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Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1250.

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Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Annals of Internal Medicine
Embargoed news from Nov. 19, 2013 Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet
Below is information about articles being published in Annals of Internal Medicine. The information is not intended to substitute for the full article as a source of information. Annals of Internal Medicine attribution is required for all coverage.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Journal of Experimental Medicine
More than skin deep: New layer to the body's fight against infection
The layers of skin that form the first line of defense in the body's fight against infection have revealed a unanticipated secret. The single cell type that was thought to be behind the skin's immune defense has been found to have a doppelganger, with researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute showing the cells, despite appearing identical, are actually two different types.
Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, Victorian Government

Contact: Alan Gill
gill.a@wehi.edu.au
61-419-591-102
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Higher than normal levels of Vitamin B12 may indicate cancer risk
Vitamin B12 (cobalamin [Cbl]) is essential for maintaining healthy bodily function but higher than normal levels (reference range 200-600 pmol/L) may indicate that a patient is at risk of developing certain cancers, according to a study published November 18 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Previous studies had suggested an association between high Cbl levels and specific cancers.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
High-risk women get breast MRI -- but room remains for improvement
Breast MRI is a new technology that is recommended, in addition to (less-expensive) mammography, for screening women at high lifetime risk for breast cancer. Two papers in JAMA Internal Medicine (one national from Group Health and one regional from Harvard) show that breast MRI is now being used for screening more often than for diagnosis; and for screening it is overused in average-risk women and underused in higher-risk women, but that pattern is improving.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Rebecca Hughes
hughes.r@ghc.org
206-287-2055
Group Health Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
2 studies on the use of breast MRI
The overall use of breast magnetic resonance imaging has increased, with the procedure most commonly used for diagnostic evaluations and screenings, according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

Contact: Rebecca Hughes
hughes.r@ghc.org
206-287-2055
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
Nature Methods
Protein coding 'junk genes' may be linked to cancer
By using a new analysis method, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Science for Life Laboratory in Sweden have found close to one hundred novel human gene regions that code for proteins. A number of these regions are so-called pseudogenes, which may be linked to cancer.
Swedish Research Council, Swedish Cancer Society, EU FP7 project GlycoHit, and others

Contact: The Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-852-486-077
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
Genome Research
Scientists fingerprint single cancer cells to map cancer's family tree
Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, have used a DNA sequencing technique to identify mutations present across thousands of cancer cells in three patients with leukemia. The technique can identify the founding mutations from which a tumor evolved and uses computer software to map the cancer's family tree. The findings could be used to identify the key mutations that occur early in a tumor's development, allowing doctors to use targeted treatments more effectively.
Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research, Kay Kendall Leukaemia Fund, The Institute of Cancer Research

Contact: Graham Shaw
graham.shaw@icr.ac.uk
44-207-153-5380
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
Cell Cycle
Novel study charts aggressive prostate cancer
Many patients diagnosed with prostate cancer have indolent, slow-growing forms of the disease that are not life-threatening. However, more than 30,000 American men will die from aggressive prostate cancer this year alone. This sharp contrast between low-risk and aggressive disease presents a challenge for many researchers and physicians as they diagnose patients and also determine the prognosis of the men with the most aggressive forms of prostate cancer.
Steven Spielberg Discovery Fund, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Cara Lasala
cara.lasala@cshs.org
310-423-7798
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
5th European Multidisciplinary Meeting for Urological Cancer (EMUC)
Treatment of pelvic nodes individualized by inclusion of sentinel nodes is feasible with IMRT, says
Treatment of pelvic nodes individualized by inclusion of sentinel nodes can be easily integrated into an IMRT-based treatment strategy, according to the new study conducted by a group of researchers from Tübingen and Munich in Germany. The target volume concept seems to correctly cover individual pelvic nodes, which is indicated by the absence of any nodal recurrence within five years of follow-up.

Contact: Evgenia Starkova
e.starkova@uroweb.org
31-263-890-680
European Association of Urology

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Inflammatory skin damage in mice blocked by bleach solution, Stanford study finds
Processes that age and damage skin are impeded by dilute bleach solution, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Tipping the balance between senescence and proliferation
p53 is produced as various isoforms as the result of alternative splicing and promoter usage. One isoform, p53-beta, accelerates cellular arrest, while another isoform, delta-133p53 represses replicative senescence in cultured cells. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Abdul Mondal and colleagues at the National Cancer Institute evaluated the expression of these two p53 isoforms in T lymphocytes from healthy donors and donors with lung cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Biospecimen Repository Service

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Nov. 15, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Nov. 15, 2013, in the JCI<:Whole-brain circuit dissection in free-moving animals reveals cell-specific mesocorticolimbic networks; Impaired periamygdaloid-cortex prodynorphin is characteristic of opiate addiction and depression; Systems pharmacology identifies drug targets for Stargardt disease-associated retinal degeneration; Balancing GRK2 and EPAC1 levels prevents and relieves chronic pain, and more.
National Institutes of Health, Dermatology Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and others

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
5th European Multidisciplinary Meeting for Urological Cancer (EMUC)
Exercise training is effective as 'prehabilitation' before surgery in an elderly population
Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing assessment and exercise training in an elderly population is safe and well tolerated, according to the results of a new feasibility study, conducted in the UK.

