IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1076-1100 out of 1265.

<< < 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 > >>

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
eLife
A civil war inside our cells: Scientists show how our bodies fight off 'jumping genes'
There's a civil war going on inside every one of the 37 trillion cells in your body. Now, University of Michigan scientists have uncovered how your cells keep this war from causing too much collateral damage.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Scientists find way to target cells resistant to chemo
Scientists from The University of Manchester have identified a way to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy -- making them more open to treatment.

Contact: Kath Paddison
kath.paddison@manchester.ac.uk
01-612-755-2111
University of Manchester

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Cell
Surprising new insights into the PTEN tumor suppressor gene
Ever since it was first identified more than 15 years ago, the PTEN gene has been known to play an integral role in preventing the onset and progression of numerous cancers. Now investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center explain more precisely how PTEN exerts its anti-cancer effects and how its loss or alteration can set cells on a cancerous course.
National Inistitutes of Health, American-Italian Cancer Foundation

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Chemistry & Biology
Large-scale identification and analysis of suppressive drug interactions
Cell analysis finds drug interactions to be startlingly common: baker's yeast is giving scientists a better understanding of drug interactions, which are a major cause of illness and hospitalization worldwide.

Contact: Polly Thompson
pthompson@lunenfeld.ca
416-586-4800 x2046
Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Blood
Moffitt Cancer Center's phase 3 study may be game-changer for acute myeloid leukemia
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers say clinical trials for a new experimental drug to treat acute myeloid leukemia are very promising. Patients treated with CPX-351, a combination of the chemotherapeutic drugs cytarabine and daunorubicin, are showing better responses than patients treated with the standard drug formulation.
Celator Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of Pathology
Finnish team of researchers finds a mutation in a tumor of the jaw
A Finnish team of researchers was the first in the world to discover a gene mutation in ameloblastoma, which is a tumor of the jaw. Researchers have been searching for the mutation that causes ameloblastoma for decades, and this mutation has now been found in a patient living in the eastern part of Finland.

Contact: Kristiina Heikinheimo
krihei@uef.fi
358-505-642-669
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 24, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, April 24, 2014, in the JCI: 'Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood,' 'Receptors in the brain mediate the weight loss effects of GLP1 agonists,' 'Peripheral nervous system plasmalogens regulate Schwann cell differentiation and myelination,' 'Estrogen promotes Leydig cell engulfment by macrophages in male infertility,' and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Neoplasia
New study helps to explain why breast cancer often spreads to the lung
New research led by Alison Allan, Ph.D., a scientist at Western University and the Lawson Health Research Institute, shows why breast cancer often spreads or metastasizes to the lung. The breast cancer stem cell (CSC) has been shown to be responsible for metastasis in animal models, particularly to the lung. And this new research found CSCs have a particular propensity for migrating towards and growing in the lung because of certain proteins found there.
Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation-Ontario Region

Contact: Kathy Wallis
kwallis3@uwo.ca
519-661-2111 x81136
University of Western Ontario

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Breast cancer replicates brain development process
New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.
United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Oncotarget
Non-uniform genetic mutations identified in lung cancers could lead to targeted treatment
Victorian researchers have extensively studied three of the more common genetic mutations and their distribution across individual lung cancers to see if they matched up to regions of different tumor architecture under the microscope.

Contact: Liz Banks-Anderson
banks@unimelb.edu.au
61-383-444-362
University of Melbourne

