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Showing releases 101-125 out of 1265.

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Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cancer
Older breast cancer patients still get radiation despite limited benefit
Women over the age of 70 who have certain early-stage breast cancers overwhelmingly receive radiation therapy despite published evidence that the treatment has limited benefit, researchers at Duke Medicine report.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cancer
Most elderly women with early stage breast cancer receive a treatment that may not be as effective
A new analysis has found that while clinical trial data support omitting radiation treatments in elderly women with early stage breast cancer, nearly two-thirds of these women continue to receive it.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
News from Annals of Internal Medicine Dec. 8, 2014
This week's issue includes: 'Breast density notification laws substantially increase costs yet save few lives' and 'Institute of Medicine 'Dying in America' report sparks discussion and debate.'

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
American Society of Hematology 56th Annual Meeting
UH Case Medical Center experts present data at ASH Annual Meeting
In a poster, Jane Little, MD, from Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, and colleagues present promising findings related to a novel biochip aimed at improving outcomes for patients with sickle cell disease. The innovative biochip, which evaluates the biophysical properties of red blood cells in sickle cell patients, has the potential to become a standard test for monitoring the disease.
Doris Duke Foundation, Belcher-Weir Innovation grant from UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital

Contact: Alicia Reale
Alicia.Reale@UHhospitals.org
216-533-0685
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists pinpoint a new line of defence used by cancer cells
Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered a new line of defense used by cancer cells to evade cell death, according to research published in Nature Communications.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Stephanie McClellan
stephanie.mcclellan@cancer.org.uk
44-203-469-5314
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Blood
Experimental gene therapy successful in certain lymphomas and leukemia
Study results of CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor therapy using the Sleeping Beauty non-viral transduction system to modify T cells has demonstrated further promise in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Immunotherapy shows clinical benefit in relapsed transplant recipients
A multicenter phase 1 trial of the immune checkpoint blocker ipilimumab found clinical benefit in nearly half of blood cancer patients who had relapsed following allogeneic stem cell transplantation, according to investigators from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, who developed and lead the study.
The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program of the National Cancer Institute, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Blood Cancer Research Partnership

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cancer Cell
New agent causes small cell lung tumors to shrink in pre-clinical testing
Small cell lung cancer -- a disease for which no new drugs have been approved for many years -- has shown itself vulnerable to an agent that disables part of tumor cells' basic survival machinery, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reported.
The National Institutes of Health, The Thoracic Foundation, The Susan Spooner Foundation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Bridge grant, the Danish Cancer Society.

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Heat-shock protein enables tumor evolution and drug resistance in breast cancer
Long known for its ability to help organisms successfully adapt to environmentally stressful conditions, the highly conserved molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 also enables estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy.
National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Susan G. Komen Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Disorder in gene-control system is a defining characteristic of cancer, study finds
The genetic tumult within cancerous tumors is more than matched by the disorder in one of the mechanisms for switching cells' genes on and off, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard report in a new study. Their findings, published online today in the journal Cancer Cell, indicate that the disarray in the on-off mechanism -- known as methylation -- is one of the defining characteristics of cancer and helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Blavatnik Family Foundation, Stand Up to Cancer, Melton and Rosenbach Funds, American Cancer Society, National Science Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature
Genetic errors linked to aging underlie leukemia that develops after cancer treatment
New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis challenges the view that cancer treatment in itself is a direct cause of a fatal form of leukemia that can develop several years after a patient receives chemotherapy or radiation therapy.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Young adults with ALL benefit from therapies developed for children
A large, prospective clinical trial adds to mounting evidence that adolescent and young adult patients -- aged 16 to 39 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia -- fare better when treated with high-intensity pediatric protocols than previous patients treated on adult regimens.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Blood
Combination therapy shown as effective for higher-risk MDS/AML patients
A phase two study that investigated the potential of the drugs azacitidine (AZA) and lenalidomide (LEN), demonstrated that the two therapies in combination may be an effective frontline treatment regimen for patients with higher-risk forms of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Penn researchers announce latest results of investigational cellular therapy
The latest results of clinical trials of more than 125 patients testing a personalized cellular therapy known as CTL019 will be presented by University of Pennsylvania researchers at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. Highlights of the new trial results will include a response rate of more than 90 percent among pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, and results from the first lymphoma trials testing the approach.
National Institutes of Health, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's Specialized Centers of Research, Stand Up To Cancer-St. Baldrick's Pediatric Dream Team Trans

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
New study identifies first gene associated with familial glioma
An international consortium of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine has identified for the first time a gene associated with familial glioma -- brain tumors that appear in two or more members of the same family -- providing new support that certain people may be genetically predisposed to the disease.

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-7973
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Study shows improved survival in aggressive acute myeloid leukemia
Patients who relapse in their battle with acute myeloid leukemia may benefit from a phase three study of therapies that combine an existing agent, cytarabine, with a newer compound, vosaroxin.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Narrow subset of cells is responsible for metastasis in multiple myeloma, study finds
Although it is among the most highly metastatic of all cancers, multiple myeloma is driven to spread by only a subset of the myeloma cells within a patient's body, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have found in a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Specialized Center of Research

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Study shows new kind of targeted drug has promise for leukemia patients
A new type of cancer therapy that targets an oncometabolite produced dramatic results in patients with advanced leukemia in an early-phase clinical trial.

Contact: Andrea Baird
bairda@mskcc.org
908-307-9255
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
American Society of Hematology 56th Annual Meeting
Oral inhibitor shows clinical activity in poor-prognosis AML
An oral targeted drug has shown encouraging activity and tolerable side effects in patients with treatment-resistant or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia -- a poor-prognosis group with few options -- report investigators from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.
AbbVie, Inc.

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5665
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
Studies compare blood clot treatments, illuminate recurrence risk in high-risk groups
Studies presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition compare new and standard-of-care treatments for blood clots and further illuminate clot risks in vulnerable populations, such as cancer patients.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
415-978-3620
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 7-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Novel combinations yield promising results for leukemia patients with poor prognoses
Recognizing that leukemia cannot be conquered with a 'one-size-fits-all' approach, researchers are pursuing novel targeted therapies and combinations of existing treatment regimens with new agents for patient populations with historically poor prognoses, according to data presented today during the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
415-978-3620
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Unprecedented benefit seen in test of three-drug treatment for multiple myeloma
In the treatment of multiple myeloma, the addition of carfilzomib to a currently accepted two-drug combination produced significantly better results than using the two drugs alone, according to a worldwide research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic.
Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Contact: Joe Dangor
dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu
651-261-9089
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Circulating RNA may provide prognostic tool for multiple myeloma
The 'molecular mail' sent by multiple myeloma cells provides clues to how well patients with the disease are likely to respond to treatment, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5665
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Novel strategies direct immune system to attack recurrent, hard-to-treat blood cancers
Novel treatments that harness the body's own immune cells to attack cancer cells demonstrate safe and durable responses in patients with relapsed and treatment-resistant blood cancers, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
415-978-3620
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Advances in lymphoma and multiple myeloma treatment seek to improve outcomes for patients
New treatment combinations and targeted therapies for lymphoma and multiple myeloma are improving outcomes for vulnerable patient populations with hard-to-treat disease, according to studies presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
415-978-3620
American Society of Hematology

Showing releases 101-125 out of 1265.

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