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Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1427.

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Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cell
Scientists reveal alternative route for cell death
Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered a new pathway for mitochondrial cell death that involves the protein BCL-2 ovarian killer otherwise known as BOK. The discovery, which is described online in the journal Cell, may lead to new ways to trigger cell death in some types of cancer cells.

Contact: Barry Whyte
barry.whyte@stjude.org
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Science
There goes the neighborhood: Changes in chromosome structure activate cancer-causing genes
In a finding with enormous implications for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, Whitehead Institute scientists have discovered that breaches in looping chromosomal structures known as 'insulated neighborhoods' can activate oncogenes capable of fueling aggressive tumor growth.
National Institutes of Health, Erwin Schrödinger Fellowship from the Austrian Science Fund, Ludwig Graduate Fellowship funds, Laurie Kraus Lacob Faculty Scholar Award in Pediatric Translational Research, Hyundai Hope on Wheels

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cancer Cell
Breast cancer: An improved animal model opens up new treatments
EPFL scientists have developed an animal model for breast cancer that faithfully captures the disease. Tested on human breast tissue, this the most clinically realistic model of breast cancer to date.
European Union Seventh Framework Programme, European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations, Oncosuisse, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Science
Tumors contain the seeds of their own destruction
Scientists have made a groundbreaking discovery in understanding how the genetic complexity of tumors can be recognized and exploited by the immune system, even when the disease is at its most advanced stages.

Contact: Stephanie Mcclellan
stephanie.mcclellan@cancer.org.uk
020-346-95314
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
Regular aspirin use found to protect against overall cancer risk
An analysis of data from two major, long-term epidemiologic studies finds that the regular use of aspirin significantly reduces the overall risk of cancer, a reduction that primarily reflects a lower risk of colorectal cancer and other tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cell Reports
Common genetic variant in a tumor suppressor gene linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes
P53, a tumor suppressor referred to as has often been described as the 'guardian of the genome,' may also be the 'guardian of obesity.' New research found that a variant of the gene is heavily implicated in metabolism, which may lead to obesity and the development of type 2 diabetes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ben Leach
bleach@wistar.org
215-495-6800
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cell Reports
Blocking transfer of calcium to cell's powerhouse selectively kills cancer cells
Inhibiting the transfer of calcium ions into the cell's powerhouse is specifically toxic to cancer cells, suggesting new ways to fight the disease. Calcium addiction by mitochondria is a novel feature of cancer cells. This unexpected dependency on calcium transfer to the mitochondria for the survival of cancer cells surprised the researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Without ancestral gene life on Earth might not have evolved beyond slime
Researchers at the University of British Columbia have identified a common ancestral gene that enabled the evolution of advanced life over a billion years ago.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
How effective is Twitter to share cancer clinical trial information and recruit?
Could Twitter be a way to communicate with the public about cancer clinical trials and increase awareness and patient recruitment? A new research letter published online by JAMA Oncology considers that question.

Contact: Steve Graff
Stephen.Graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
Long-term aspirin use linked to lower risk for gastrointestinal tract cancers
Regular low doses of aspirin for at least six years was associated with a modestly reduced overall risk for cancer, primarily due to a lower risk for gastrointestinal tract cancer, especially colorectal cancers, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
Tapping into Twitter to help recruit cancer patients into #ClinicalTrials
Twitter may be an effective, untapped resource to stimulate interest in cancer clinical trials and boost enrollment, physicians at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania suggest in a new research letter in JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
JAMA Dermatology
Study of patients with melanoma finds most have few moles
Most patients with melanoma had few moles and no atypical moles, and in patients younger than 60, thick melanomas were more commonly found in those with fewer moles but more atypical moles, according to an article published online by JAMA Dermatology.

