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Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1262.

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Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Cell
Before there will be blood
In a paper published Nov. 20 in the journal Cell, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine describe the surprising and crucial involvement of a pro-inflammatory signaling protein in the creation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during embryonic development, a finding that could help scientists to finally reproduce HSCs for therapeutic use.
Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Fundación Séneca, Agencia Regional de Ciencia y Tecnología de la Región de Murcia, National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Cell
Migration negation
Researchers have now identified a cellular culprit that should help researchers better understand how metastasis begins. Their findings may also inform the design of new treatments to combat it.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Cell
A cause of age-related inflammation found
As animals age, their immune systems gradually deteriorate, a process called immunosenescence. It is associated with systemic inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders, as well as with many cancers. The causes underlying this age-associated inflammation, and how it leads to diseases, are poorly understood. New work sheds light on one protein's involvement in suppressing immune responses in aging fruit flies.

Contact: Yixian Zheng
zheng@ciwemb.edu
410-246-3032
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
ecancermedicalscience
Woman's genes give clue for unique liver cancer treatment
A 47-year-old American woman with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is the first person with her condition to receive a uniquely personalized treatment based on her genetic profile. 'Using the information from the genetic makeup of our patient's cancer, we were able to formulate a personalized treatment,' says Dr. Arturo Loaiza-Bonilla of the University of Pennsylvania, lead author of the case report published in ecancermedicalscience.

Contact: Katie Foxall
katie@ecancer.org
44-011-790-94899
ecancermedicalscience

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Sorting bloodborne cancer cells to better predict spread of disease
For most cancer patients, primary tumors are often not the most deadly. Instead, it is the metastatic tumors -- tumors that spread from their original location to other parts of the body -- that are the cause of most cancer deaths. Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a diagnostic tool to investigate traveling cancer cells and improve health outcomes, published in the leading Chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie.

Contact: Jef Ekins
j.ekins@utoronto.ca
416-946-7036
University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery
Location of oral cancers differs in smokers, nonsmokers
The location of oral cancers differed in smokers and nonsmokers with nonsmokers having a higher proportion of cancers occur on the edge of the tongue, according to a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Contact: Christopher F.L. Perry
admin@brisbaneent.com.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Further evidence of potential for new anti-cancer drug
Manchester scientists have shown that a new drug inhibits the growth of tumors in the lab and that its effectiveness is improved by combining it with radiotherapy -- suggesting a new approach that could be used in the clinic.
Medical Research Council, AstraZeneca

Contact: Jamie Brown
Jamie.brown@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-58383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
JAMA Surgery
Increase in incidence of colorectal cancer in young adults, rate expected to rise
While the incidence of colorectal cancer in people 50 years or older has declined, the incidence among people 20 to 49 years has increased, according to a report published online by JAMA Surgery.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
GigaScience
Secure genetic data moves into the fast lane of discovery
A new web-based platform called GWATCH provides visualization tools for identifying disease-associated genetic markers from privacy-protected human data without risk to patient privacy. This dynamic online tool facilitates disease gene discovery via automation presented with intuitive data visualization tools: results are shown in three dimensions via a scrolling (Guitar Hero-like) chromosome highway. GWATCH provides an extremely useful, visually appealing bird's-eye view of positive disease-association results, while all sensitive information remain secure behind firewalls.
Russian Ministry of Science, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Scott Edmunds
scott@gigasciencejournal.com
852-361-03531
GigaScience

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Tobacco Control
Teens close to high number of tobacco shops more likely to smoke
Teenagers are much more likely to take up smoking if they live in neighborhoods with a large number of shops that sell tobacco products, a study suggests.
Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy

Contact: Corin Campbell
corin.campbell@ed.ac.uk
44-013-165-02246
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
CT lung screening appears cost-effective
In 2010 the National Lung Screening Trial showed that screening for cancer with low-dose CT scans could reduce mortality by 20 percent compared to using chest X-rays. But is it cost-effective? A new study's calculations reveal that it is, but that depends on assuming many answers to questions that remain open.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Risk stratification model may aid in lung cancer staging and treatment decisions
A risk stratification model based on lymph node characteristics confirms with a high level of confidence the true lack of lung cancer in lymph nodes adequately sampled with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration and classified as negative.

