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Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1233.

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Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Discovery of a mechanism that makes tumor cells sugar addicted
For almost a hundred years ago is known that cancer cells feel a special appetite for a type of sugar called glucose. The tumor uses this molecule is like the gasoline which depends a sports car to burn faster and grows and multiplies rapidly. It is a little cash process from the energy point of view but allows a superaccelerated cancer cell division. It is what is known as the Warburg effect, which was described in 1927.

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
34-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Study shows fertility drugs do not increase breast cancer risk
Women who took clomiphene citrate (brand name Clomid) or gonadotropins as a part of fertility treatment did not experience an increased risk for breast cancer over 30 years of follow-up, compared with women who were not treated with these medications, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Cancer and the Goldilocks effect
Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found that too little or too much of an enzyme called SRPK1 promotes cancer by disrupting a regulatory event critical for many fundamental cellular processes, including proliferation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Fighting cancer with lasers and nanoballoons that pop
Researchers are developing a better delivery method for cancer drugs by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons -- which are tiny modified liposomes that, upon being struck by a red laser, pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
Nanoparticles cause cancer cells to self-destruct
Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumour cells to 'self-destruct' sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in Sweden.

Contact: Erik Renström
erik.renstrom@med.lu.se
46-403-91157
Lund University

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Nature
New general concept for the treatment of cancer
A team of researchers from five Swedish universities, led by Karolinska Institutet and the Science for Life Laboratory, have identified a new way of treating cancer. The concept is presented in the journal Nature and is based on inhibiting a specific enzyme called MTH1, which cancer cells, unlike normal cells, require for survival. Without this enzyme, oxidized nucleotides are incorporated into DNA, resulting in lethal DNA double-strand breaks in cancer cells.
Torsten Söderberg and Ragnar Söderberg Foundations, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation

Contact: Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-852-486-077
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Adenoma detection rates linked to colorectal cancer and mortality
A study of over 224,000 patients and more than 314,000 colonoscopies found that adenoma detection rates closely tracked the future risk of colorectal cancer. The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Cyrus Hedayati
chedayati@golinharris.com
415-318-4377
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Ethics guidelines for next generation of risky NASA missions
An Institute of Medicine committee will issue a report Wednesday April 2, 2014, on ethical principles and decision-making guidelines for protecting the health of astronauts on risky long duration and exploration spaceflights.
NASA

Contact: Leah Ramsay
lramsay@jhu.edu
202-642-9640
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Physics in Medicine and Biology
An easier, safer, and more accurate treatment for pancreatic cancer
Dartmouth scientists develop 3-D imaging for PDT treatment of pancreatic cancer to help make it a safer, more effective treatment.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Cancer
Team identifies novel biomarker for head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer
A biomarker is linked to better outcomes in patients with head and neck cancers and non-small cell lung cancer.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Head and Neck Society

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
215-862-2689
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
To boldly go? Experts issue ethics guidelines for NASA's next generation of risky missions
An Institute of Medicine committee has issued a report with ethics principles and guidelines to aid NASA in decision-making for longer, higher risk human spaceflights.
NASA

Contact: Leah Ramsay
lramsay@jhu.edu
202-642-9640
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Annals of Oncology
Pathological complete response predictor of favorable breast cancer outcome
Results of EORTC trial 10994 appearing in the Annals of Oncology show that pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an independent predictive factor of favorable clinical outcomes in all molecular subtypes of breast cancer.
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, European Union, Pharmacia, Sanofi-Aventus, Fondation Widmer, Cancer Research UK, La Ligue Contre le Cancer

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
JAMA
Medication does not help prevent ED following radiation therapy for prostate cancer
Among men undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, daily use of the erectile dysfunction drug tadalafil, compared with placebo, did not prevent loss of erectile function, according to a study in the April 2 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Joe Dangor
dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu
507-266-0696
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
JAMA
The mammography dilemma
A comprehensive review of 50 years' worth of international studies assessing the benefits and harms of mammography screening suggests that the benefits of the screening are often overestimated, while harms are underestimated.

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
PLOS Medicine
Screening for liver cancer in patients with cirrhosis
In a systematic review and meta-analysis of 47 studies with 15,158 patients, Amit Singal, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and colleagues found that patients with cirrhosis who underwent surveillance, via liver ultrasound with or without measurement of serum alpha fetoprotein, for hepatocellular carcinoma had cancers detected at an earlier stage, were more likely to receive curative instead of palliative treatment, and had longer survival.
UT-STAR

Contact: Fiona Godwin
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Likely culprit in spread of colon cancer identified
New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville has implicated a poorly understood protein called PLAC8 in the spread of colon cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Radiology
Digital mammography reduces recall and biopsy rates
Population-based screening with full-field digital mammography is associated with lower recall and biopsy rates than screen film mammography, suggesting that full-field digital mammography may reduce the number of diagnostic workups and biopsies that do not lead to diagnosis of breast cancer, according to a new study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 1, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, April 1, 2014, in the JCI: NOS1 expression predicts melanoma-dependent immune dysfunction, Murine model of glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma, Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators, Platelet-derived S100 family member myeloid-related protein-14 regulates thrombosis, Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2 mediates dimethyl fumarate's protective effect in EAE, and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Cell Metabolism
Obesity primes the colon for cancer, according to NIH study
Obesity, rather than diet, causes changes in the colon that may lead to colorectal cancer, according to a study in mice by the National Institutes of Health. The finding bolsters the recommendation that calorie control and frequent exercise are not only key to a healthy lifestyle, but a strategy to lower the risk for colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Arnette
arnetter@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-5143
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Higher risk of death from skin cancer among men living alone
There are differences in prognosis in cutaneous malignant melanoma depending on cohabitation status and gender, according to a new study published in the scientific periodical Journal of Clinical Oncology. Single men of all ages are more likely to die of their disease.
Swedish Cancer Society, Stockholm County Council, and others

Contact: Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-852-486-077
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
FASEB Journal
The human 'hairless' gene identified: One form of baldness explained
It's not a hair-brained idea: A new research report appearing in the April 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal explains why people with a rare balding condition called 'atrichia with papular lesions' lose their hair, and it identifies a strategy for reversing this hair loss.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
JAMA
Experts question routine mammograms in elderly
Doctors should focus on life expectancy when deciding whether to order mammograms for their oldest female patients, since the harms of screening likely outweigh the benefits unless women are expected to live at least another decade, according to a review of the scientific literature by experts at UCSF and Harvard medical schools.

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
BJU International
Certain genetic variants may identify patients at higher risk of bladder cancer recurrence
A new study by Dartmouth researchers suggests that certain inherited DNA sequences may affect a bladder cancer patient's prognosis. These findings may help physicians identify sub-groups of high risk bladder cancer patients who should receive more frequent screenings and aggressive treatment and monitoring.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Dutcher
robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Fast food giants' ads for healthier kids meals don't send the right message
Fast food giants attempts at depicting healthier kids' meals frequently goes unnoticed by children ages three to seven years old according to a new study by Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center. In research published in JAMA Pediatrics, Dartmouth researchers found that one-half to one-third of children did not identify milk when shown McDonald's and Burger King children's advertising images depicting that product. Sliced apples in Burger King's ads were identified as apples by only 10 percent of young viewers.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Healthy Eating Research Program

Contact: Donna Dubuc
donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
New tool helps young adults with sickle cell disease in the transition to adult care
Child and adolescent hematologists at Boston Medical Center have developed a tool to gauge how ready young adults with sickle cell disease are for a transition into adult care.

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1233.

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