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Nature
Study explores how high-fat diet influences colon cancer
A study published in Nature reveals how a high-fat diet makes the cells of the intestinal lining more likely to become cancerous. The new study of mice suggests that a high-fat diet drives a population boom of intestinal stem cells and also generates a pool of other cells that behave like stem cells -- that is, they can reproduce themselves indefinitely and differentiate into other cell types. These stem cells and 'stem-like' cells are more likely to give rise to intestinal tumors.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ellison Medical Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital, Kathy and Curt Marble Cancer Research Fund

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-7379
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Genes & Development
Ottawa researchers find Achilles' heel of a severe form of childhood leukemia
Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have found the Achilles' heel of one of the most aggressive forms of leukemia that affects both children and adults. They have also identified a possible new treatment that exploits this fatal weakness.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Fonds de recherche du Québec en Santé, Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation, and others

Contact: Amelia Buchanan, Senior Communication Specialist, Ottawa Hos
ambuchanan@ohri.ca
613-798-5555 x73687
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
The BMJ
Possible link found between radiotherapy for prostate cancer and risk of secondary cancers
Researchers have found a possible association between radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer and an increased risk of developing secondary cancers of the bladder, colorectal tract, and rectum. Their study is published in The BMJ today.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-207-383-6529
BMJ

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Lancet Oncology
New, less toxic therapy for stage-4 breast cancer
For women suffering from stage-4 breast cancer, there is a new treatment plan that, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine clinical trial, is highly effective and has minimal toxicity. The treatment includes a drug recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.
Pfizer

Contact: Kristin Samuelson
kristin.samuelson@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Nature
How diet influences colon cancer
A study ties high-fat diet to changes in intestinal stem cells and may help explain increased cancer risk.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Nature
High-fat diet linked to intestinal stem cell changes, increased risk for cancer
Over the past decade, studies have found that obesity and eating a high-fat, high-calorie diet are significant risk factors for many types of cancer. Now, a new study from Whitehead Institute and MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research reveals how a high-fat diet makes the cells of the intestinal lining more likely to become cancerous.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ellison Medical Foundation, American Federation of Aging Research, Kathy and Curt Marble Cancer Research Fund, V Foundation

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Next-generation immunotherapy offers new hope for beating brain cancer
High-grade glioma is the most aggressive form of brain cancer. Despite improvements in surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, this type of brain tumor is still notoriously hard to treat: less than 10 percent of patients survive beyond five years. Researchers from KU Leuven, Belgium, have now shown that next-generation cell-based immunotherapy may offer new hope in the fight against brain cancer.

Contact: Patrizia Agostinis
Patrizia.Agostinis@med.kuleuven.be
KU Leuven

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
New report finds 'surprising gaps' in knowledge of ovarian cancers
Ovarian cancer should not be categorized as a single disease, but rather as a constellation of different cancers involving the ovary, yet questions remain on how and where various ovarian cancers arise, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Contact: Jennifer Walsh
news@nas.edu
202-334-2138
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Cancer Causes & Control
Processed meat may increase the risk of breast cancer for Latinas, USC study finds
Latinas who eat processed meats such as bacon and sausage may have an increased risk for breast cancer, according to a new study that did not find the same association among white women. Researchers also looked at consumption of red meats, poultry, all fish and just tuna. White women who ate an average of 14 grams of tuna daily (roughly the size of a thimble) were 25 percent more likely to have breast cancer than those who did not.
California Department of Public Health, National Institutes of Health, California Breast Cancer Research Program, American Cancer Society and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Zen Vuong
zvuong@usc.edu
213-300-1381
University of Southern California

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
ACS Central Science
Toward diagnosing diseases such as cancer in their earliest stages
Detecting diseases such as cancer in their earliest stages can make a huge difference in patient treatment, but it is often difficult to do. Now scientists report in the journal ACS Central Science a new, simple method that could make early disease diagnosis much easier. In addition, their approach only requires a minute sample of patient blood and is 1,000 times more sensitive in detecting biomarkers for thyroid cancer than the current government-approved test.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cancer cells' evasive action revealed
Researchers identify a mechanism by which lung cancer cells evade the body's immune system.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Cancer Institute Early Detection Program, Canary Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Translational Research Program and National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Lancet Oncology
Drug combination slows breast cancer spread
A combination of two drugs delays progression of advanced, aggressive breast cancer by an average of nine months -- working in all subsets of the most common type of breast cancer. The combination -- of a first-in-class targeted drug called palbociclib, and the hormone drug fulvestrant -- slowed cancer growth in around two thirds of women with advanced forms of the most common type of breast cancer.
Pfizer

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Psycho-Oncology
Breast cancer: The mental trauma of severe disease
According to a study led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers, a majority of patients diagnosed with breast cancer go on to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and in most of these cases the symptoms persist for at least a year.

Contact: Luise Dirscherl
presse@lmu.de
49-892-180-3423
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1427.

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