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Showing releases 1026-1050 out of 1381.

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Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
AACR: Breast cancer stem cells radicalize normal neighbors for purpose of metastasis
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 shows that stem-like breast cancer cells secrete molecules that allow neighboring, otherwise anchored cells to metastasize.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
AACR: Life-preserver microbubbles float tumor cells for analysis
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 demonstrates the use of gas microbubbles to selectively attach to and float circulating tumor cells from blood samples, allowing analysis of the isolated cells.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Study shows how TRK-fusion lung cancer escapes LOXO-101, offering new treatment strategies
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 pinpoints ways that cancer cells evolve to resist the drug LOXO-101

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
SPF30 sunscreens delay melanoma incidence in preclinical model
Application of sun protection factor 30 sunscreen prior to exposure to ultraviolet-B light delayed melanoma onset in a mouse model of the disease, according to data from a team at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. This data suggest that the mouse model can be used to identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents. Initial findings are being presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.
Pelotonia

Contact: Amanda Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Study drug LOXO-101 shows tumor regression in varied cancers
A phase I study of the drug LOXO-101 appears to significantly reduce tumors in patients with varied types of genetically defined cancer, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research 2016 Annual Meeting
Engineering T cells to treat pancreatic cancer
Dr. Sunil Hingorani, a member of the Clinical Research and Public Health Sciences divisions at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, will present recent groundbreaking developments in treating pancreas cancer with engineered T-cells at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 in New Orleans on April 16.
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/University of Washington Cancer Consortium Cancer Center, Giles W. and Elise G. Mead Foundation, Safeway Foundation, Maryanne Tagney and David Jones, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Rhonda Curry
rcurry@fredhutch.org
206-240-6011
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Journal of Women's Health
Women of color -- what we know and don't know about their unique health challenges
Women of color face both racial and gender disparities in the incidence, onset, and outcomes of diseases as diverse as cancer, cardiovascular disease, HIV infection and age-related disability. The unique health challenges these disparities present are examined in an article published in Journal of Women's Health.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
ELCC 2016 - European Lung Cancer Conference
Patients with EGFR expressing NSCLC benefit most from necitumumab added to chemotherapy
Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor expressing advanced squamous non-small-cell lung cancer benefit most from necitumumab added to gemcitabine and cisplatin chemotherapy, according to a subgroup analysis from the SQUIRE trial presented today at the European Lung Cancer Conference 2016 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
ELCC 2016 - European Lung Cancer Conference
Plasma genotyping to predict treatment benefit in patients with NSCLC
The benefit of plasma genotyping to predict treatment benefit in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is confirmed in three studies presented today at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) 2016 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Low fat diet helps postmenopausal women avoid deadly breast cancers
Women who stayed on a low fat diet for approximately eight years reduced their risk of death from invasive breast cancers and improved their survival rates.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Laura Mecoy
Lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
LA BioMed

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
The International Liver CongressTM 2016
Treatment for chronic hepatitis B linked to increased rates of colorectal and cervical cancer
A new study presented today demonstrates a potential link between treatment of long-term oral nucleos(t)ide analogues and an increased risk of colorectal (p=0.029) and cervical (p=0.049) cancer in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV). The study results were presented at The International Liver CongressTM 2016 in Barcelona, Spain.

Contact: ILC Press office
ilcpressoffice@ruderfinn.co.uk
44-020-743-83054
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Science Signaling
Researchers identify enzyme link between excessive heart muscle growth, cancer growth
UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells -- a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke.
National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, and the Comisión Nacional de Investigación Cientiffica y Tecnológica

Contact: Cathy Frisinger
cathy.frisinger@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Experimental drug guadecitabine found safe in patients with colorectal cancer
In a small, phase I clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say they show for the first time that the experimental drug guadecitabine (SGI-110) is safe in combination with the chemotherapy drug irinotecan and may overcome resistance to irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.
Astex Pharmaceuticals, Van Andel Research Institute SU2C/AACR Epigenetics Dream Team

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
First-ever nivolumab study to treat aggressive anal cancer appears promising
A rare malignancy known as squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) is on the increase, and now researchers have reported results of the first-ever phase II clinical trial results for treatment with the immunotherapy drug nivolumab.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research 2016 Annual Meeting
Fred Hutch research highlights at AACR Annual Meeting 2016
Below are brief summaries highlighting several presentations by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center scientists at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 in New Orleans from April 16-20. Each contains a link to the related embargoed Fred Hutch news release. For researcher bios, photos and more, please visit fredhutch.org/media.

