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Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1297.

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Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Annals of Oncology
Five out of six women at higher risk reject drugs to prevent breast cancer
Cancer Research UK scientists have found that five in six women with increased risk of breast cancer turn down drugs likely to prevent the disease.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Fiona Dennehy
fiona.dennehy@cancer.org.uk
020-346-96770
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
One-two punch of palbociclib and paclitaxel shows promise against advanced breast cancer
Combining the new breast cancer drug palbociclib with paclitaxel (Taxol) shrank tumors in nearly half of patient with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer, according to new research. The results will be presented Saturday at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (Abstract P6-13-08). A second study (Abstract P4-13-04), to be presented Friday provides new clues to how breast cancer develops resistance to the palbociclib, a common occurrence among many patients who take the drug.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-776-6063
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
SABCS15: 'Weeding the garden' with radiation while continuing breast cancer therapy
An ongoing phase IIR/III clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium seeks to answer an important question in the treatment of early metastatic breast cancer: Should surgery or stereotactic body radiation be used to 'weed the garden' of a few sites of metastasis while continuing treatment that may still be controlling the initial tumor?

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Nature
Textbooks on cells should be rewritten
Ground-breaking new Danish research has shown that the current scientific description of the human cell cycle needs to be revised. These findings could also lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches to target an Achilles' heel in different types of cancers.

Contact: Professor Ian.D.Hickson
iandh@sund.ku.dk
0045-51-29-78-77
University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Counseling with genetic cancer screening may increase knowledge and decrease anxiety
Many BRCA 1/2-negative patients choose to proceed with comprehensive testing for genetic mutations that increase cancer risk, and when presented with counseling before and after testing, most make informed decisions and experience decreased levels of anxiety, according to new research.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-776-6063
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Aspirin use does not improve outcomes for cancer patients, but may lower breast density
Aspirin does not appear to be protective or associated with improved clinical outcomes or survival among breast cancer patients with aggressive disease, the researchers of one study report. However, another study suggests aspirin may in fact help reduce breast tissue density, which could lead to earlier detection of some breast cancers.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-776-6063
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition
Young adults with ALL have encouraging survival with pediatric regimen
Using a pediatric chemotherapy regimen to treat young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) significantly improved their outcomes compared to what has historically been achieved with 'adult' treatment protocols, report Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Experimental drug is first targeted therapy to improve survival in high-risk AML patients
Midostaurin added to standard chemotherapy is the first targeted treatment to improve survival of a high-risk, genetically defined subgroup of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, reported Dr. Richard Stone, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, on behalf of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology group, in a plenary session at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in Orlando.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition
Three studies point to effectiveness of new therapies for multiple myeloma
Results of clinical trials show that new drug combinations can significantly extend the time in which multiple myeloma is kept in check in patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant forms of the disease

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Experimental drug is first targeted therapy to improve survival in high-risk AML patients
Midostaurin added to standard chemotherapy is the first targeted treatment to improve survival of a high-risk, genetically defined subgroup of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, reported Dr. Richard Stone, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, on behalf of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology group, in a plenary session at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in Orlando.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Nature Chemical Biology
Stanford engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution
Through evolution, DNA mutations generate more effective proteins. Humans have found many uses for these molecules -- as foods, industrial enzymes, anti-cancer drugs -- and scientists want to understand how to engineer better protein variants. Now Stanford engineers invented a technology, described in Nature Chemical Biology, which accelerates protein evolution for this purpose. It allows researchers to test millions of variants of a protein, choose the best one and determine the DNA sequence that creates it.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New England Journal of Medicine
Drug shows potential as safe and effective for most prevalent form of adult leukemia
Clinical results published in the OnLine First edition of New England Journal of Medicine show that the new drug acalabrutinib (ACP-196) promotes high response rates that are durable in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) while producing minimal side effects.
Four Winds Foundation, D. Warren Brown Foundation, The Sullivan Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Thomas, Al and Midge Lipkin, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Amanda J Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
ACS Nano
Tiny drug-laden 'popping bubbles' lead triple attack treatment for liver cancer
In an interdisciplinary collaboration between prominent academic and industry investigators, researchers have discovered a novel method for repositioning an FDA-approved anti-cancer compound so it can specifically target liver cancer tumors. A 'triple attack' technique combining chemotherapy, thermal ablation, and hyperthermia provided a highly targeted, yet minimally invasive approach.