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Annals of Oncology
Death rates from pancreatic cancer predicted to rise in Europe in 2014
Pancreatic cancer is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in men and women rather than decrease in 2014 and beyond, according to a comprehensive study published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology. The study by researchers in Italy and Switzerland shows that the proportion of deaths due to any sort of cancer is expected to fall overall in Europe in 2014.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Study shows aspirin can reduce colorectal cancer risks for those with specific gene
The humble aspirin may have just added another beneficial effect beyond its ability to ameliorate headaches and reduce the risk of heart attacks: lowering colon cancer risk among people with high levels of a specific type of gene.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amanda Petrak
amanda.petrak@case.edu
216-317-7347
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Cancer Research
Scientists identify cancer specific cell for potential treatment of gastric cancer
A team of scientists led by a researcher from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore has identified the cancer specific stem cell which causes gastric cancer. This discovery opens up the possibility of developing new drugs for the treatment of this disease and other types of cancers.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Nature
New target for prostate cancer resistant to anti-hormone therapies
Researchers have found a new target that could remain sensitive even when prostate cancer becomes resistant to current treatments.
Prostate Cancer Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Chemical Science
Following a protein's travel inside cells is key to improving patient monitoring, drug development
Virginia Tech chemical engineer Chang Lu and his colleagues have used a National Science Foundation grant to develop a technique to detect subcellular location of a protein.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Nystrom
tansy@vt.edu
540-231-4371
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
RI Hospital physician: Legalizing medical marijuana doesn't increase use among adolescents
Parents and physicians concerned about an increase in adolescents' marijuana use following the legalization of medical marijuana can breathe a sigh of relief. According to a new study at Rhode Island Hospital, which compared 20 years worth of data from states with and without medical marijuana laws, legalizing the drug did not lead to increased use among adolescents. The study is published online in advance of print in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslingsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Study identifies enzymes that help fix cancer-causing DNA defects
Purdue University researchers have identified an important enzyme pathway that helps prevent new cells from receiving too many or too few chromosomes, a condition that has been directly linked to cancer and other diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Purdue University Center for Cancer Research

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Practical Radiation Oncology
ASTRO issues guideline on the role of postoperative radiation therapy for endometrial cancer
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has issued a new guideline, 'The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline,' that details the use of adjuvant radiation therapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
michellek@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Gold nanoparticles help target, quantify breast cancer segments in a living cell
Purdue University researchers have developed a way to detect and measure cancer levels in a living cell by using tiny gold particles with tails of synthetic DNA.
National Science Foundation, Indiana Clinical Transitional Sciences Institute, Purdue Center for Cancer Research, Samsung

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
Cloaked DNA nanodevices survive pilot mission
By mimicking a viral strategy, scientists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have created the first cloaked DNA nanodevice that survives the body's immune defenses. Their success opens the door to smart DNA nanorobots that use logic to spot cancerous tissue and manufacture drugs on the spot to cripple it, as well as artificial microscopic containers called protocells that detect pathogens in food or toxic chemicals in drinking water.

Contact: Dan Ferber
dan.ferber@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-1547
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
False-positive mammogram anxiety has limited impact on women's well-being
Dartmouth researchers have found that the anxiety experienced with a false-positive mammogram is temporary and does not negatively impact a woman's overall well-being. Their findings are reported in 'Consequences of False-Positive Screening Mammograms,' which was published online in the April 21, 2014, JAMA Internal Medicine.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Two genes linked to inflammatory bowel disease
Cincinnati Cancer Center and University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute researcher Susan Waltz, Ph.D., and scientists in her lab have done what is believed to be the first direct genetic study to document the important function for the Ron receptor, a cell surface protein often found in certain cancers, and its genetic growth factor, responsible for stimulating cell growth, in the development and progression of inflammatory bowel disease.
Public Health Services, National Institutes of Health, US Veterans Administration, American Heart Association Great Rivers Affiliates

Contact: Katie Pence
katie.pence@uc.edu
513-558-4561
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Cell Death & Disease
Scientists pinpoint protein that could improve small cell lung cancer therapies
Approximately 15 percent of all lung cancers are small cell lung cancers, which grow rapidly and often develop resistance to chemotherapy. However, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have revealed new insights into the mechanisms leading to this resistance that may lead to improved therapies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Alaina Schneider
afschneider@vcu.edu
804-628-4578
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
AMP publishes curriculum recommendations for medical laboratory scientists
The Association for Molecular Pathology released a report today in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on recommendations for a molecular diagnostics curriculum at both the baccalaureate and master's levels of education.

Contact: Catherine Davidge
cdavidge@amp.org
Association for Molecular Pathology

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Annals of Oncology
EORTC and SIOG update expert opinion on management of elderly patients with NSCLC
In an article appearing in the Annals of Oncology, the EORTC Cancer in the Elderly Task Force and Lung Cancer Group along with the International Society for Geriatric Oncology have updated their expert opinion on managing treatment for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This update includes recommendations for screening, surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, treatment of locally advanced and metastatic disease as well as new data on patient preferences and geriatric assessment.
Fonds Cancer

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Showing releases 1076-1100 out of 1265.

<< < 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

EurekAlert!