experiencing side effects from treatment and of developing future cancer recurrences, or even dying from prostate cancer.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Journal of Neurosurgery
Decisions on future childbearing in women diagnosed with a meningioma
Female meningioma survivors were surveyed to ascertain their personal attitudes toward childbearing and what influences may have played a role in their attitudes. The survey revealed that 43 of respondents 25-44 years of age were warned that pregnancy was a risk factor for meningioma recurrence. Nevertheless, these women were more likely to want a baby (70 percent vs. 54 percent) and intend to have a baby (27 percent vs. 12 percent) than same-age women in the general population.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Moffit Cancer Center

Contact: Jo Ann M. Eliason
jaeliason@thejns.org
434-982-1209
Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Analysis rejects linkage between testosterone therapy and cardiovascular risk
Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall.

Contact: Jerry Berger
jberger@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7308
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cooperation between cancer cells makes therapies ineffective, suggests new treatment
New research from the University of East Anglia shows why many cancers are difficult to treat and come back following treatment. Scientists have shown that cancer cells cooperate with each other in the production of growth factors (molecules produced by the cancer cells that are essential for tumor progression). It is hoped that the findings will lead to a new type of treatment involving genetically modified cancer cells being reinserted into a tumor.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Mayo Clinic: New breast cancer risk prediction model more accurate than current model
A new breast cancer risk prediction model combining histologic features of biopsied breast tissue from women with benign breast disease and individual patient demographic information more accurately classified breast cancer risk than the current screening standard. Results of a Mayo Clinic study comparing the new model to the current standard, the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool, are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Care eliminates racial disparity in colon cancer survival rates, Stanford study finds
A study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine shows that more equitable delivery of evidence-based care can close a persistent racial disparity in colon cancer survival rates in the United States.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Cell Biology
Cells take sole responsibility for Merkel cell maintenance
Researchers have identified a population of 'progenitor' cells in the skin that are solely responsible for the generation and maintenance of touch-sensing Merkel cells.
National Institutes of Health, Richard King Mellon Foundation Institute for Pediatric Research

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Nature Chemical Biology
New strategy to combat 'undruggable' cancer molecule
Three of the four most fatal cancers are caused by a protein known as Ras; either because it mutates or simply because it ends up in the wrong place at the wrong time. Ras has proven an elusive target for scientist trying to cure the deadly diseases. Now a group from the Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen have discovered an unknown way for RAS to find its proper place in the cell. Their discovery may lead to completely novel approaches to curing cancer.

Contact: Jes Andersen
jean@science.ku.dk
0045-30-50-65-82
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Developmental Cell
CNIO scientists discover a new blood platelet formation mechanism
The new cellular mechanism, called the endocycle, encourages the formation of platelets, the cells needed to coagulate blood. In mouse models, endocycles can help to control thrombocytopenia, a disease caused by a deficit in platelet production that causes heavy haemorrhaging. The new process could act as an alternative source of platelets when the normal mechanisms fail.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study reveals how a cancer-causing virus blocks human immune response
Scientists have revealed how a type of cancer-causing virus outwits the human body's immune response. The discovery might help explain why some cancer therapies that incorporate interferon fail to treat certain cancers and might lead to more effective treatments.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Cancer
Many women with breast cancer have poor knowledge about their condition
A new analysis has found that many women with breast cancer lack knowledge about their illness, with minority patients less likely than white patients to know and report accurate information about their tumors' characteristics.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Study finds potential new drug target for lung cancer
A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a key enzyme and its associated metabolic programming may lead to novel drug development to treat lung cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/Common Fund

Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Annals of Oncology
Death rates from lung cancer will overtake those for breast cancer in 2015 among EU women
Death rates from lung cancer will exceed those for breast cancer for the first time among European women in 2015, according to the latest predictions published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology.
Swiss League against Cancer, Swiss Foundation for Research against Cancer, Italian Association for Cancer Research

