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Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Study defines clinical trials likely to exclude patients with brain metastases
A CU Cancer Center study being presented at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer defines characteristics of cancer clinical trials that are likely to exclude patients with brain metastases.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
Journal of Physical Chemistry B
How the 'heat' compound from chili peppers could help kill cancer cells
Capsaicin, the compound responsible for chilis' heat, is used in creams sold to relieve pain, and recent research shows that in high doses, it kills prostate cancer cells. Now researchers are finding clues that help explain how the substance works. Their conclusions suggest that one day it could come in a new, therapeutic form. Their study appears in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
Nearly half of testicular cancer risk comes from inherited genetic faults
Almost half of the risk of developing testicular cancer comes from the DNA passed down from our parents, a new study reports. The research suggests genetic inheritance is much more important in testicular cancer than in most other cancer types, where genetics typically accounts for less than 20 percent of risk.
Movember Foundation, Institute of Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
44-207-153-5582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Clinical trial using immunotherapy drug combinations to treat lung cancer appears safe
Pembrolizumab, an immunotherapy drug that unmasks cancer cells and allows the body's immune system to destroy tumors, appears to be safe in treating lung cancers, according to a study by Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center. Dr. Glen Weiss is the first author of the study abstract: Phase Ib/II Study of Pembrolizumab plus Chemotherapy in Advanced Cancer: Results of lung cancer patients receiving (at least) one prior line of therapy.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Penn team: Sustained remission of multiple myeloma after personalized cellular therapy
A multiple myeloma patient whose cancer had stopped responding after nine different treatment regimens experienced a complete remission after receiving an investigational personalized cellular therapy known as CTL019 developed by a team at the University of Pennsylvania. The investigational treatment was combined with chemotherapy and an autologous stem cell transplant -- a new strategy designed to target and kill the cells that give rise to myeloma cells.
Novartis, National Institutes of Health, Conquer Cancer Foundation

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 9-Sep-2015
PLOS ONE
A hint of increased brain tumor risk -- 5 years before diagnosis
A new study suggests that changes in immune function can occur as long as five years before the diagnosis of a brain tumor that typically produces symptoms only three months before it is detected.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center

Contact: Judith Schwartzbaum
ja.schwartzbaum@gmail.com
Ohio State University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
CTCA study shows characterization of lung micro-organisms could help lung cancer patients
A study of microbes that inhabit human lungs and how they may relate to the development of lung cancer, led by Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center in Goodyear, Arizona, was presented today in Denver during the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer. Dr. Glen Weiss, Director of Clinical Research and Medical Oncologist at CTCA at Western presented the study at today's WCLC poster session on Biology, Pathology and Molecular Testing.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Angewandte Chemie
Researchers find new clue to halting leukemia relapse
Rice researchers identify and validate a new molecular mechanism of action to overcome drug resistance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
National Institutes of Health, Robert A. Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, Virginia and L.E. Simmons Family Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
JAMA Pediatrics
E-cigarettes serve as smoking gateway for teens and young adults, Pitt-Dartmouth study finds
Young people across the United States who smoke electronic cigarettes are considerably more likely to start smoking traditional cigarettes within a year than their peers who do not smoke e-cigarettes, according to an analysis led by the University of Pittsburgh Center for Research on Media, Technology, and Health and the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Health Affairs
Global health studies in September Health Affairs
The September issue of Health Affairs includes articles examining the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases, both in the United States and elsewhere.

Contact: Amy Martin Vogt
amartinvogt@gymr.com
202-745-5052
Health Affairs

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Thyroid
Increased detection of low-risk tumors driving up thyroid cancer rates, Mayo study finds
Low-risk cancers that do not have any symptoms and presumably will not cause problems in the future are responsible for the rapid increase in the number of new cases of thyroid cancer diagnosed over the past decade, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in the journal Thyroid. According to the study authors, nearly one-third of these recent cases were diagnosed when clinicians used high-tech imaging even when no symptoms of thyroid disease were present.

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Scientific Reports
Nature: Study creates cell immunity to parasite that infects 50 million
Multi-institution, multidisciplinary study applies cancer science technique to field of infectious diseases to pinpoint human genes that allow parasite E. histolytica to cause cell death.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
American Journal of Pathology
Biomarker helps predict survival time in gastric cancer patients
Gastric cancer poses a significant health problem in developing countries and is typically associated with late-stage diagnosis and high mortality. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology points to a pivotal role played by the biomarker microRNA (miR)-506 in gastric cancer. Patients whose primary gastric cancer lesions express high levels of miR-506 have significantly longer survival times compared to patients with low miR-506 expression. In addition, miR-506 suppresses tumor growth, blood vessel formation, and metastasis.
National Natural Science Foundation of China, Scientific Research Project of the Department of Education of Yunnan Province, Leading Talent of Health Systems of Yunnan Province

Contact: Eileen Leahy
ajpmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
New guidelines address long-term needs of colorectal cancer survivors
New American Cancer Society Cancer Survivorship Care guidelines released today provide primary care clinicians with recommendations for providing comprehensive care to the estimated 1.2 million survivors of colorectal cancer in the United States.

