IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1276.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Tumor location in colorectal cancer may influence survival
The two halves of the human colon have different embryonic origins and gene expression patterns, and these differences may also play a role in cancer biology, according to a study published Feb. 24 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Genetics
Discovery of the genetic fingerprint of aggressive colon tumors
Scientists are currently developing a test that enables the identification of patients at risk of relapse after surgical removal of a tumor by measuring four to six genes expressed by the tumor microenvironment.

Contact: Sònia Armengou
armengou@irbbarcelona.org
34-934-037-255
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium
Sunitinib, sorafenib of no benefit in ECOG-ACRIN renal cell trial
Research results highlighted today at the press conference of a major medical meeting report no benefit from the use of either Sutent (sunitinib) or Nexavar (sorafenib) among patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma at high risk of recurrence, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group announced. Both of these oral drugs are widely used in helping patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, commonly called kidney cancer, live longer with their disease.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Diane M. Dragaud
ddragaud@ecog-acrin.org
215-789-3631
ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Physicians performing breast exams may miss masses deep in breast
Many physicians who tested their breast-examination skills on a new type of pressure-sensing breast model failed to detect masses deep in the breast because they were not pressing hard enough, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Small molecule might help reduce cancer in at-risk population, Stanford study finds
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that by changing the selectivity of an enzyme, a small molecule could potentially be used to decrease the likelihood of alcohol-related cancers in an at-risk population.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rosanne Spector
manishma@stanford.edu
650-725-5374
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Environmental Health Perspectives
Baby formula poses higher arsenic risk to newborns than breast milk, Dartmouth study shows
In the first US study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers found that formula-fed infants had higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants, and that breast milk itself contained very low arsenic concentrations.

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Customized DNA rings aid early cancer detection in mice, Stanford study finds
Stanford University School of Medicine investigators administered a customized genetic construct consisting of tiny rings of DNA, called DNA minicircles, to mice. The scientists then showed that mice with tumors produced a substance that tumor-free mice didn't make. The substance was easily detected 48 hours later by a simple blood test.
Canary Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation, Sir Peter Michael Foundation

Contact: Bruce Goldman
goldmanb@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
MD Anderson studies skin cancer patients resistant to leading therapy
Powerful drugs known as BRAF-inhibitors have been crucial for melanoma patients, saving lives through their ability to turn off the BRAF protein's power to spur cancer cell growth.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Cancer
Certain factors influence whether cancer patients involve family members in treatment decisions
Family members often play an important role in providing care for patients with cancer, but which patients are more or less likely to involve family members in decisions regarding their care is not well known.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium
Androgen receptor abnormality may not be associated
Findings from a small prospective study suggest that androgen receptor V7 (or AR-V7) status does not significantly affect response to taxane chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Treatment outcomes were largely similar for the 17 patients with AR-V7-positive prostate cancer and the 20 patients with AR-V7-negative disease included in this analysis. The study will be presented at the upcoming 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando.

Contact: Wendy Stokes
wendy.stokes@asco.org
571-483-1356
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Disparities in breast cancer care linked to net worth
Household net worth is a major and overlooked factor in adherence to hormonal therapy among breast cancer patients and partially explains racial disparities in quality of care.
American Cancer Society, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium
Early evidence of increase in higher-risk prostate cancers from 2011-2013
An analysis of data on roughly 87,500 men treated for prostate cancer since 2005 finds a notable increase in higher-risk cases of the disease between 2011 and 2013. The study will be presented at the upcoming 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando.

Contact: Wendy Stokes
wendy.stokes@asco.org
571-483-1356
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium
Men who have had testicular cancer are more likely to develop prostate cancer
A case-control study of close to 180,000 men suggests that the incidence of prostate cancer is higher among men with a history of testicular cancer (12.6 percent) than among those without a history of testicular cancer (2.8 percent). Men who have had testicular cancer were also more likely to develop intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancers. The study will be presented at the upcoming 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando.

