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Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1245.

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Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
Lung cancer study hints at new treatments
Studying the most common type of lung cancer, researchers have uncovered mutations in a cell-signaling pathway that plays a role in forming tumors. The new knowledge may expand treatments for patients because drugs targeting some of these genetic changes already are available or are in clinical trials.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
Study identifies novel genomic changes in the most common type of lung cancer
Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Press Office
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Sunshine vitamin ups bowel cancer survival odds, study finds
Bowel cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a University of Edinburgh study shows.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Jen Middleton
jen.middleton@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6514
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
Wake-up call for more research into cell metabolism
More scientific research into the metabolism of stromal support cells and immune cells -- and the role of the metabolism of these cell types in the development of diseases -- could open new therapeutic avenues for diabetes, inflammatory conditions and cancer. That was the conclusion of a review article by scientists from VIB and KU Leuven in the leading journal Nature.

Contact: Peter Carmeleit
peter.carmeliet@vib-kuleuven.be
32-163-73204
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Signal may send cancer's cellular factories into overdrive
A network of signals active in almost all types of cancer sends the protein factories in our cells into overdrive, and may help fuel a tumor's uncontrolled growth, new research suggests.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Graham Shaw
graham.shaw@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35380
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Dermatology Online Journal
Study of dermatology on YouTube shows new ways science reaches public
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the Dermatology Online Journal shows that YouTube also allows researchers, journals, and health advocates to connect directly with the public on topics of skin cancer and prevention.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Variations in key gene predict cancer patients' risk for radiation-induced toxicity
Key genetic variants may affect how cancer patients respond to radiation treatments, according to a study published this week in Nature Genetics.

Contact: David Slotnick
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Archives of Toxicology
Low doses of arsenic cause cancer in male mice
Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Brain tumor invasion along blood vessels may lead to new cancer treatments
Invading glioblastoma cells may hijack cerebral blood vessels during early stages of disease progression and damage the brain's protective barrier, a study in mice indicates. This finding could ultimately lead to new ways to bring about the death of the tumor, as therapies may be able to reach these deadly cells at an earlier time point than was previously thought possible.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
International Union of Crystallography Journal
A possible pathway for inhibiting liver and colon cancer is found
A group of scientists from Spain, the UK and the United States has revealed the structure of a protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers.
National Institutes of Health, Plan Nacional of I+D, Diputación de Vizcaya

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nursing Research
Harmful hookahs: Many young smokers aren't aware of the danger
Despite warnings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that hookah smoking can be just as dangerous as cigarettes, many young adults believe that using the water pipes is not harmful to their health, according to a UCLA School of Nursing study.

Contact: Laura Perry
lperry@sonnet.ucla.edu
310-794-4022
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
PLOS Medicine
NCI study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years
Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three countries.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NCI Press Officers
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nature
Gene mutation may lead to treatment for liver cancer
Two genetic mutations in liver cells may drive tumor formation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Lancet Oncology
Concern at lack of teenage patients in cancer trials
Age limits on clinical trials need to be more flexible to allow more teenage cancer patients the chance to access new treatments, according to a report from the National Cancer Research Institute, published in the Lancet Oncology.
National Cancer Research Institute

Contact: Alan Worsley
Alan.Worsley@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98300
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Nature Methods
DNA origami nano-tool provides important clue to cancer
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have headed a study that provides new knowledge about the EphA2 receptor, which is significant in several forms of cancer. This is important knowledge in itself -- but just as important is how this study, which is published in the highly respected journal Nature Methods, was conducted.
Swedish Research Council, VINNOVA, and others

Contact: Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-852-486-077
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Blocking cells' movement to stop the spread of cancer
Insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumours, finds according to new UCL research.
Medical Research Council, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Uehara Memorial Foundation, Asahi Glass Foundation, Royal Society & Wellcome Trust

Contact: Dr Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Journal of Men's Health
Does cycling increase risk for erectile dysfunction, infertility, or prostate cancer?
Cycling is a popular activity that offers clear health benefits, but there is an ongoing controversy about whether men who ride have a higher risk of urogenital disorders such as erectile dysfunction, infertility, or prostate cancer.

Contact: Kathryn Ruehle
kruehle@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Pseudogenes may provide clearer understanding of biomarkers
The results indicated that the science of pseudogene expression analysis may very well play a key role in explaining how cancer occurs by helping medical experts in the discovery of new biomarkers. The study's findings appear in today's issue of Nature Communications.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Oncology Nursing Forum
Support team aiding caregivers of cancer patients shows success, CWRU researchers report
Many caregivers of terminal cancer patients suffer depression and report regret and guilt from feeling they could have done more to eliminate side effects and relieve the pain. So researchers from the nursing school at Case Western Reserve University devised and tested an intervention that quickly integrates a cancer support team to guide caregivers and their patients through difficult end-of-life treatment and decisions.
NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UGA researchers use nanoparticles to enhance chemotherapy
University of Georgia researchers have developed a new formulation of cisplatin, a common chemotherapy drug, that significantly increases the drug's ability to target and destroy cancerous cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Shanta Dhar
shanta@uga.edu
706-542-1012
University of Georgia

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
Infant toenails reveal in utero exposure to low-level arsenic, Dartmouth study finds
Infant toenails are a reliable way to estimate arsenic exposure before birth, a Dartmouth College study shows.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study shows restored immunity for cancer-related fungal infections
A study at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center used the Sleeping Beauty gene transfer system to modify T cells in hopes of fighting major life-threatening infections caused by invasive Aspergillus fungus.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
AAPA Conference 2014
GVSU researchers find moral beliefs barrier to HPV vaccine
A survey of first-year Grand Valley State University students showed the biggest barrier to receiving a Human Papillomavirus vaccine was moral or religious beliefs.

Contact: Michele Coffill
coffillm@gvsu.edu
616-331-2221
Grand Valley State University

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
First cancer immunotherapy for dogs developed
Nearly every second dog develops cancer from the age of 10 years onward. A specific form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not been available for animals so far. Scientists at the Messerli Research Institute of the Vetmeduni Vienna, the Medical University, and the University of Vienna have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs. The scientists published their research data in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics.

Contact: Erika Jensen-Jarolim
erika.jensen-jarolim@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-120-577-2660
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists find important piece in the brain tumor puzzle
Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University and McGill University Health Centre have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO -- small ubiquitin-like modifier -- is a key to why tumor cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma.

Contact: Anita Kar
anita.kar@mcgill.ca
514-398-3376
McGill University

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1245.

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