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Pharmacology Research & Perspectives
New drug-like compounds may improve odds of men battling prostate cancer, researchers find
Researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, have discovered new drug-like compounds that could ultimately be developed into medicines that offer better odds of survival to prostate cancer patients. The new compounds target the human protein P-gp, which causes resistance against a majority of the drugs currently available for treating cancer and HIV/AIDS. The new compounds, discovered via computer-generated models, are good candidates for development into drugs since the compounds have low toxicity to noncancerous cells.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Communities Foundation of Texas, Southern Methodist University

Contact: Margaret Allen
mallen@smu.edu
214-768-7664
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Biochemistry
Drugs behave as predicted in computer model of key protein, enabling cancer drug discovery
Drugs behaved as predicted in a computer-generated model of the key protein, P-glycoprotein, say researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The model allows pharmacological researchers to dock nearly any drug and see how it behaves in P-gp, a cellular protein linked to failure of chemotherapy. A dynamic mechanism that overcomes reliance on static images of P-gp's structure, the new model provides hope for finding drug-like compounds that inhibit P-gp from pumping out chemotherapeutic drugs.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Communities Foundation of Texas, SMU University Research Council, SMU Dedman College Dean's Research Council, SMU Dedman College Center for Drug Discovery

Contact: Margaret Allen
mallen@smu.edu
214-768-7664
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Epilepsia
Many childhood brain tumor survivors experience seizures
New research reveals that seizures are frequent in childhood brain tumor survivors.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
Stem Cell Reports
Researchers develop a method for controlling gene activation
University of Helsinki researchers have developed a new method which enables the activation of genes in a cell without changing the genome. Applications of the method include directing the differentiation of stem cells. The research was published in the Stem Cell Reports journal.

Contact: Timo Otonkoski
timo.otonkoski@helsinki.fi
358-504-486-392
University of Helsinki

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Personalized medicine's success needs accurate classification of tumors
If cancer patients are to receive optimal treatment, clinicians must have an accurate histologic classification of the tumor and know its genetic characteristics, said William D. Travis, M.D., attending thoracic pathologist, Department of Pathology, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Travis made his remarks today at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
Jeff.Wolf@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Study defines criteria for MET-driven lung cancer suitable for crizotinib treatment
CU Cancer Center study presented at 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer defines criteria for MET-amplified cancer likely sensitive to treatment with crizotinib.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO
Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
Physicians highlight ENT research to be presented during otolaryngology's annual meeting
Abstracts of research to be presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO? of the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation are now available.

Contact: Lindsey Walter
newsroom@entnet.org
703-535-3762
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Public Release: 8-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Advanced treatment and prognosis data available for TNM classification
The publication of the 8th edition of the 'Tumor, Node and Metastasis Classification of Lung Cancer' will provide physicians around the world access to new data to more precisely stage and treat cases of lung cancer. That data, collected by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee and presented at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer, will be published in 2016.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
Jeff.Wolf@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 7-Sep-2015
Rare melanoma carries unprecedented burden of mutations
A rare, deadly form of skin cancer known as desmoplasmic melanoma may possess the highest burden of gene mutations of any cancer.

Contact: Nicholas Weiler
nicholas.weiler@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 7-Sep-2015
16th World Conference on Lung Cancer
IASLC issues new statement on tobacco control and smoking cessation
The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer today issued a new statement on Tobacco Control and Smoking Cessation at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Denver. The statement calls for higher taxes on tobacco products, comprehensive advertising and promotion bans of all tobacco products and product regulation including pack warnings.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
Jeff.Wolf@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 7-Sep-2015
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Dangerous bacterial enzymes become important tools for protein chemistry
A research group at Umeå University, together with researchers in Munich, have identified two enzymes from the pathogenic Legionella bacteria that are very useful in chemically modifying proteins for them to be used in medical drugs. The result of the study is presented in the chemical journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

Contact: Ingrid Söderbergh
ingrid.soderbergh@umu.se
46-907-866-024
Umea University

Showing releases 1101-1125 out of 1282.

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