Contact: Wendy Stokes
wendy.stokes@asco.org
571-483-1356
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Pediatrics
Tests reveal under-reported exposure to tobacco smoke among preemies with lung disease
Public health experts have long known that tobacco smoke exposure can be harmful for children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a lung disease that often accompanies premature birth.
Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium
Adjuvant sorafenib and sunitinib do not improve outcomes in locally advanced kidney cancer
Findings from a federally funded study suggest that patients with locally advanced kidney cancer should not be treated with either adjuvant (post-surgery) sorafenib or sunitinib. The average period to disease recurrence was similar between those who received sorafenib or sunitinib after surgery (5.6 years) and those treated with placebo (5.7 years). The study will be presented at the upcoming 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando.

Contact: Wendy Stokes
wendy.stokes@asco.org
571-483-1354
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium
Active surveillance of intermediate-risk prostate cancer associated with decreased survival
An analysis of data on 945 patients with prostate cancer that is managed with active surveillance shows differences in outcomes depending on whether the patient was low or intermediate risk at diagnosis. The study will be presented at the upcoming 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando.

Contact: Wendy Stokes
wendy.stokes@asco.org
571-483-1356
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
New HPV approved after international phase 2/3 trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center
A pivotal international phase 2/3 clinical trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center faculty demonstrated that vaccination with Gardasil 9 protects against nine HPV types, seven of which cause most cases of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal disease. The trial data indicate that if populations are vaccinated with Gardasil 9 approximately 90 percent of all cervical cancers worldwide can be prevented.
Merck & Co., Inc.

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kim.Polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Mayo researchers identify gene that pushes normal pancreas cells to change shape
A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and the University of Oslo, Norway, have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer -- one of the most difficult tumors to treat.
American Association for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Mayo Clinic SPORE for Pancreatic Cancer

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Clinical Cancer Research
Palbociclib shows promise in patients with hormone-resistant breast cancer
Palbociclib, an investigational oral medication that works by blocking molecules responsible for cancer cell growth, is well tolerated and extends progression-free survival in newly diagnosed, advanced breast cancer patients, including those whose disease has stopped responding to traditional endocrine treatments.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
The Breast
Women back idea of more breast screens for those at high risk of cancer
Most women (85 percent) would back the idea of more frequent breast screening if they are at higher genetic risk of developing breast cancer, according to research published today by The Breast.
Cancer Research UK, The Eve Appeal

Contact: Liz Smith
liz.smith@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98300
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Cell Reports
Breast cancer spread may be tied to cells that regulate blood flow
Tumors require blood to emerge and spread. That is why scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center believe that targeting blood vessel cells known as pericytes may offer a potential new therapeutic approach when combined with vascular growth factors responsible for cell death.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
UW research shows sensor technology may help improve accuracy of clinical breast exams
Sensor technology has the potential to significantly improve the teaching of proper technique for clinical breast exams, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gian Galassi
ggalassi@uwhealth.org
608-263-5561
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
New nanogel for drug delivery
MIT chemical engineers have designed a new type of self-healing hydrogel that could be injected through a syringe.
Wellcome Trust, isrock Foundation, Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah McDonnnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
PLOS ONE
New target for prostate cancer treatment discovered by Keck Medicine of USC researchers
Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California scientists have found a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The findings offer evidence that a newly discovered member of a family of cell surface proteins called G-protein coupled receptors promotes prostate cancer cell growth.
National Institutes of Health, Robert E. and May R. Wright Foundation

Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
323-442-2823
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Science
Evolution may hold the key to more designer cancer drugs like Gleevec
Dorothee Kern, a professor of biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, unraveled the journey of two closely related cancer-causing proteins -- one susceptible to the drug Gleevec and one not -- over one billion years of evolution. She and her team pinpointed the exact evolutionary shifts that caused Gleevec to bind well with one and poorly with the other. This new approach may have a major impact on the development of rational drugs to fight cancer.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Catalysis Science Program, US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@brandeis.edu
781-736-4027
Brandeis University

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1276.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

EurekAlert!