Contact: Rhonda Curry
rcurry@fredhutch.org
206-240-6011
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Preliminary study: Antibody therapy reduces cancer stem cells in multiple myeloma
An experimental antibody treatment decreased by half the number of cancer stem cells that drive the growth of tumors in nearly all patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow and bone tissue, according to results of a preliminary clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists.
MedImmune Inc

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital research at AACR Annual Meeting
The American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting features the work of St. Jude researchers.

Contact: Frannie Marmorstein
media@stjude.org
901-595-0221
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
SPECT-MRI fusion minimizes surgery for diagnosis of early-stage cervical cancer patients
A recent study reported in the April issue of 'The Journal of Nuclear Medicine' found that cervical cancer patients without enlarged lymph nodes could benefit from SPECT-MRI imaging of their sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) to assess whether metastases are present.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
New England Journal of Medicine
Low-grade brain tumors: Radiation plus chemotherapy is best treatment, trial suggests
New clinical-trial findings show that patients with a low-grade form of brain cancer who are treated with radiation plus a combination of chemotherapy drugs have better survival than patients treated with radiation alone.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
MDI Biological Laboratory scientist identifies mechanism underlying peripheral neuropathy
Recent research by Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., of the MDI Biological Laboratory identifying the underlying mechanisms of peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage, has raised the prospect that drug therapies can be developed for the treatment of this condition, which causes pain, numbness and/or tingling in the hands and feet. The research was published March 28 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Stefanie Matteson
smatteso@mdibl.org
207-288-9880
Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Onco Targets and Therapy
Potential cholesterol-lowering drug molecule has prostate cancer fighting capabilities
Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. However, drug-resistant cancer cells can emerge during chemotherapy, limiting its effectiveness as a cancer-fighting agent. Researchers at the University of Missouri have proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of prostate cancer, but also can kill cancerous cells.
Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Program

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Biomaterials
Implantable device targets pancreatic cancer
Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now developed a small, implantable device that delivers chemotherapy drugs directly to pancreatic tumors.
Koch Institute and Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Bridge Project, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Koch Institute Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute, Deshpande Center for Innovation at MIT

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Public Library of Science
Combination therapy may offer better outcomes for patients with retinoblastoma
Researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have demonstrated that targeting survivin -- a protein that inhibits apoptosis or cell death -- enhances the effectiveness of chemotherapy in cells and mouse models of retinoblastoma (Rb), the most common malignant tumor of the eye in children.
National Institutes of Health, ThinkCure, Las Madrinas Endowment for Experimental Therapeutics in Ophthalmology

Contact: Debra Kain
dkain@chla.usc.edu
323-361-7628
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Implementation Science
How can lay health advisor programs be designed for maximum impact?
Lay health advisors who share similar backgrounds and values with the medically underserved groups they interact with have been shown to reduce health disparities. Looking to identify elements that can help make these advisors and the programs they support as effective as possible, researchers found that support from the sponsoring organization and clear role expectations are critical for their success. The study is one of the largest to date involving African-American lay health advisors.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
American Society of Breast Surgeons annual meeting
Protective mastectomies that preserve nipple safe for women at high breast cancer risk
Protective mastectomies that preserve the nipple and surrounding skin prevent breast cancer as effectively as more invasive surgeries for women with a genetic mutation called BRCA that raises their risk of developing breast cancer, a multi-institution study led by Mayo Clinic found.
National Institutes of Health Specialized Program of Research Excellence in Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Sharon Theimer
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Showing releases 1026-1050 out of 1381.

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