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Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1290.

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Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
ERS International Congress 2015
Lancet Respiratory Medicine
First UK Biobank genetic study reveals new links between lung disease and smoking behavior
Smokers who survive their habit into old age may hold the key to better lung health for all, according to a Medical Research Council-funded study involving researchers at the University of Nottingham and the University of Leicester.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Emma Rayner
emma.rayner@nottingham.ac.uk
44-115-951-5793
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
Cancer
Coverage of celebrity's mastectomy has improved awareness of reconstructive breast surgery options
A new study found improved public awareness about reconstructive breast surgery options following Angelina Jolie's decision to undergo a double mastectomy and subsequent reconstruction.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 28-Sep-2015
JAMA Internal Medicine
Computer-aided detection does not improve breast cancer screening
In the largest study to date of computer-aided detection (CAD) for mammography, the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium found CAD improved no measure of accuracy of screening mammography: how often cancers were detected, how often something was incorrectly labeled as cancer, how often they were missed -- and may even have missed more cancers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Katie Marquedant
KMarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Group Health Research Institute

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Post-diagnosis aspirin improves survival in all gastrointestinal cancers
Aspirin improves survival in patients with tumors situated throughout the gastrointestinal tract, results from a large study in The Netherlands show.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
ERS International Congress 2015
Differences found between smokers and non-smokers who develop lung cancer
Tobacco smoke is known to be the main risk factor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although non-smokers can get it too. The incidence among non-smokers is increasing in many countries. Now a group of Portuguese researchers has found significant differences in clinical particularities and survival between smokers and non-smokers who develop NSCLC.

Contact: Lauren Anderson
lauren.anderson@europeanlung.org
31-655-467-578
European Lung Foundation

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Combining 2 targeted therapies results in melanoma patients living significantly longer
Latest results from a trial of a combination of two targeted therapies (dabrafenib and trametinib) to treat advanced melanoma have shown that patients are living significantly longer on the combined therapy than patients treated with another drug, vemurafenib, when used alone.
GlaxoSmithKline

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Annals of Oncology
Hormonal therapy may prevent ovarian failure and preserve fertility in breast cancer
Young women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer may be more likely to remain fertile if they also receive hormonal treatment.
Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO
Cancer, sinusitis, tinnitus, and exposure to tobacco smoke
Research to be presented tomorrow at the 2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPOSM of the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) spans across the otolaryngology specialty.

Contact: Lindsey Walter
newsroom@entnet.org
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
18th ECCO - 40th ESMO European Cancer Congress
Atezolizumab set to change refractory lung cancer treatment
Atezolizumab is set to substantially change treatment strategies for patients with refractory lung cancer, according to Dr. Martin Reck, Chief Oncology Physician in the Department of Thoracic Oncology, Hospital Grosshansdorf, Germany. Reck's comments came as the results from the POPLAR and BIRCH studies showing the first results of efficacy with atezolizumab across lines were presented at the European Cancer Congress 2015 (ECC 2015) in Vienna, Austria.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
New England Journal of Medicine
Nivolumab improves the proportion of lung cancer patients alive after more than a year
Updated results from the CheckMate 057 phase III clinical trial show that nivolumab continues to show an overall survival benefit compared to docetaxel in patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Drug combination improves progression-free survival in melanoma patients
Patients with advanced melanoma skin cancer survive for longer without their disease progressing if they have been treated with a combination of two drugs, nivolumab and ipilimumab, than with either of these drugs alone. New results show that these patients also do better regardless of their age, stage of disease and whether or not they have a cancer-driving mutation in the BRAF gene.
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Rare cancer responds unusually well to new treatment
Results from a multi-center randomized international trial of an innovative treatment show a marked improvement in the length of time patients with mid-gut neuroendocrine tumors live without the disease getting worse.
Advanced Accelerator Applications

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Results of international trial show promise in rare, difficult to treat cancer
An international team of researchers has shown that the use of the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, can delay tumour growth among both gastrointestinal and lung neuroendocrine tumours. This is particularly important for patients with lung NETs because there is currently no approved treatment for such cases.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
ERS International Congress 2015
Lung cancer survival rates improve with CT scan follow-up
Patients with recurrent lung cancer have better post-surgery survival rates if their management includes a follow-up program based on computer tomography of the chest, according to new findings.

