IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1281.

<< < 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 > >>

Public Release: 7-Sep-2015
Nature
Study shows common molecular tool kit shared by organisms across the tree of life
Researchers have discovered the assembly instructions for nearly 1,000 protein complexes shared by most kinds of animals, revealing their deep evolutionary relationships. Those instructions offer a powerful new tool for studying the causes of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and cancer.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Welch Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and others

Contact: Chris Cervini
ccervini@utexas.edu
505-980-6110
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 4-Sep-2015
Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Esophageal cancer: Positron emission tomography does not improve treatment
Increasingly positron emission tomography is being used to monitor the size of the tumor during the radiological treatment of esophageal cancer. To date, however, no benefit for patients has ensued, as Milly Schröer-Günther and co-authors show in an original article in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. http://www.aerzteblatt.de/pdf.asp?id=171654

Contact: Dr. rer. medic. Milly Schröer-Günther
milly.schroeer-guenther@iqwig.de
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Molecular Cell
Team decodes structure of protein complex active in DNA repair
The multifunctional ubiquitin tweaks the activity of newly made proteins, which can influence DNA damage repair via BRCA1 and anti-inflammatory responses. One enzyme in particular, BRCC36, removes a specific type of ubiquitin central to DNA damage repair and inflammation. But BRCC36 doesn't act on its own. It's part of a complex with KIAA0157. How these two work together is finally coming into focus.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Harrington Discovery Institute Scholar-Innovator Award, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Basser Center for BRCA, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
JAMA Oncology
Study finds increased risk of MGUS in Vietnam Vets exposed to Agent Orange
A study that used stored blood samples from US Air Force personnel who conducted aerial herbicide spray missions of Agent Orange during the Vietnam war found a more than two-fold increased risk of the precursor to multiple myeloma known as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Rebecca Williams
williamr@mskcc.org
646-227-3318
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
American Journal of Transplantation
Drug for fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for cancer, death
Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UCSF researchers.

Contact: Scott Maier
scott.maier@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Cell
Aspirin could hold the key to supercharged cancer immunotherapy
Giving cancer patients aspirin at the same time as immunotherapy could dramatically boost the effectiveness of the treatment, according to new research published in the journal Cell.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Greg Jones
greg.jones@cancer.org.uk
44-203-469-8311
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Acupuncture reduces hot flashes in breast cancer survivors
Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes as a result of estrogen-targeting therapies to treat breast cancer, according to a new study. Hot flashes are particularly severe and frequent in breast cancer survivors, but current FDA-approved remedies for these unpleasant episodes, such as hormone replacement therapies are off-limits to breast cancer survivors because they include estrogen. The results of the study are published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Nature Communications
Targeting newly discovered pathway sensitizes tumors to radiation and chemotherapy
In some patients, aggressive cancers can become resistant to chemotherapy and radiation treatments. In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified a pathway that causes the resistance and a new therapeutic drug that targets this pathway.
National Institutes of Health, California Breast Cancer Research Foundation IDEA Award and ACS IRG

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Science
New role for an old protein: Cancer causer
A protein known to play a role in transporting the molecular contents of normal cells into and out of various intracellular compartments can also turn such cells cancerous by stimulating a key growth-control pathway.
National Institutes of Health, Starr Cancer Consortium Award, US Department of Defense

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 3-Sep-2015
Nature
Variations in cell programs control cancer and normal stem cells
In the breast, cancer stem cells and normal stem cells can arise from different cell types and tap into distinct yet related stem cell programs, according to Whitehead Institute researchers. The differences between these stem cell programs may be significant enough to be exploited by future therapeutics.
National Research Foundation, Singapore, American Cancer Society, Ludwig Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, National Cancer Institute Program, Samuel Waxman Cancer Research

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Nature
Disruption of a crucial cellular machine may kill the engine of deadly cancers
In a way, cancer resembles a runaway car with a gas pedal stuck to the floor, hurling out of control. Most new targeted cancer therapies seek to fix the gas pedal itself, and thus thwart the aggressive behavior of the tumor. But for many types of cancers, the pedal simply cannot be repaired, so new alternatives are desperately needed. A team at Baylor College of Medicine has discovered a way to step on the brakes of some of the deadliest cancers.