Contact: Murry W. Wynes
murry.wynes@iaslc.org
720-325-2945
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Stem Cells
Study gives insight into breast cancer recurrence
Work by University of Manchester scientists has explored what allows some cases of ductal carcinoma in situ, a non-invasive form of breast cancer, to resist treatment and come back, as well as identifying a potential new target to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy.
Breast Cancer Campaign, Royal College of Surgeons of England, Pfizer

Contact: Jamie Brown
Jamie.brown@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-58383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
JAMA Surgery
Young patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer anticipated to nearly double by 2030
In the next 15 years, more than one in 10 colon cancers and nearly one in four rectal cancers will be diagnosed in patients younger than the traditional screening age, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Cancer Discovery
Bone drug should be seen in a new light for its anti-cancer properties
Australian researchers have shown why calcium-binding drugs commonly used to treat people with osteoporosis, or with late-stage cancers that have spread to bone, may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton, including breast cancer.

Contact: Alison Heather
a.heather@garvan.org.au
61-292-958-128
Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs
Studies show exercise therapy, acupuncture benefit breast cancer survivors
Two new studies from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain and swelling, and point to ways to enhance muscular strength and body image. The studies appear in a first of its kind monograph from the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs focusing on integrative oncology, which combines a variety of therapies, some non-traditional, for maximum benefit to cancer patients.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Lactose intolerants at lower risk of certain cancers: Study
People with lactose intolerance are at lower risk of suffering from lung, breast and ovarian cancers, according to a new study by researchers at Lund University and Region Skåne in Sweden.

Contact: Jianguang Ji
jianguang.ji@med.lu.se
46-403-91382
Lund University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
JAMA
Immune booster combined with checkpoint blocker improves survival in metastatic melanoma
Patients with metastatic melanoma who were treated with ipilimumab, an immune checkpoint blocker, survived 50 percent longer if they simultaneously received an immune stimulant.
US Public Health Service, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Gene 'switches' could predict when breast cancers will spread to the brain
Scientists have found a pattern of genetic 'switches' -- chemical marks that turn genes on or off -- that are linked to breast cancer's spread to the brain.

Contact: Simon Shears
simon.shears@cancer.org.uk
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Patients with emergency-diagnosed lung cancer report barriers to seeing their GP
Many patients whose lung cancer is diagnosed as an emergency in hospital reported difficulties in previously seeing their general practitioner.

Contact: Simon Shears
simon.shears@cancer.org.uk
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Hot flushes are going unrecognized, leaving women vulnerable
Hot flushes are one of the most distressing conditions faced by women who have been treated for breast cancer, but they are not being adequately addressed by health-care professionals and some women consider giving up their post cancer medication to try and stop them, a new study has shown.

Contact: Becky Attwood
r.attwood@soton.ac.uk
University of Southampton

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How important is long-distance travel in the spread of epidemics?
When modeling the spread of epidemics, such as the Ebola outbreak, scientists must take into account the long-distance hops now possible with international air travel. But how important are such long-distance jumps? A new model by biophysicists Oskar Hallatschek of UC Berkeley and Daniel Fisher of Stanford shows that how common long-range jumps are makes a big difference in the dispersal of a disease, that is, whether you get slow, rippling versus rapid metastatic spread.
Simons Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
EBioMedicine
Researchers engineer a 'smart bomb' to attack childhood leukemia
Fatih Uckun, Jianjun Cheng and their colleagues have taken the first steps towards developing a so-called 'smart bomb' to attack the most common and deadly form of childhood cancer -- called B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
University of Southern California Stem Cell's Regenerative Medicine Initiative, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health,

Contact: Cristy Lytal
lytal@med.usc.edu
323-442-2172
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Scientists uncover potential drug to tackle 'undruggable' fault in third of cancers
Scientists have found a possible way to halt one of the most common faults in many types of cancer.

Contact: Stephanie McClellan
Stephanie.McClellan@cancer.org.uk
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Trial results reveal first targeted treatment to boost survival for esophageal cancer
Patients with a specific type of esophageal cancer survived longer when they were given the latest lung cancer drug, according to trial results being presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference on Nov. 5.
Scottish Government's Chief Scientist Office, Cameron Clinical Academic Fellowship, Grampian Gastro-oesophageal Cancer Research Fund

Contact: Ailsa Stevens
ailsa.stevens@cancer.org.uk
44-151-707-4642
Cancer Research UK

Showing releases 1001-1025 out of 1262.

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