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Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Cell
In the sea, a deadly form of leukemia is catching
Outbreaks of leukemia that have devastated some populations of soft-shell clams along the east coast of North America for decades can be explained by the spread of cancerous tumor cells from one clam to another. Researchers call the discovery, reported in the Cell Press journal Cell on April 9, 2015, 'beyond surprising.'
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Cell
A call to action for 2 cancer research fronts to join forces
Targeting the genetic drivers of cancer works in clinical trials, but cancers often resurface shortly thereafter. Immunotherapy -- which primes a patient's immune cells to attack tumors -- offers a longer-lasting response, but only in a fraction of people. The way forward, argue James P. Allison and Padmanee Sharma in a Review published April 9 in Cell, is to shift funding and research priorities so that these complementary approaches can be combined.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
JAMA Dermatology
Melanoma surgery delays are common for Medicare patients
One in five Medicare patients with melanoma experience delays in getting surgery, a Yale study found.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Yale Cancer Center/P30 Cancer Center Support Grant

Contact: Ziba Kashef
ziba.kashef@yale.edu
203-436-9317
Yale University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
JAMA Surgery
MRI screening program for individuals at high risk of pancreatic cancer
A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based screening program for individuals at high risk of pancreatic cancer identified pancreatic lesions in 16 of 40 (40 percent) of patients, of whom five underwent surgery, according to a report published online by JAMA Surgery.

Contact: Marco Del Chiaro, M.D., Ph.D.
marco.del-chiaro@karolinska.se
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
JAMA Dermatology
Delay of surgery for melanoma common among Medicare patients
In a study that included more than 32,000 cases of melanoma among Medicare patients, approximately one in five experienced a delay of surgery that was longer than 1.5 months, and about 8 percent of patients waited longer than three months for surgery, according to an article published online by JAMA Dermatology.

Contact: Ziba Kashef
ziba.kashef@yale.edu
203-436-9317
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Genetic screening could improve breast cancer prevention
A test for a wide range of genetic risk factors could improve doctors' ability to work out which women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer, a major study of more than 65,000 women has shown. Improving the accuracy of risk analysis using genetic screening could guide breast cancer prevention in several ways -- for instance by offering high-risk women increased monitoring, personalized advice and preventative therapies.
Cancer Research UK, European Union, Breakthrough Breast Cancer, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Genome Medicine
We may be looking at wrong mutation for breast cancer treatment
A leading gene candidate that has been the target of breast cancer drug development may not be as promising as initially thought, according to research published in open-access journal Genome Medicine.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2243
BioMed Central

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
8 reasons the US Surgeon General should announce that UV tanning causes skin cancer
'In 1964 when the Surgeon General finally reported that smoking causes lung cancer, awareness and policy followed. Smoking rates declined and lung cancer rates have too. It's time for the Surgeon General to say the same thing about UV tanning,' says Robert P. Dellavalle, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.P.H., investigator at the CU Cancer Center.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Biologists identify brain tumor weakness
A new discovery could offer more effective drugs to combat brain tumors.

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
No association between lung cancer risk in women and reproductive history or hormone use
The Women's Health Initiative Studies, a large prospective study of lung cancer, found no strong associations between lung cancer risk and a wide range of reproductive history variables and only revealed weak support for a role of hormone use in the incidence of lung cancer.

Contact: Murry Wynes
Murry.Wynes@iaslc.org
720-325-2945
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
A digital field guide to cancer cells
Scientists are mapping the habits of cancer cells, turn by microscopic turn. Using advanced technology and an approach that merges engineering and medicine, a Yale University-led team has compiled some of the most sophisticated data yet on the elaborate signaling networks directing highly invasive cancer cells. Think of it as a digital field guide for a deadly scourge.

Contact: Jim Shelton
james.shelton@yale.edu
203-432-3881
Yale University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature Cell Biology
Breast cancer research uncovers the fountain of youth
The Fountain of Youth has been discovered and it's not in Florida as Ponce de Leon claimed. Instead, it was found in the mammary glands of genetically modified mice. A research team led by professor Rama Khokha has found that when two factors that control tissue development are removed, you can avoid the impact of aging.

Contact: Liam Mitchell
liam.mitchell@utoronto.ca
416-978-4672
University of Toronto

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Researchers urge stronger warning for indoor tanning risks
The US Surgeon General should declare that indoor ultraviolet radiation tanning causes skin cancer, according to an article published today by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Robert P. Dellavalle, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.P.H., associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, is the corresponding author of the article, which says there is enough evidence for the Surgeon General to clearly state that use of indoor tanning beds causes skin cancer.