Contact: Glenna Vickers
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Nature
Mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein uses epigenetics to drive aggressive cancer growth
Aggressive cancer growth and alterations in gene activity without changes in DNA sequence (epigenetics) are associated with mutant p53 proteins, which has implications for such difficult-to-treat cancers as those in the pancreas and breast.
National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Penn researchers report long-term remissions in first personalized cell therapy trial
Eight of 14 patients in the first trial of the University of Pennsylvania's personalized cellular therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) responded to the therapy, with some complete remissions continuing past four and a half years.
Novartis, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
JAMA Surgery
Prophylactic surgery nearly doubles in men with breast cancer
The number of men with breast cancer who undergo surgery to remove the unaffected breast has risen sharply. The report is the first to identify the trend, which mirrors a trend seen in US women over the past two decades.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Science Signaling
New genetic mutation identified in melanoma cancer cells
There is strong evidence that the protein complex APC/C may function as a tumor suppressor in multiple cancers including lymphoma, colorectal and breast cancer, and now melanoma. A new study has revealed that a genetic mutation leading to repression of a specific protein, Cdh1, which interacts with APC/C, is present in melanoma cancer cells.
National Institutes for Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kristen Perfetuo
kristenp@bu.edu
617-638-8484
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
eLife
Cellular recycling complexes may hold key to chemotherapy resistance
Upsetting the balance between protein synthesis, misfolding, and degradation drives cancer and neurodegeneration. Recent cancer treatments take advantage of this knowledge with a class of drugs that block protein degradation, known as proteasome inhibitors. Widespread resistance to these drugs limits their success, but Whitehead researchers have discovered a potential Achilles heel in resistance. With such understandings researchers may be able to target malignancy broadly, and more effectively.
EMBO, Charles A. King Trust, Koch Institute Frontier Research Program, Kathy and Curt Marble Cancer Research Fund, Alexander and Margaret Stewart Trust, National Institutes of Health, Valvano Foundation

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Cancer
Men in China face increasing tobacco-related cancer risks
In China, smoking now causes nearly a quarter of all cancers in adult males.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Journal of Hepatology
WSU scientists discover mechanism for air pollution-induced liver disease
A research team led by Kezhong Zhang, Ph.D., at the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, has discovered that exposure to air pollution has a direct adverse health effect on the liver and causes liver fibrosis, an illness associated with metabolic disease and liver cancer.
NIH/National Environmental Health Science Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, American Heart Association

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Telomerase targeting drug demonstrates benefit in myelofibrosis treatment
Imetelstat, a novel drug that targets telomerase, has demonstrated potential value in treating patients with myelofibrosis, according to the results of a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Geron Corporation

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Cancer Research
Newly engineered CAR T cells can better discriminate between cancer and normal cells
A new development in engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, called affinity tuning, can make the CAR T cells spare normal cells and better recognize and attack cancer cells, which may help lower the toxicity associated with this type of immunotherapy when used against solid tumors, according to a preclinical study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
215-446-6896
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
JAMA
Incorporating genomic sequencing, counseling into pediatric cancer treatment shows benefit
In a study that included children and young adults with relapsed or refractory cancer, incorporation of integrative clinical genomic sequencing data into clinical management was feasible, revealed potentially actionable findings in nearly half of the patients, and was associated with change in treatment and family genetics counseling for a small proportion of patients, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Cancer Research
Modified CAR T cells can preferentially target cancer cells and spare normal cells
Engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to lower their affinity for the protein epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) made the cells preferentially recognize and eliminate tumor cells that have high amounts of EGFR while sparing normal cells that have lower amounts of the protein, according to a preclinical study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
215-446-6896
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
Journal of Human Genetics
Design of 'Japonica Array'
A research group at Tohoku University Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization has successfully developed the Japonica Array which is the first ever SNP array optimized for Japanese population. The aim of development of Japonica Array is not only to facilitate the prospective genomic cohort study conducted by ToMMo but also to make a contribution to the genomic medicine studies.
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) and Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development

Contact: Fuji Nagami
f-nagami@med.tohoku.ac.jp
81-227-177-908
Tohoku University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
eLife
Yeast study yields insights into cell-division cycle
Studies using yeast genetics have provided new, fundamental insights into the cell-division cycle, researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute report.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ian Demsky
idemsky@umich.edu
734-647-9837
University of Michigan

Public Release: 1-Sep-2015
FASEB Journal
New treatment strategy identified for tumors associated with diabetes
If you have diabetes and cancer, here's some hope. In a new research report appearing in the Sept. 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists reveal a newly discovered tissue- and organ-specific mechanism that regulates blood vessel growth, and when inhibited reduced the growth of tumors in diabetic mice.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1281.

<< < 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

Featured Multimedia

 

EurekAlert!