Contact: Dipanjan Pan
dipanjan@illinois.edu
217-244-2938
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New technology may standardize sickle cell disease screening for infants
Researchers from Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented new research findings this weekend at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. The team presented promising findings related to new technology aimed at facilitating early detection of sickle cell disease for infants in developing countries.

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
1st tool to assess impact of co-illnesses in young cancer patients
A team of researchers from LSU Health New Orleans Schools of Public Health and Medicine and colleagues have developed the first index identifying and documenting concurrent but unrelated diseases among adolescents and young adults with cancer in collaboration with the NCI. Called the AYA HOPE Comorbidity Index, it's a tool that permits measurement of the impact of other medical conditions on health care services needs and the general health status of these young cancer patients.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Dark matter' in cancer genome prompts immune response
Researchers say the immune response comes from RNA with pathogen-like features.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Research Institute

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Multiple myeloma patient study shows promise for natural killer cells
A first-in-human Phase I study of multiple myeloma patients combined expanded cord blood-derived natural killer cells with transplantation of a patient's own stem cells and high-dose chemotherapy with little or none of the side effects seen with current treatments.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Cancer Research
Obesity contributes to metastasis in ovarian cancer patients
The influence of obesity on ovarian cancer metastasis had not been evaluated. Researchers from the University of Notre Dame and its affiliated Harper Cancer Research Institute unveil important new insights into the relationship between ovarian cancer and obesity.

Contact: Sharon Stack
Sharon.Stack.11@nd.edu
574-631-2518
University of Notre Dame

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Mount Sinai researchers present results at American Society of Hematology Meeting
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers will present several landmark studies at the 2015 American Society of Hematology meeting Dec. 5-8, 2015, in Orlando, including data analysis of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma that revealed insight into key biological processes and deeper understanding of cellular systems and disease mechanisms, and two combination therapy strategies that showed high response rates in patients with difficult-to-treat myeloma.

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Current Biology
Researchers find molecular shift that stops stem cells in Drosophila from making tumors
University of Oregon scientists studying neural stem cells in the fruit fly Drosophila have uncovered a molecular change experienced by stem cells as they age. During development of the central nervous system, a protein is expressed that blocks tumor formation.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Phase 1 results point to larger trial of enzalutamide and fulvestrant in breast cancer
At San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Jennifer Richer, PhD, and colleagues report promising results of a phase 1 clinical trial of combination enzalutamide and fulvestrant against advanced breast cancer.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
American Society for Cell Biology
Chasing invasive cancer cells with a laser
What makes invasive cancer cells behave differently than the other cells in the tumor from which they arise? Let's turn them red with a laser and find out. That's the experimental approach taken by scientists from Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University who will present their work on Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015 at the American Society for Cell Biology meeting in San Diego.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Loss of enzyme promotes tumor progression in endometrial cancer
Scientists have shown for the first time why loss of the enzyme CD73 in human cancer promotes tumor progression.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
PLOS ONE
Endangered foxes on Catalina Island get promising treatment to reduce ear tumors
Roughly half of Santa Catalina Island foxes were found to have ear canal tumors, but an ear mite treatment appears to be greatly helping the problem, according to two studies from the University of California, Davis.
Morris Animal Foundation, Institute for Wildlife Studies, Catalina Island Conservancy, US Navy and The Nature Conservancy

Contact: Winston Vickers
twvickers@ucdavis.edu
949-929-8643
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Regenstrief and IU study: Mindfulness-based stress reduction diminishes chemo brain
Participation in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program yields robust and sustained improvement in cancer-related cognitive impairment, a prevalent and potentially debilitating condition that affects attention, memory and executive function in survivors, according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine.
Walther Cancer Foundation, Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1297.

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