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Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1378.

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Public Release: 5-Apr-2016
Stem Cells and Development
What can Frizzled7 reveal about breast cancer development?
A new study shows that Frizzled7, a protein present on human breast epithelial cells and a component of the Wnt signaling pathway is uniquely controlled by the Notch signaling pathway, both of which play key roles in mammary gland formation and breast cancer development. Evidence supporting the potential ability to regulate Notch-mediated Wnt signaling by targeting the NOTCH3-FZD7signaling network is presented in the study published in Stem Cells and Development.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 5-Apr-2016
American Journal of Gastroenterology
Novel 3-D imaging offers new tool for identifying advanced fibrosis in liver
In a paper published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine conducted a prospective study of 100 patients (56 percent women) with biopsy-proven NAFLD to assess the efficacy of two-dimensional magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and a novel 3-D version. They found that both MRE technologies were highly accurate for diagnosing advanced fibrosis, with 3-D perhaps providing additional capabilities in some patients.
Atlantic Philanthropies Inc., John A. Hartford Foundation, Association of Specialty Professors, American Gastroenterological Association, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 5-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Researchers discover that breast cancer tumor growth is dependent on lipid availability
A study headed by the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and in collaboration with hospitals around Spain has unveiled breast cancer dependence on lipids. This discovery could pave the way for new therapeutic strategies to fight the disease.

Contact: Sònia Armengou
armengou@irbbarcelona.org
34-934-037-255
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Public Release: 5-Apr-2016
Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Study shows certain gastrointestinal tumors associated with higher mortality
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have determined that certain gastrointestinal stromal tumors are more deadly than previously reported in medical literature. Findings are published online in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jackie Carr
jcarr@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Lancet Oncology
New immune-stimulating drug, with chemo, shrinks pancreas tumors
The results of an early-stage (phase 1b) clinical trial for pancreatic cancer show that an experimental therapy can control tumors well enough to make some patients eligible for surgery, according to data published in The Lancet Oncology by a Wilmot Cancer Institute investigator.
Washington University/Pfizer Biomedical Collaborative, National Institutes of Health, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

Contact: Leslie Orr
Leslie_Orr@urmc.rochester.edu
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Shorter, intensive radiation can be recommended in early prostate cancer
Giving early-stage prostate cancer patients a slightly higher daily dose of radiation can cut more than two weeks from the current treatment regimen without compromising cancer control, according to a national study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher.
NRG Oncology, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Nature
Aging impacts therapeutic response of melanoma cells
An international team of scientists led by The Wistar Institute have shown that aged tumor cells in melanoma behave differently than younger tumor cells, according to study results published in the journal Nature. Changes in the microenvironment make these older tumor cells more metastatic and more resistant to treatment with targeted therapies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging, The Melanoma Research Foundation, The Harry J. Lloyd Foundation, American Cancer Society

Contact: Ben Leach
bleach@wistar.org
215-495-6800
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Targeting 2 angiogenesis pathways could improve results of glioblastoma treatment
Two companion papers from Massachusetts General Hospital research teams suggest that targeting multiple angiogenesis pathways simultaneously could help overcome the resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment inevitably developed by the devastating brain tumor glioblastoma.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, MedImmune, Roche, National Foundation for Cancer Research

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
Three glycosyltransferases identified as significant mutational targets in colon cancer
In a new study published in Scientific Reports, an online journal of the Nature Publishing Group, scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have successfully characterized the mutational landscapes of glycosylation-associated genes in colon cancer, identifying three glycosyltransferases as significant mutational targets in CRC.
United States Public Health Service

Contact: Marc Kaplan
marc.kaplan@case.edu
216-368-4692
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
2016 Experimental Biology
Cancer research at Marshall University shows promise for combating deadly lung cancer
A study by researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has found that blocking the blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help reduce their growth and delay the regrowth process after treatment. Small cell lung cancer is considered the most lethal of all lung cancers.
Young Clinical Scientist Award from the Flight Attendant Medical Association, Research Starter Grant from the PhRMA Foundation, ASPET-Astellas Award, ACTSI Grant from Marshall University, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leah Payne
edwardl@marshall.edu
304-691-1713
Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
ecancermedicalscience
Choir singing boosts immune system activity in cancer patients and carers, study shows
Singing in a choir for just one hour boosts levels of immune proteins in people affected by cancer, reduces stress and improves mood, which in turn could have a positive impact on overall health, a new study by Tenovus Cancer Care and the Royal College of Music published today in ecancermedicalscience has found.

