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Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1338.

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Public Release: 30-Dec-2015
Theranostics
New method for better treatment of breast cancer
A new study shows that a novel imaging-based method for defining appropriateness of breast cancer treatment is as accurate as the current standard-of-care and could reduce the need for invasive tissue sampling. The results suggest that the method might lead to more optimal treatment of individual patients.

Contact: Jens Sörensen
jens.sorensen@pet.uu.se
46-705-183-600
Uppsala University

Public Release: 30-Dec-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Virtual colonoscopy an alternative to FOB test & colonoscopy for colorectal cancer?
Colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer in the world, with population screening being recommended for early disease detection, however, the most optimal method to screen for the disease remains unknown.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Factors predicting low patient accrual in cancer clinical trials
Nearly one in four publicly sponsored cancer clinical trials fail to enroll enough participants to draw valid conclusions about treatments or techniques. Such trials represent a waste of scarce human and economic resources and contribute little to medical knowledge.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
JAMA Oncology
New breast cancer drug may be effective against other types of cancer
Palbociclib, a new oral drug whose efficacy in combating breast cancer has been demonstrated alone and in combination with endocrine therapy, also has potential to combat other types of cancer, according to a literature review and additional original research conducted by experts at the Abramson Cancer Center in the University of Pennsylvania published this month in JAMA Oncology.
Pfizer Inc., National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Second contagious form of cancer found in Tasmanian devils
Transmissible cancers are believed to arise extremely rarely in nature. One of the few known transmissible cancers causes facial tumors in Tasmanian devils, and is threatening this species with extinction. Today, scientists report the discovery of a second transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils. The discovery, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, calls into question our current understanding of the processes that drive cancers to become transmissible.
Wellcome Trust, Australian Research Council, Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Grants, Save the Tasmanian Devil Program

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-795-746-8218
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 28-Dec-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Breast cancer detection rate using ultrasound is shown to be comparable to mammography
The use of ultrasound in detecting breast cancer has been shown to be comparable in its sensitivity to that of mammography and should be considered when testing for the disease according to a study published Dec. 28 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 28-Dec-2015
Neurosurgery
Hypnosis may provide new option for 'awake surgery' for brain cancer
Could hypnosis help to reduce the psychological trauma associated with 'awake craniotomy' for brain cancers? A new 'hypnosedation' technique offers a new alternative for patients undergoing awake surgery for gliomas, suggests a study in the January issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 28-Dec-2015
Oral Oncology
Cell harm seen in lab tests of e-cigarettes
A lab team at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System tested two types of electronic cigarettes and found they damaged cells in ways that could lead to cancer. The damage occurred even with nicotine-free versions of the products.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, Brandon C. Gromada Head and Neck Cancer Foundation

Contact: Cindy C. Butler
cynthia.butler@va.gov
858-552-4373
Veterans Affairs Research Communications

Public Release: 26-Dec-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Financial burden of cancer survivorship varies by age, cancer site
Survivors of cancer pay thousands of dollars in excess medical expenditures every year, with the excess financial burden varying by age and cancer site.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 24-Dec-2015
Cell
UTSW scientists discover a new role for RNA in safeguarding human chromosome number
Molecular biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a gene called NORAD that helps maintain the proper number of chromosomes in cells, and that when inactivated, causes the number of chromosomes in a cell to become unstable, a key feature of cancer cells.
Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Personalizing cancer therapies may combat resistance to targeted therapy drugs
Massachusetts General Hospital physicians report the case of a patients whose lung cancer was re-sensitized to crizotinib, a first-generation targeted therapy drug, by a mutation conferring resistance to a more selective, next-generation ALK inhibitor.
Pfizer, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Foundation for Cancer Research, Be a Piece of the Solution, Lungstrong

