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Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1297.

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Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Continuous joint use of estrogen and progestin lowers risk of EC in postmenopausal women
Adding continuous progestin to estrogen has been shown to lower the risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women according to a study published Dec. 14 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Cancer Cell
Experimental drugs that change energy supply in cells could slow brain tumor growth
Experimental drugs that alter cell metabolism also halted tumor growth and extended survival in mice with cancers linked to changes in the same gene, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center, its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
American Society for Cell Biology 2015
Brain cancer self-organizes into streams, swirls, and spheres
Brain cancer is not anarchy, say researchers but highly organized--self-organized. At ASCB 2015, they report that glioma cells build tumors by self-organizing into streams,10-20 cells wide, that obey a mathematically predicted pattern for autonomous agents flowing together. These streams drag along slower gliomas, may block entry of immune cells, and swirl around a central axis containing glioma stem cells that feed the tumor's growth.

Contact: John Fleischman
jfleischman@ascb.org
513-706-0212
American Society for Cell Biology

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Cancer Cell
Mass. General study identifies potential treatment target for IDH1-mutant cancers
A Massachusetts General Hospital-based research team has identified a potential new treatment target for tumors -- including a significant percentage of malignant brain tumors -- driven by mutations in an important metabolic enzyme.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Society for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Japan Foundation, KANAE Foundation

Contact: Terri Ogan
togan@partners.org
617-726-0954
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 13-Dec-2015
American Society for Cell Biology 2015
Cancer cell collaborators smooth the way for cancer cells to metastasize
At ASCB 2015, Vanderbilt researchers show how metastasizing tumors use non-cancerous fibroblasts to make a migration highway through surrounding extracellular matrix.

Contact: John Fleischman
jfleischman@ascb.org
513-706-0212
American Society for Cell Biology

Public Release: 12-Dec-2015
Journal of Radiation Oncology
Suicide gene therapy kills prostate tumor cells
Results from a long-term clinical trial conducted by cancer researchers at Houston Methodist Hospital show that combining radiation treatment with 'suicide gene therapy' provides a safe and effective one-two punch against the disease.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, General Clinical Research Center

Contact: Gale Smith
gsmith@houstonmethodist.org
281-627-0439
Houston Methodist

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
Gastroenterology
Scientists in Barcelona discover a potential treatment for cirrhosis
Cirrhosis is the main risk factor for liver cancer. The same target may be the key to preventing and treating this condition. Cirrhosis figures among the top 20 causes of death from disease worldwide.

Contact: Sònia Armengou
armengou@irbbarcelona.org
34-934-037-255
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
The Lancet
Drug provides another treatment option for an early form of breast cancer
The drug anastrozole is effective in treating an early form of breast cancer, according to a clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London. The results of the IBIS-II DCIS trial show that anastrozole is as effective as tamoxifen for this type of breast cancer and could offer a new treatment option for post-menopausal women.
Cancer Research UK, National Health and Medical Research Council Australia, Breast Cancer Research Fund, AstraZeneca

Contact: Joel Winston
j.winston@qmul.ac.uk
44-207-882-7943
Queen Mary University of London

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
DCIS patients receiving anastrozole reported symptoms different from those receiving tamoxifen
Analysis of patient-reported outcomes (PRO), a secondary endpoint of the phase III, NSABP B-35 clinical trial, in which anastrazole and tamoxifen were compared in postmenopausal women with ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) who underwent lumpectomy plus radiotherapy, found that there were no differences in outcomes related to quality of life but some differences in outcomes related to symptoms in the two treatment groups, according to data presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, AstraZeneca

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
The Lancet
No significant differences in recurrence rates among women with DCIS taking anastrozole or tamoxifen
Postmenopausal women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) had similar outcomes with disease recurrence whether they took tamoxifen or the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole for five years after surgery, but women in the two groups had different side effects, according to results from the phase III IBIS-II DCIS clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
Cancer Research UK, National Health and Medical Research Council Australia, Breast Cancer Research Fund, AstraZeneca

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
T-DM1 improved overall survival for heavily pretreated patients with HER2-positive breast cancer
Among patients with HER2-positive, metastatic breast cancer that had progressed despite treatment with two or more forms of HER2-targeted therapy (trastuzumab [Herceptin] and lapatinib [Tykerb]), median overall survival was increased for those treated with trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1 [Kadcyla]) compared with those who received treatment of physician's choice, according to results from the phase III TH3RESA clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
Roche

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Review explores cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in people with mental illness
A new report suggests that healthcare system and societal factors are just as critical as individual lifestyle factors in creating health disparities among people with metal illness.