Contact: Mark Couch
mark.couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Tumor cells that mimic blood vessels could help breast cancer spread to other sites
A team of researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute at the University of Cambridge has shown in a mouse model that the ability of tumor cells to form tubular networks that mimic blood vessels can help drive metastasis, the spread of breast cancer to different sites in the body.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health, Kathryn W. Davis, Hope Funds for Cancer Research, Boehringer Ingelheim Funds

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
WSU study finds cigarette warning labels may be more effective with imagery
Young adults are more likely to appreciate the dangers of smoking when warnings are presented in images as well as text, according to a new study by a Washington State University Vancouver psychologist.
Washington State University

Contact: Renee Magnan
renee.magnan@vancouver.wsu.edu
360-546-9403
Washington State University

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
JAMA
Risk of breast and ovarian cancer may differ by type of BRCA1, BRCA2 mutation
In a study that involved more than 31,000 women who are carriers of disease-associated mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, researchers identified mutations that were associated with significantly different risks of breast and ovarian cancers, findings that may have implications for risk assessment and cancer prevention decision making among carriers of these mutations, according to a study in the April 7 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Central signaling pathway in lymphoma can be blocked successfully
Cancer researchers from the University of Zurich have identified a key signaling pathway in B-cell lymphoma, a malignant type of blood cancer. They demonstrate that the signaling pathway can be blocked using compounds that are already in clinical development. This finding might be extremely important for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disease in the future.

Contact: Anne Müller
mueller@imcr.uzh.ch
41-433-559-535
University of Zurich

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
JAMA
Risk of breast and ovarian cancer may differ by type of BRCA1, BRCA2 mutation
Researchers have identified mutations that are associated with significantly different risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Authors say the results -- which show that some mutations confer higher risks of breast cancer, while other mutations show higher risks of ovarian cancer -- may lead to more effective cancer risk assessment, care and prevention strategies for health care providers and carriers. The results are published in the April 7 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Health Affairs
Cost of cancer drugs varies widely based on who's paying
Uninsured cancer patients are asked to pay anywhere from two to 43 times what Medicare would pay for chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Contact: Thania Benios
thania_benios@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Cancer Biology & Therapy
Physicians pioneer the use of stereotactic body radiation for deadly kidney cancer complication
UT Southwestern Medical Center Kidney Cancer Program investigators have published what is believed to be the first reported successful use of stereotactic body radiation therapy for an often deadly complication of kidney cancer.

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Human Genome Variation
A better biomarker to predict cetuximab response in CRC patients
Scientists at Insilico Medicine Inc. and Champions Oncology Inc. have successfully demonstrated a method to predict response to cetuximab in patients with colorectal cancer using OncoFinder pathway activation strength. The study identified a novel prognostic marker in colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab.

Contact: Qingsong Zhu
zhu@insilicomedicine.com
410-710-9674
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Stem Cells
Moffitt researchers discover novel mechanism controlling lung cancer stem cell growth
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers discovered a novel mechanism that plays an important role in the maintenance of lung cancer stem cells. This finding may lead to new potential therapeutic targets.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kim.Polacek@Moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics
Erythropoietin combined with radiation therapy does not improve local-regional control in anemic patients with head and neck cancer
Long-term analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9903 demonstrates that the addition of erythropoietin did not improve local-regional control for anemic patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who receive radiation therapy or chemoradiation, according to a study published in the April 1, 2015 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Childhood cancer survivors face chronic health problems
Childhood cancer survivors have increased, but the majority of those who have survived face chronic health problems, diseases and disability related to treatment, reports a new study. The study is the first to estimate the national prevalence of treatment-related chronic disease among survivors of childhood cancer. Simply curing cancer is no longer enough, scientists said.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
Marla-Paul@Northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals
Can cancer vaccines prolong survival?
Therapeutic anti-cancer vaccines developed to treat metastatic disease such as advanced prostate cancer or melanoma rarely have a noticeable effect on the tumor but have been associated with a statistically significant increase in patient survival. Robert O. Dillman, M.D., NeoStem Inc., asserts that 'overall survival' rather than 'progression-free survival' should be the gold standard for evaluating the efficacy of cancer vaccines in clinical trials, in a provocative new article published in Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Showing releases 1026-1050 out of 1316.

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