Contact: Lauren Anderson
lauren.anderson@europeanlung.org
31-655-467-578
European Lung Foundation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Cancer Discovery
Genetic screening of brain metastases could reveal new targets for treatment
Unravelling the genetic sequences of cancer that has spread to the brain could offer unexpected targets for effective treatment.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Childhood cancers in Europe: Progress has been made, but much remains to be done
Each year in Europe, 6,000 young people die from cancer, and two-thirds of those who survive suffer from treatment-related side effects. Although there has been considerable progress in the treatment of childhood cancers over the past few decades, and cancer in childhood is rare, these are major problems that need to be overcome, says a report from SIOPE, the European Society for Paediatric Oncology.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress
Everolimus improves progression-free survival for patients with advanced, nonfuctional neuroendocrine tumors
In an international Phase III randomized study, everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, has shown to dramatically improve progression-free survival for patients with advanced, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors of the lung and gastrointestinal tract.

Contact: Lany Kimmons
rlkimmons@mdanderson.org
713-563-5801
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
A large real-life study shows trabectedin confers long-term efficacy in STS
A prospective, large real-life study with an investigational transcription inhibitor confers long term-efficacy in patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
PharmaMar

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Treatment of elderly breast cancer patients varies between different European countries
Largest international comparison of the treatment of elderly patients with breast cancer have shown there are substantial differences in the use of surgery, hormone therapy and chemotherapy between European countries.
European Society of Surgical Oncology

Contact: Kay Roche
kay@rochewriting.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Cancer Discovery
Genetic profiles of brain metastases differ from those of primary tumors
A new study finds that, while brain metastases share some genetic characteristics with the primary tumors from which they originated, they also carry unique genetic mutations, indicating that the evolutionary pathways of the metastatic and the primary tumors have diverged, which may change sensitivities to targeted therapy drugs.
National Institutes of Health, Brain Science Foundation, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, American Brain Tumor Association, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Mary Kay Foundation

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Migrants and refugees: Nationality and social status affect cancer care quality
Access to quality cancer care is still a big issue in Europe, and there is great heterogeneity in the availability of drugs, screening programs and resources among countries. Neglected cancer populations exist with lower rates of early diagnosis and treatment compliance. Migrants and refugees are one of those.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Differences between tumors of younger and older colorectal cancer patients
Tumors in younger colorectal cancer patients may be molecularly distinct from those of older patients, and that these differences are related to the way genes are switched on and off (epigenetics) in the tumors of the younger patients and may lead to better treatment options.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
2015 Experimental Biology
Research shows dried plums can reduce risk of colon cancer
Researchers from Texas A&M University and the University of North Carolina have shown a diet containing dried plums can positively affect microbiota, also referred to as gut bacteria, throughout the colon, helping reduce the risk of colon cancer.
California Dried Plum Board

Contact: Dr. Nancy Turner
n-turner@tamu.edu
979-847-8714
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
EBioMedicine
COPD heightens deadly lung cancer risk in smokers
Smokers who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder may face nearly twice the risk of getting small cell lung cancer -- the deadliest form of lung cancer -- than smokers who don't have COPD, according to a large worldwide study led by researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
New England Journal of Medicine
Breakthrough study demonstrates survival advantage with immune checkpoint inhibitor for advanced kidney cancer patients
For the first time, an immune checkpoint inhibitor has been proven to increase survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma, a patient population for whom treatment options are currently limited.

Contact: Clayton R. Boldt, Ph.D.
crboldt@mdanderson.org
713-792-9518
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1290.

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