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
American Journal of Roentgenology
Is head CT overused in emergency departments?
Most patients presenting to the emergency department with syncope or dizziness may not benefit from head CT unless they are older, have a focal neurologic deficit, or have a history of recent head trauma.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Clinical Cancer Research
Phase 1 clinical trial of CUDC-101 'throws kitchen sink' at head and neck cancer
At 18 months median follow up, one patient's cancer had worsened, two had died, and nine remained free of disease. Testing of blood and tumor samples showed that CUDC-101 had indeed inhibited the action of EGFR, HDAC and Her2.
Curis, Inc.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How cancer turns good cells to the dark side
Rice University biophysicists reveal how cancer uses notch-signaling pathways to promote metastasis. Their computer models provide a fresh theoretical framework for scientists who study ways to target cancer progression.
National Science Foundation, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, The Keck Center for Interdisciplinary Bioscience Training of the Gulf Coast Consortia, The Sao Paulo Research Foundation, The Welch Foundation, The Tauber Family Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
New model better predicts breast cancer risk in African American women
Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center have developed a breast cancer risk prediction model for African American women that found greater accuracy in predicting risk for the disease. The use of this model could result in increased eligibility of African Americans in breast cancer prevention trials.
The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Cancer Research
An engineering approach from Virginia Tech helps breast cancer researchers at Georgetown
Biologists working with engineers and physicists have found a molecule they say helps determine if breast cancer cells that are resistant to antiestrogen therapy will live or die. Their study, published online earlier this month in Cancer Research, represents a major finding from a unique collaboration between Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and Virginia Tech that was designed to study the living cell as an information processing system.
National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen Grant

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
215-514-9751
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Jan-2015
British Journal of General Practice
Patients dismissing 'trivial' symptoms could delay cancer diagnosis
People who dismiss their symptoms as trivial or worry about wasting the doctor's time may decide against going to their GP with red-flag cancer warning symptoms, according to a Cancer Research UK study published in the British Journal of General Practice today.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Sally Staples
sally.staples@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98313
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 25-Jan-2015
ACS Nano
Promising use of nanodiamonds in delivering cancer drug to kill cancer stem cells
A study led by the National University of Singapore found that attaching chemotherapy drug Epirubicin to nanodiamonds effectively eliminates chemo-resistant cancer stem cells.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Journal of Proteomics and Bioinformatics
Researchers identify efficient methylating enzyme for cancer development
A recent study may help begin to explain how cancer develops though the abnormal turning on and off of genes. Researchers have discovered that the increase of methyl tags in cancer cells is due to highly efficient DNA methyl transferase 1 (DNMT1) enzymes found in these cells. The findings appear in the Journal of Proteomics and Bioinformatics.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing 2016
Noisy data facilitates Dartmouth investigation of breast cancer gene expression
Dartmouth researchers reported in Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing on the use of denoising autoencoders to effectively extract key biological principles from gene expression data and summarize them into constructed features with convenient properties.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: kirk Cassels
kirk.A.Cassels@Hitchcock.org
603-653-6177
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
International Journal of Epidemiology
Head and neck cancers in young adults are more likely to be a result of inherited factors
An article published online today in the International Journal of Epidemiology pools data from 25 case-control studies and conducts separate analyses to show that head and neck cancers in young adults are more likely to be as a result of inherited factors, rather than lifestyle factors such as smoking or drinking alcohol.

Contact: Katie Stileman
katherine.stileman@oup.com
44-018-653-53344
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Science
Pictured together for the first time: A chemokine and its receptor
Researchers at University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Bridge Institute at the University of Southern California report the first crystal structure of the cellular receptor CXCR4 bound to an immune signaling protein called a chemokine. The structure, published Jan. 22 in Science, answers longstanding questions about a molecular interaction that plays an important role in human development, immune responses, cancer metastasis and HIV infections.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America Foundation

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Cell Reports
Angel or devil? For cancer, not all neutrophils are created equal
New research from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem shows that neutrophils, the most common form of white blood cells, contain many different subtypes. While some fight the development of cancer, others promote its progression. This distinction between harmful and helpful neutrophils opens up new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. Further research into the effects of boosting anti-tumor neutrophils and limiting tumor-promoting neutrophils may take us closer to developing effective new therapies for cancer.
Israeli Centers for Research Excellence Gene Regulation in Complex Human Disease, Abisch-Frenkel Foundation, Rosetrees Trust, Israel Cancer Research Foundation RCDA grant, CONCERN foundation, chief Scientist of the Israel Ministry of Health

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1201.

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