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Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1287.

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Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
PLOS Medicine
Moles linked to risk for breast cancer
Cutaneous nevi, commonly known as moles, may be a novel predictor of breast cancer, according to two studies published in this week's PLOS Medicine. Jiali Han and colleagues from Indiana University and Harvard University, United States, and Marina Kvaskoff and colleagues from INSERM, France, report that women with a greater number of nevi are more likely to develop breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Applied Physics B - Laser and Optics
Compact proton therapy for fight against cancer
The future face of modern-day anti-cancer therapy based on charged particles like protons could potentially involve using laser accelerators. However, these facilities will need to be reduced in terms of both size and cost compared to conventional ones. In the scientific journal, Applied Physics B, Dresden medical physicist Umar Masood is the first to present a new design for the entire complex machine - from the accelerator to the radiation site. In the process, he has successfully cut the facility's size in half.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Lung Cancer
ESMO survey sheds light on common clinical practice for incompletely resected lung cancer
A landmark survey of more than 700 specialists provides crucial real-world insight into the treatments most oncologists choose for lung cancer patients whose tumour has been incompletely resected, an expert from the European Society for Medical Oncology says.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Guidelines address long-term needs of prostate cancer survivors
New Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care guidelines outline posttreatment clinical follow-up care for long-term and late effects faced by an estimated 2.8 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Cancer Research
New research could provide key to overcoming resistance to HER2 targeted cancer treatments
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have made a significant discovery of a new biomarker which may help overcome resistance to newer and more targeted anti-cancer drugs, such as Herceptin, for HER2 positive cancers. These findings may also help the early identification of patients who will benefit more from these treatments. The findings have just been published in leading international, peer reviewed journal: Cancer Research, the most frequently cited cancer journal in the world.
Science Foundation Ireland, Marie Keating Foundation, European Union Framework Programme 7 Cooperation in Science & Technology

Contact: Yolanda Kennedy
yokenned@tcd.ie
353-189-63551
Trinity College Dublin

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Leukemia
Game changer for leukemia therapy
Australian researchers are zeroing in on a promising new approach to killing off cancer cells in patients with leukemia.
Leukemia Foundation of Australia

Contact: Deborah White, University of Adelaide
deborah.white@sahmri.com
61-881-284-302
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
Chemo-radionuclide therapy halts neuroendocrine cancer
Advanced cancer of the neuroendocrine system can lead to dismal prognoses, but a novel therapy is packing a punch by uniting powerful radionuclide treatment and chemotherapy drugs, revealed researchers at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
Enzyme-inhibition could revolutionize molecular imaging
The prominent role a single enzyme plays in cancer imaging has eluded researchers for years, but not anymore. This discovery could pave new avenues in nuclear medicine. The enzyme, called neutral endopeptidase, has a way of breaking down most radiopeptide imaging agents in the body. Researchers have developed an elegant new concept that improves molecular imaging, according to study results presented during the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Combination therapy may help patients with follicular lymphoma
Follicular lymphoma is an incurable form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is diagnosed each year in 120,000 people worldwide. Researchers show that a high-risk group of patients with the disease could benefit from a novel drug combination.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Leukemia Research Foundation, and others

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
Radioluminescence tells the story of single cells
With a new molecular imaging system powerful enough to peer down to 20-micrometer resolution, researchers can now use radioluminescence to examine the characteristics of single, unconnected cells. The result is a fascinating picture of diversity among cells previously assumed to behave the same, revealed researchers at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Cancer
Most breast cancer patients may not be getting enough exercise
Physical activity after breast cancer diagnosis has been linked with prolonged survival and improved quality of life, but most participants in a large breast cancer study did not meet national physical activity guidelines after they were diagnosed.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Resistance to lung cancer targeted therapy can be reversed, study suggests
Up to 40 percent of lung cancer patients do not respond to a targeted therapy designed to block tumor growth -- a puzzling clinical setback that researchers have long tried to solve. Now, scientists have discovered why that intrinsic resistance occurs -- and they pinpoint a drug they say could potentially reverse it.

