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Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1285.

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Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Cancer
Secondary thyroid cancer more deadly than primary malignancy in young individuals
A new analysis has found that adolescents and young adults who develop thyroid cancer as a secondary cancer have a significantly greater risk of dying than those with primary thyroid cancer.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Mdm2 suppresses tumors by pulling the plug on glycolysis
Cancer cells have long been known to have higher rates of the energy-generating metabolic pathway known as glycolysis. This enhanced glycolysis is thought to allow cancer cells to survive the oxygen-deficient conditions they experience in the center of solid tumors. Researchers reveal how damaged cells normally switch off glycolysis as they shut down and show that defects in this process may contribute to the early stages of tumor development.
Global COE Program, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Feb. 25, 2014
The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends against the use of beta-carotene or vitamin E supplements for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease or cancer, according to a recommendation statement being published inAnnals of Internal Medicine.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Feb. 24, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Feb. 24, 2014: PPAR-γ agonist reverses cigarette smoke induced emphysema in mice; Small molecule-dependent redcution of glutamate improves murine ALS, Increased autophagy associated with BRAF inhibitor resistance; Dynamin 2 as a target for X-linked centronuclear myopathy; Identification of an immune cell trafficking pathway in the CNS, and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Novel assay developed for detecting ALK rearrangement in NSCLC
Researchers have developed a novel technique for detecting ALK rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) that is more sensitive and easier to perform than currently available techniques. The technique can help enhance the routine practice of diagnostic ALK testing on NSCLCs, which is crucial for identifying patients with advanced NSCLC who are most likely to benefit from targeted therapy with an ALK inhibitor.

Contact: Kristin Richeimer
kristin.richeimer@iaslc.org
720-325-2953
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Two-pronged approach successfully targets DNA synthesis in leukemic cells
Researchers show that a novel two-pronged strategy targeting DNA synthesis can treat leukemia in mice while sparing damage to normal blood cells.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Duke teams set treatment priorities in new national research effort
Treatment regimens often evolve without strong scientific evidence of their benefits and drawbacks, particularly in comparison to other drugs or approaches. Now Duke Medicine is participating in a large national initiative aiming to fill in that missing information.
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A paper diagnostic for cancer
A low-cost urine test developed by MIT engineers amplifies signals from growing tumors to detect disease.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Mazumdar-Shaw International Oncology Fellowship, National Institutes of Health, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Significant discrepancies between FISH and IHC results for ALK testing
The findings of a recent study indicate that routine testing with both fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry may enhance the detection of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

Contact: Kristin Richeimer
kristin.richeimer@iaslc.org
720-325-2953
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Cancer
Uninsured adolescents and young adults more likely to be diagnosed with advanced cancer
A new American Cancer Society study shows that uninsured adolescents and young adults were far more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage cancer, which is more difficult and expensive to treat and more deadly, compared to young patients with health insurance.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Developmental Cell
Like mom or dad? Some cells randomly express one parent's version of a gene over the other
Both of our parents contribute one copy of a gene to our genetic makeup. Generally, both copies are switched on or off together. Occasionally, a cell will begin to use of one copy over the other. Today, a team of researchers at CSHL shows that this random phenomenon is far more likely to be found in mature, developed cell types than in their stem cell precursors, offering an unexpected glimpse of variability in gene expression.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Blocking autophagy with malaria drug may help overcome resistance to melanoma BRAF drugs
A new preclinical study published online ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Investigation from Penn Medicine researchers found that the root of BRAF drug resistance may lie in a never-before-seen autophagy mechanism induced by the BRAF inhibitors vermurafenib and dabrafenib.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Feb-2014
Nature Cell Biology
New technology detect cellular memory
In 2009, two women at BRIC, the University of Copenhagen joined forces to develop a new technology that could elucidate the mystery behind cellular memory. With this technology, they have now identified 100 new molecular players that ensure cellular knowledge of own identity at cell division. This is crucial for fetal development, to maintain body functions throughout life and prevent disease. The results are published in Nature Cell Biology.
European Research Council, Danish National Research Foundation, Danish Cancer Society

Contact: Katrine Sonne-Hansen
katrine.sonne@bric.ku.dk
45-35-32-56-48
University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 23-Feb-2014
Kidney International
Researchers make the invisible visible
As the first in the world, researchers from Aarhus have shown that a new scanning technique can see changes in metabolism that have until now remained invisible, while they are taking place.