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
JAMA Oncology
Comparing chemical and surgical castration for prostate cancer
Surgical castration to remove the testicles (orchiectomy) of men with metastatic prostate cancer was associated with lower risks for adverse effects compared with men who underwent medical castration with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) therapy, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Johanna Younghans
Jyounghans@partners.org
617-525-6373
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
PLOS Computational Biology
Mapping cancer's 'social networks' opens new approaches to treatment
Cancer Research UK-funded scientists have designed a computer model that applies techniques used to analyze social networks to identify new ways of treating cancer, according to research published in PLOS Computational Biology today.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Emily Head
emily.head@cancer.org.uk
44-203-469-6189
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Educating patients improves knowledge and attitudes about participating in research
A five-center national study led by Neal Meropol, M.D., and a team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center demonstrated that a little information goes a long way in encouraging cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials, a decision that could be potentially lifesaving.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marc Kaplan
marc.kaplan@case.edu
216-272-5763
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Study uncovers inherited genetic susceptibility across 12 cancer types
In a new analysis, researchers have shed light on the hereditary elements across 12 cancer types -- showing a surprising inherited component to stomach cancer and providing some needed clarity on the consequences of certain types of mutations in well-known breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Ministry of Education in Taiwan Fellowship

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
JAMA
Low rate of job retention following colorectal cancer diagnosis
Nearly half of working individuals with stage III colorectal cancer surveyed did not retain their jobs reportedly due to their cancer diagnosis and treatment, according to a study in the Dec. 22/29 issue of JAMA. Paid sick leave was associated with a greater likelihood of job retention and reduced personal financial burden.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
JAMA
Less financial burden for cancer patients with paid sick leave, study finds
In a survey of more than 1,300 patients with stage 3 colorectal cancer, researchers found that only 55 percent who were employed at the time of diagnosis retained their jobs after treatment. Patients who had paid sick leave were nearly twice as likely to retain their jobs as those without paid sick leave.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
JAMA
Long-term outcomes of preventing premature menopause during chemotherapy
Compared with receiving chemotherapy alone, women with breast cancer who also received the hormonal drug triptorelin to achieve ovarian suppression had a higher long-term probability of ovarian function recovery, without a statistically significant difference in pregnancy rate or disease-free survival, according to a study in the Dec. 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Lucia Del Mastro, M.D.
lucia.delmastro@hsanmartino.it
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Simple shell of plant virus sparks immune response against cancer
Shells of cowpea mosaic virus inhaled into a lung tumor or injected into ovarian, colon or breast tumors, not only triggered the immune system in mice to wipe out the tumors, but provided systemic protection against metastases.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
PLOS Genetics
Mutation of BAP1 gene passed down over centuries
In the findings published in PLOS Genetics, through genetic and genealogical studies by Michele Carbone, M.D., Ph.D., director of the UH Cancer Center's Thoracic Oncology Program and colleagues, it was demonstrated that the family members were related and that they descended from a couple that immigrated to the US from Germany in the early 1700's.

Contact: Nana Ohkawa
nohkawa@cc.hawaii.edu
808-564-5911
University of Hawaii Cancer Center

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Even before ACA, cancer survivors in non-expansion states had less health-care access
Even in the health-care landscape as it existed before the ACA, cancer survivors in states without expanded Medicaid were less likely to have a personal doctor and more likely to report inability to see a doctor due to cost (odds ratios 0.76 and 1.14 respectively).

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nature Plants
FIU scientists discover how arsenic builds up in plant seeds
Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry P. Rosen and Jian Chen, both from the Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, are part of an international team that has identified how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice. The discovery holds the promise of the future development of healthier rice grains.

Contact: Jannel Garcia
janngarc@fiu.edu
305-348-0695
Florida International University

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Genes & Development
Unusual drug generates exciting results in mouse models of metastatic breast cancer
A team at CSHL today publishes preclinical data based on experiments in mice suggesting the promise of a novel drug directed against a novel target in malignant mammary tumors. The work excites team leader David L. Spector because in mouse models of human metastatic breast cancer it has produced 'differentiation of an aggressive primary tumor, redirecting it from a highly proliferative state, and reducing its metastatic activity by 70 percent.' Both the drug and its target are nucleic acids.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Babylon Breast Cancer Coalition, and Cancer Center Support Grant

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Cancer Discovery
Immune suppressor cells identified for advanced prostate cancer
Immune suppressor cells called MDSCs (myeloid-derived suppressor cells) may be important in developing treatments for advanced prostate cancer, according to a study at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Angewandte Chemie
TSRI and St. Jude scientists study single 'transformer' proteins with role in cancer
A new study led by scientists at the Scripps Research Institute and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital shows how a protein involved in cancer twists and morphs into different structures. This protein has many functions and, when mutated, has been shown to interfere with cells' normal tumor suppressing ability.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC, American Heart Association

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1338.

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