Contact: Audrey Nailor
audrey@ecancer.org
117-403-3093
ecancermedicalscience

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Cell Cycle
A chink in the armor of breast cancer cells
Working with human breast cancer cells, a team of scientists from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have successfully turned off a misbehaving protein that fuels the growth of a particularly aggressive, drug-resistant form of the disease known as triple-negative breast cancer. In a set of lab experiments, the team managed to neutralize the protein, called Nodal, a growth factor already known for its role in early embryonic development.
National Institutes of Health, Northwestern Memorial Foundation Dixon Translational Research Grant, Brinson Foundation

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epesheva@luriechildrens.org
321-227-4767
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Precision medicine brings new hope to those with advanced urothelial cancer
Five of six patients with advanced metastatic urothelial cancer and one of two specific genetic abnormalities responded to treatment with afatinib, approved in 2013 for lung cancer. One patient with both mutations had stable disease for 16 months. None of the other 17 patients had a significant response. Time to disease progression with afatinib was much longer for patients carrying certain genetic abnormalities.
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., University of Chicago Cancer Center Auxiliary Board

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tandem duplicate phenotype detected in triple-negative breast, other cancers
A genomic configuration described as a tandem duplicator phenotype is significantly enriched in triple-negative breast cancer, serous ovarian cancer and endometrial carcinomas, and responds to cisplatin chemotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Apr-2016
ENDO 2016
Radioactive iodine treatment in women affects ovarian reserve and may affect fertility
Women of reproductive age who have thyroid cancer should be cautious about receiving radioactive iodine treatment, which affects their remaining egg supply -- their ovarian reserve -- and may affect their fertility, new research from Israel finds. The results of this ongoing study will be presented Saturday, April 2, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston.
The Institute of Endocrinology, Racine IVF Unit at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Contact: Jenni Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 2-Apr-2016
ENDO 2016
Engineered ovary implant restores fertility in mice
Northwestern University scientists created a prosthetic ovary using a 3-D printer -- an implant that allowed mice that had their ovaries surgically removed to bear live young. The results will be presented Saturday, April 2, at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, ENDO 2016, in Boston.
National Institutes of Health, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jenni Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 2-Apr-2016
ENDO 2016
Study investigates light, biological clocks, estrogen receptor expression in the breast
Researchers are exploring one possible physiologic explanation of why prior studies have demonstrated a higher risk of breast cancer in women who experience high levels of illumination at night. Their study results in an animal model will be presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston.

Contact: Jenni Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
More Latinas screened for breast cancer after 'Promotora' visits
Latina women were nearly twice as likely to be screened for breast cancer after they were visited in their homes by trained community health workers, known as Promotoras, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Navneet Miller
navneet.miller@creation.io
415-262-5972
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
New study links coffee consumption to decreased risk of colorectal cancer
Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center of Keck Medicine of USC have found that coffee consumption, including decaf, instant and espresso, decreases the risk of colorectal cancer. Moreover, these benefits increase the more coffee you drink.

Contact: Mary Dacuma
mary.dacuma@med.usc.edu
323-865-7839
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
ENDO 2016
Engineered ovary implant restores fertility in mice
Northwestern University scientists created a prosthetic ovary using a 3-D printer -- an implant that allowed mice that had their ovaries surgically removed to bear live young. The results will be presented Saturday, April 2, at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, ENDO 2016, in Boston.
National Institutes of Health, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
Journal of Leukocyte Biology
Vaccine adjuvant protects against post-burn infection
Research findings published in the April 2016 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggests that the use of a FDA-approved drug may serve a dual purpose by protecting people who are at high risk of infection, including those with severe burns, cancer, and other conditions that may compromise their immune systems' ability to ward off disease.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology
NYU Tandon researcher synthesizes hybrid molecule that delivers a blow to malignant cells
A new molecule developed at NYU Tandon School of Engineering shows promise for treating breast cancer. The protein/polymer-gold nanoparticle composite, besides being easy to synthesize, can load up with drugs, carry them to malignant cells, and unload them where they can do the most damage with the least amount of harm to the patient. It was developed by Jin Kim Montclare, an associate professor in Tandon's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.
National Science Foundation, Shiffrin Meyer Breast Cancer Discovery Fund, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Karl Greenberg
karl.greenberg@nyu.edu
646-519-1996
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
Genes & Development
Seeing cell to cell differences for first time explains symptoms of rare genetic disorders
Every cell in the body has two genomes, one from the mother and one from the father. Until now, researchers have lacked the tools to examine -- in a single cell -the exact readout from each genome to make RNA. Using a new technology that allows researchers to do just that, an interdisciplinary team examined a rare disease in which these two genomes are expressed differently throughout the body, even sometimes in the same organ.
National Institutes of Health, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation, St. Baldrick's Foundation, Burroughs-Wellcome Fund, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
ENDO 2016
BPA changes fetal development of the mammary gland, can raise breast cancer risk
A new culture system that tests the role of chemical exposure on the developing mammary gland has found that bisphenol A (BPA) directly affects the mammary gland of mouse embryos. The study results, to be presented Friday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston, show that these changes to embryonic mammary tissue occur at a dose comparable to that of humans' environmental exposure to BPA.

Contact: Jenni Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 31-Mar-2016
Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology
Helping young adult cancer survivors adopt a healthy lifestyle
A healthy lifestyle is especially important for young adult and teenage survivors of cancer, and how health behavior messages related to diet, exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption are developed and presented may impact their effectiveness in this population, according to an article in Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (JAYAO).

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1378.

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