Contact: Christoffer Laustsen
cl@mr.au.dk
45-78-45-61-06
Aarhus University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Selenium and vitamin E supplementation over recommended dietary intake may raise PC risk
In a large clinical trial testing dietary supplements for prostate cancer prevention, baseline selenium status (measured by toenail selenium concentration), in the absence of supplementation, was not associated with prostate cancer risk. However, when baseline toenail selenium concentrations were high, supplementation with high-dose selenium almost doubled the risk of high-grade prostate cancer risk among older men, according to a new study published Feb. 21 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Selenium and vitamin E supplements can increase risk of prostate cancer in some men
A multi-center study led by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has found that high-dose supplementation with both the trace element selenium and vitamin E increase the risk of high-grade prostate cancer. But importantly, this risk depends upon a man's selenium status before taking the supplements.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kristen Woodward
media@fredhutch.org
206-667-2210
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Promising cervical cancer study
Research on cervical cancer performed by a physician at the University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The multi-site research project by Bradley J. Monk, M.D., is expected to change the standard of care in advanced cervical cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lynne Reaves
lynne.reaves@dignityhealth.org
602-406-4734
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Hypnosis therapy shown to decrease fatigue levels in breast cancer patients
Breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy showed decreased fatigue as a result of cognitive behavioral therapy plus hypnosis, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
2014 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium
Reducing RT dose to bilateral IB lymph nodes results in better patient-reported salivary function
For head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, a reduction in the amount of radiation treatment volume to the submandibular (level IB) lymph nodes resulted in better patient-reported salivary function, according to research presented today at the 2014 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
michellek@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Cell behavior in low oxygen conditions mapped
Research at the University of Liverpool has explained how cells behave when placed in a low oxygen environment, a development that could have implications for cancer patients and other serious illnesses.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-2248
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
2014 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium
Unilateral radiation therapy for advanced stage tonsil cancer results in favorable outcomes
Limiting radiation therapy to lymph nodes on one side of the neck for advanced tonsil cancer resulted in good local regional control and no cancer recurrence on the untreated side, according to research presented today at the 2014 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
michellek@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
MD Anderson researcher uncovers some of the ancient mysteries of leprosy
The disease may be the oldest human-specific infection and date back millions of years.

Contact: Jim Newman
jnewman@mdanderson.org
713-792-0664
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Gut
Dismantling pancreas cancer's armor
Pancreas cancer is notoriously impervious to treatment and resists both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It has also been thought to provide few targets for immune cells, allowing tumors to grow unchecked. But new research from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center shows that pancreas cancer 'veils' itself from the immune system by recruiting specialized immune suppressor cells. The research team also found that removing these cells quickly triggers a spontaneous anti-tumor immune response.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Giles W. and Elise G. Mead Foundation, Safeway Foundation, Jack and Sylvia Paul Fund, and others

Contact: Kristen Woodward
media@fredhutch.org
206-667-2210
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Chemistry & Biology
Enhancement of chemotherapy by prevention of tumor cell repair
The body naturally tries to repair lesions in the DNA of tumor cells, and thus reduces the efficacy of chemotherapy. Blocking the mechanisms for DNA repair would help to potentiate chemotherapy by reducing the resistance of cells to treatment. A team directed by Frederic Coin, Inserm Research Director in Strasbourg, has discovered a new drug that inhibits repair: spironolactone, which seems likely to be used in the very short term as an adjuvant to chemotherapy.

Contact: Frédéric Coin
mfrederic.coin@igbmc.fr
33-388-653-200
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
PLOS Genetics
CNIO team explains lower cancer incidence rate in patients with central nervous system disesase
Alfonso Valencia, researcher and Vicedirector of Basic Research at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, today publishes the first evidence of a molecular relationship between cancer and central nervous system diseases in the journal PLOS Genetics. Specifically, the work identifies almost a hundred genes which could explain this relationship.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Showing releases 1126-1150 out of 1285.

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