Contact: Evgenia Starkova
e.starkova@uroweb.org
31-263-890-680
European Association of Urology

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
5th European Multidisciplinary Meeting for Urological Cancer (EMUC)
Multicenter study underscored the need of a uniform approach to the treatment of BCa
A new study, involving eight Italian research centers, concluded that an aligned approach to the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is much needed, while confirming previously published results on survival estimates of associated salvage therapies.

Contact: Evgenia Starkova
e.starkova@uroweb.org
31-263-890-680
European Association of Urology

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
5th European Multidisciplinary Meeting for Urological Cancer (EMUC)
Study unveils SINE's potential of re-activating tumor fighting proteins within a cell
A new study suggests that selective blockade of CRM1-dependent nuclear export represents a completely novel, tumor metastasis-selective approach for the treatment of advanced metastatic prostate cancers.

Contact: Evgenia Starkova
e.starkova@uroweb.org
31-263-890-680
European Association of Urology

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Clinical Epidemiology
Chronic diseases hinder good cancer survival rates
For bowel cancer patients with several other diseases, the one-year survival rate is 46 percent. For those without other diseases it is 80 percent. The same disparity characterizes other major types of cancer, shows new research based on figures from the Central Denmark Region.
Danish Cancer Society

Contact: Henrik Toft Sørensen
hts@dce.au.dk
45-87-16-82-15
Aarhus University

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Cancer
Drug offers promising approach to improve outcome for children with high-risk leukemia
Combining the drug gemtuzumab ozogamicin with conventional chemotherapy may improve the outcome of bone marrow transplantation for some children battling high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, according to a study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
5th European Multidisciplinary Meeting for Urological Cancer (EMUC)
Italian study examines clinical predictors of acute urinary symptoms after radiotherapy for prostate
An interim study by Italian researchers showed that using a modelling program together with IPSS and dosage measure can predict the severity of acute urinary symptoms in patients with early prostate cancer who underwent radiotherapy.

Contact: Evgenia Starkova
e.starkova@uroweb.org
European Association of Urology

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Molecular Cell
Researchers from IMIM describe a new function of 2 molecules involved in metastasis
Researchers from Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute lead by Dr. Sandra Peiró have described a new function for two key molecules involved in tumor progression. Transcription factor SNAIL1 and enzyme LOXL2 are essential to Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, meaning the process by which tumor cells are able to move and reach other tissues. The study places LOXL2 as a possible therapeutic target to treat cancers such as breast, lung or skin cancer.

Contact: Marta Calsina
mcalsina@imim.es
34-933-160-680
IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Oncotarget
Molecule common in some cancers, rheumatoid arthritis leads to potential therapy for both
A molecule that helps cells stick together is significantly over-produced in two very different diseases -- rheumatoid arthritis and a variety of cancers, including breast and brain tumors, concludes a new study. The scientists who made the discovery also found candidate drugs to inhibit the molecule, cadherin-11, one of which is already in a clinical trial.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense/Breast Cancer Research Program

Contact: Karen Mallet
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Copper intake makes tumors breathe
Copper imbalances have been associated with a number of pathological conditions, including cancer. Publishing in PNAS scientists at EPFL have found that copper in drinking water -- given at the maximum levels permitted in public water supplies -- accelerated the growth of tumors in mice. On the other hand, reducing copper levels reduced tumor growth. The study strongly suggests that copper is an essential factor for the growth of tumors in humans as well.

Contact: Lionel Pousaz
lionel.pousaz@epfl.ch
41-795-597-161
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Clinical Chemistry
Early stages of breast cancer could soon be diagnosed from blood samples
A new blood test for the early detection of breast cancer was shown in preliminary studies to successfully identify the presence of breast cancer cells from serum biomarkers.
US Department of Defense

Contact: David Bricker
dmbricker@houstonmethodist.org
832-667-5811
Houston Methodist

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
ACS Nano
Nanotech researchers' 2-step method shows promise in fighting pancreatic cancer
A new method of microscopic drug delivery that could greatly improve the treatment of deadly pancreatic cancer has been proven to work in mice at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Contact: Shaun Mason
smason@mednet.ucla.edu
310-206-2805
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
JAMA Dermatology
JAMA Dermatology: Social media brings academic journals to general readers
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Dermatology shows that a handful of academic journals have successfully leveraged social media to reach many times the readers of the journals themselves. But the majority of journals have yet to embrace social media and so lag behind professional organizations and patient advocacy groups in their ability to disseminate information in a culturally relevant way.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Cell Reports
Biologists ID new cancer weakness
MIT researchers find drugs that block new target gene could make many tumors more vulnerable to chemotherapy.
Austrian Science Fund, National Institutes of Health, Janssen Pharmaceutical, Koch Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Volkswagenstiftung, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and others

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Showing releases 1051-1075 out of 1250.

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