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
A few circulating cancer cells could cue risk of metastases
A simple noninvasive blood test matched with state-of-the-art molecular imaging of individual cells could help oncologists understand their patients' chances of survival, say researchers at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
UNC researchers pinpoint new role for enzyme in DNA repair, kidney cancer
Twelve years ago, UNC School of Medicine researcher Brian Strahl, PhD, found that a protein called Set2 plays a role in how yeast genes are expressed -- specifically how DNA gets transcribed into messenger RNA. Now his lab has found that Set2 is also a major player in DNA repair, a complicated and crucial process that can lead to the development of cancer cells if the repair goes wrong.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
What's the best test for cervical cancer? Pap, HPV or both?
Should US women be screened for cervical cancer with Pap tests, HPV tests or both? According to researchers from Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center while the merits of screening tests and screening intervals warrant further discussion, they firmly believe that increasing the number of women who participate in cancer screenings and ensuring that women are not lost to follow-up with lengthened screening intervals is more important than the choice of test to decrease rates of cervical cancer.

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
Presurgical SPECT/CT shows more cancer than current standard
Startling data from an international multi-center trial provide growing evidence that sentinel node imaging is more effectively accomplished with hybrid functional imaging with single photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography than with another molecular imaging technique called lymphoscintigraphy. This conclusion held after imaging a range of cancers displaying a variety of lymphatic drainage types associated with melanoma, an aggressive skin cancer; breast carcinoma; and malignancies of the pelvis, such as prostate and cervical cancer.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Stem Cell Reports
Mount Sinai researchers identify protein that keeps blood stem cells healthy as they age
A protein may be the key to maintaining the health of aging blood stem cells, according to work by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai recently published online in Stem Cell Reports.

Contact: Lucia Lee
NewsMedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Needle biopsy underused in breast cancer diagnosis, negatively impacting diagnosis and care
Needle biopsy, the standard of care radiological procedure for diagnosing breast cancer, is underused with too many patients undergoing the more invasive, excisional biopsy to detect their disease, according to research from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print contents for June 9, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, June 9, 2014, in the JCI: 'Clinical trial evaluates ex vivo cultured cord blood,' 'Murine model of Ewing's sarcoma reveals tumor origins,' 'Vitamin B12-dependent taurine synthesis regulates growth and bone mass,' 'Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder,' 'Characterization of pandemic influenza immune memory signature after vaccination or infection,' and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Circulation
Lifetime cancer risk from heart imaging low for most children; rises with complex tests
Children with heart disease are exposed to low levels of radiation during X-rays, which do not significantly raise their lifetime cancer risk. However, children who undergo repeated complex imaging tests that deliver higher doses of radiation may have a slightly increased lifetime risk of cancer, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, Mend a Heart Foundation

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
African-American women more likely to be diagnosed with higher risk breast cancer
A research study led by cancer specialists at MedStar Washington Hospital Center's Washington Cancer Institute found that African-American women frequently present with biologically less favorable subtypes of breast cancer. The researchers analyzed the biology of breast cancer in 100 African-American women, using a method of genomic profiling. These genomic tests look at the expression of genes associated with the risk of recurrence in the population and further characterizes the biology of the tumor.
National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources, Safeway Foundation

Contact: Sylvia T. Ballinger
sylvia.t.ballinger@medstar.net
202-877-7072
MedStar Washington Hospital Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
PSMA-based imaging traces even treatment-resistant prostate cancer
Anti-androgen hormonal therapy, also called chemical castration, can be an important defense against further disease progression for patients with prostate cancer that has traveled and grown in other areas, or metastasized -- but some cases simply do not respond to this treatment. A groundbreaking molecular imaging agent has been developed to help clinicians find as much cancer as possible, whether it is responding favorably or not, in an effort to improve clinical decision making for these patients.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
Molecular breast imaging protocol unmasks more cancer
Patients with advanced breast cancer that may have spread to their lymph nodes could benefit from a more robust dose of a molecular imaging agent called Tc-99m filtered sulfur colloid when undergoing lymphoscintigraphy, a functional imaging technique that scouts new cancer as it begins to metastasize. Best results also indicate that imaging could be improved by injecting the agent the day prior to surgical resection, according to research unveiled at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Fox Chase doctors urge caution over new analysis of Medicare payments
There's much to learn from the recent release of unprecedented amounts of data from the nation's second largest health insurer, Medicare, but only if interpreted cautiously, write two doctors at Fox Chase Cancer Center in the June 9 online edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-728-7784
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
2014 SNMMI Annual Meeting
Molecular imaging finds novel way to knock down breast cancer
For years researchers have been developing molecular imaging techniques that visualize hormonally active breast cancer cells -- specifically those testing positive for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. A recent innovation in breast cancer biomarkers seeks the HER3 receptor instead, which could mean more comprehensive breast cancer imaging and potential treatments, say experts presenting data during the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1287.

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