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Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1259.

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Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Cell Biology
Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance
Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a molecule, or biomarker, called CD61 on the surface of drug-resistant tumors that appears responsible for inducing tumor metastasis by enhancing the stem cell-like properties of cancer cells.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Yadira Galindo
ygalindo@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Michelle Potter
mpotter8@jhmi.edu
410-614-2914
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer
The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New pain relief targets discovered
Scientists have identified new pain relief targets that could be used to provide relief from chemotherapy-induced pain. BBSRC-funded researchers at King's College London made the discovery when researching how pain occurs in nerves in the periphery of the body.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Chris Melvin
chris.melvin@bbsrc.ac.uk
01-793-414-694
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
First genetic link discovered to difficult-to-diagnose breast cancer sub-type
The discovery of the genetic variant, in conjunction with other markers, could help in the development of future genetic screening tools to assess women's risk of developing invasive lobular cancer, and also gives researchers important new clues about the genetic causes of the disease and a related precursor to cancer called lobular carcinoma in situ.

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
44-207-153-5582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Developmental Cell
Dual role: Key cell division proteins also power up mitochondria
An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process.
DOE Office of Science, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dorsey Griffith
dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
New gene variant found increases the risk of colorectal cancer from eating processed meat
A common genetic variant that affects one in three people appears to significantly increase the risk of colorectal cancer from the consumption of processed meat, according to study published today in PLOS Genetics.

Contact: Jane C. Figueiredo
janefigu@usc.edu
PLOS

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
European Journal of Oncology Nursing
Unraveling the 'black ribbon' around lung cancer
A Michigan State University study consisting of lung cancer patients, primarily smokers between the ages of 51 to 79 years old, is shedding more light on the stigma often felt by these patients, the emotional toll it can have and how health providers can help.
Michigan State University College of Nursing

Contact: Sarina Gleason
sarina.gleason@cabs.msu.edu
517-355-9742
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print table of contents for April 17, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, April 17, 2014 in the JCI: 'Double-stapled peptide inhibits RSV infection,' 'Fibroblast-derived exosomes mediate caridiomyocyte hypertrophy via microRNA delivery,' 'Patient response to cryptococcosis is dependent on fungal-specific factors,' 'The coinhibitory receptor PD-1H suppresses T cell responses,' 'Type-1 angiotensin receptors on macrophages ameliorate IL-1 receptor-mediated kidney fibrosis,' and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
919-265-3506
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
ACS Synthetic Biology
Building 'smart' cell-based therapies
Northwestern University synthetic biologist Joshua Leonard and his team have developed a technology for engineering human cells as therapies that become activated only in diseased tissues.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of American College of Surgeons
20 years of data shows treatment technique improvement for advanced abdominal cancer
Wake Forest Baptist has the largest reported, single-center experience with cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC and analysis of 20 years' worth of patient data shows that outcomes have clearly improved for patients undergoing this treatment technique.

Contact: Bonnie Davis
bdavis@wakehealth.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors
The most 'feminine' girls and 'masculine' boys -- are more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health researchers. The most feminine teenage girls use tanning beds more frequently and are more likely to be physically inactive, while the most masculine teenage boys are more likely to chew tobacco and smoke cigars compared with gender-nonconforming peers.
National Institutes of Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, Leadership Education in Adolescent Health Project

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Celldex's Phase 1 study of CDX-1401 published in Science Translational Medicine
Celldex Therapeutics Inc. announced today that final data from its Phase 1 study of CDX-1401 in solid tumors, including long-term patient follow-up, have been published in Science Translational Medicine. The data demonstrate robust antibody and T cell responses and evidence of clinical benefit in patients with very advanced cancers and suggest that CDX-1401 may predispose patients to better outcomes on subsequent therapy with checkpoint inhibitors.

Contact: Sarah Cavanaugh
scavanaugh@celldex.com
508-864-8337
Celldex Therapeutics

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Cancer Causes & Control
Body Mass Index associated with breast cancer, regardless of body shape
A study of predominantly white women finds a larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
HIV+ women respond well to HPV vaccine
A three-nation clinical trial found that a vaccine can safely help the vast majority of HIV-positive women produce antibodies against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus, even if their immune system is weak and even if they've had some prior HPV exposure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Genome Research
Research uncovers DNA looping damage tied to HPV cancer
Certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) are known to cause about five percent of all cancer cases, yet all the mechanisms aren't completely understood. Now, researchers, led by The Ohio State University's David Symer, M.D., Ph.D., have leveraged Ohio Supercomputer Center resources and whole-genome sequencing to identify a new way that HPV might spark cancer development -- by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when HPV is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.
NIH/National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research

Contact: Mr. Jamie Abel
jabel@oh-tech.org
614-292-6495
Ohio Supercomputer Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Medical Oncology
Radiation therapy for cervical cancer increases risk for colorectal cancer
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are the first to recommend that young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended. The UTMB researchers, finding a high incidence of secondary colorectal cancers among cervical cancer survivors treated with radiation, offer new recommendations that the younger women in this group begin colorectal cancer screening about eight years after their initial cervical cancer diagnosis.
Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Molly Dannenmaier
mjdannen@utmb.edu
409-772-8790
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Targeting cancer with a triple threat
MIT chemists design nanoparticles that can deliver three cancer drugs at a time.
Royal Society of Chemistry, Ovarian Cancer Teal Innovator Award, National Institutes of Health, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canad, Koch Institute Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Cancer Research
Blood test spots recurrent breast cancers and monitors response to treatment
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment.
Avon, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Cancer Research
Unexpected protein partnership has implications for cancer treatment
Scientists have identified two unlikely partners, in a type of immune cell called a macrophage, that work together, in response to cancer drugs, to increase inflammation in a way that may alter tumor growth. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health published the study in the journal Cancer Research.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Joe Balintfy
balintfyj@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-1993
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
European Journal of Cancer
Can refined categorization improve prediction of patient survival in RECIST 1.1?
In a recent analysis by the RECIST Working Group published in the European Journal of Cancer, EORTC researchers had explored whether a more refined categorization of tumor response or various aspects of progression could improve prediction of overall survival in the RECIST database. They found that modeling target lesion tumor growth did not improve the prediction of overall survival above and beyond that of the other components of progression.
European Organisation for Research and Treatment Charitable Trust

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology
UT Arlington physicist creates new nanoparticle for cancer therapy
In a newly published paper, a University of Texas at Arlington physicist describes a newly created complex that may make photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment more efficient and cost effective and effective against deep tissue cancers.
Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Study links severe sleep apnea to increased risk of stroke, cancer and death
A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death.
Australian National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
630-737-9700
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Nano shake-up
Researchers in the University of Delaware Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have shown that routine procedures in handling and processing can have a significant influence on the size, shape and delivery of drug nano carriers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Cancer
Shared decision making during radiation therapy improves patient satisfaction
Playing an active role in their radiation treatment decisions leaves cancer patients feeling more satisfied with their care, and may even relieve psychological distress around the experience, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report in the journal Cancer.
Penn Integrative Oncology Fund

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1259.

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