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Fallopian tube organoids promise better understanding of ovarian cancer and infertility
A new way of growing Fallopian tube cells in culture is expected to give a boost to our understanding and prevention of female genital diseases, such as infertility, inflammatory disease, and ovarian cancer.

Contact: Thomas F. Meyer
meyer@mpiib-berlin.mpg.de
49-302-846-0400
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
Current Biology
Healthy or sick? Tiny cell bubbles may hold the answer
Rutgers scientists have uncovered biological pathways in the roundworm that provide insight into how tiny bubbles released by cells can have beneficial health effects, like promoting tissue repair, or may play a diabolical role and carry disease signals for cancer or neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.

Contact: Robin Lally
rlally@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0557
Rutgers University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
Thyroid
Thyroid cancer patients report poor quality of life despite 'good' diagnosis
Thyroid cancer survivors report poor quality of life after diagnosis and treatment compared with other patients who are diagnosed with more lethal cancers, according to new research from the University of Chicago Medicine. The findings, published in the journal Thyroid, shed light on a rarely studied outcome for a growing group of patients who are expected to soon account for 10 percent of all of American cancer survivors.

Contact: Ashley Heher
ashley.heher@uchospitals.edu
773-702-0025
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
American Society for Cell Biology
Non-small cell lung cancers can be sorted in clusters by endocytic changes
Endocytosis is not normal in cancer cells but how dysregulated the process is in cancer cells has just been revealed by Sarah Elkin and colleagues in the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center lab of Sandra Schmid. The researchers used three endocytic pathways as markers to sort out 29 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines into two distinct clusters characterized by their endocytic dysfunction.

Contact: John Fleischman
jfleischman@ascb.org
513-706-0212
American Society for Cell Biology

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
MSK studies highlight potential of liquid biopsy at San Antonio Breast Cancer Meeting
Information gleaned from a liquid biopsy may help predict how individual women with advanced breast cancer will respond to certain therapies as well as reveal genetic mutations that can impact prognosis, according to two new studies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Physician-in-Chief José Baselga and physician-scientist Sarat Chandarlapaty. The studies were presented this week at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

Contact: Caitlin Hool
hoolc@mskcc.org
212-639-3573
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Cell Stem Cell
3-D map of human genome reveals relationship between mutations and disease development
Whitehead Institute researchers have created a map of the DNA loops that comprise the three dimensional (3-D) structure of the human genome and contribute to gene regulation in human embryonic stem cells. The location of genes and regulatory elements within this chromosomal framework will help scientists better navigate their genomic research, establishing relationships between mutations and disease development.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Austrian Science Fund/Erwin Schroedinger Fellowship, Simons Foundation

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
JAMA Oncology
Delaying chemotherapy in breast cancer patients reduces overall survival, especially for those with triple-negative breast cancer
Postponing the start of adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 90 days following surgery may significantly increase risk of death for breast cancer patients, particularly those with triple-negative breast cancer, according to a new study from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Clayton R. Boldt, Ph.D.
crboldt@mdanderson.org
713-792-9518
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Mastectomy plus reconstruction has highest rate of complication, complication-related costs of guideline-concordant therapies for early breast cancer
In a review of guideline-concordant treatment modalities for women with early stage breast cancer, mastectomy and reconstruction had the highest rate of complications and complication-related costs, regardless of age.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers discover novel role of TBK1 protein in cell division
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have found that a protein called TBK1 plays an important role in the process of cell division, especially at a stage called mitosis.

Contact: Steve Blanchard
steve.blanchard@moffitt.org
813-745-1718
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Why does tamoxifen work better in some women?
New studies add to questions about predicting whether tamoxifen will be effective in an individual breast cancer patient.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
ACNP 54th Annual Meeting
Neuropsychopharmacology
Active ingredient in magic mushrooms reduces anxiety and depression in cancer patients
Psilocybin, found in magic mushrooms, decreased anxiety and depression in patients diagnosed with life-threatening cancer. In a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology by Roland Griffiths of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, patients who received a psilocybin dose that altered perception and produced mystical-type experiences, reported significantly less anxiety and depression compared with patients who received a low dose of the drug. The positive effects lasted 6 months.

Contact: Laura Bersacola-Hill
lhill@acnp.org
615-498-9032
American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists learn how poxviruses defeat the body's host defense
Research shows how smallpox, a feared bioterrorism agent, and other poxviruses overcome the defenses of their hosts. Implications extend to cancer therapy, said a senior author of the work, conducted at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Combined imaging modalities may change cancer management
PET/CT and whole-body MRI detect extraskeletal disease that may change the management of high-risk breast and prostate cancer patients, according to a recent study reported in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. In addition, the combined administration of F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in a single PET/CT scan showed significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than alternative methods for the detection of skeletal lesions.
GE Healthcare

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1297.

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