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Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1247.

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Public Release: 2-May-2014
PLOS ONE
Researchers find way to decrease chemoresistance in ovarian cancer
Inhibiting enzymes that cause changes in gene expression could decrease chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer patients, researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Georgia say.
Georgia State University

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 2-May-2014
Digestive Disease Week
AGA unveils latest advances in GI research at DDW 2014
International leaders in the fields of gastroenterology and hepatology will gather together for Digestive Disease Week 2014, the largest and most prestigious gastroenterology meeting, from May 3- 6, 2014, at McCormick Place in Chicago, Ill.

Contact: Rachel Steigerwald
media@gastro.org
301-272-1603
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 2-May-2014
BMC Genomics
Novel analyses improve identification of cancer-associated genes from microarray data
Researchers a the Dartmouth Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences developed a new gene expression analysis approach for identifying cancer genes. The paper entitled, 'How to get the most from microarray data: advice from reverse genomics,' was published online March 21, 2014, in BMC Genomics. The study results challenge the current paradigm of microarray data analysis and suggest that the new method may improve identification of cancer-associated genes.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Derik Hertel
derik.hertel@dartmouth.edu
603-650-1211
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Human fat: A trojan horse to fight brain cancer?
Johns Hopkins researchers say they have successfully used stem cells derived from human body fat to deliver biological treatments directly to the brains of mice with the most common and aggressive form of brain tumor, significantly extending their lives.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science Signaling
'Achilles heel' of pancreatic cancer identified
A research team at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center reports that inhibiting a single protein completely shuts down growth of pancreatic cancer, a highly lethal disease with no effective therapy. 'We believe this is the true Achilles heel of pancreatic cancer ... This appears to be the critical switch that promotes cancer growth and progression,' says the study's senior investigator.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Burroughs Wellcome Clinical Scientist Award

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Cell Reports
Gene discovery links cancer cell 'recycling' system to potential new therapy
University of Rochester scientists have discovered a gene with a critical link to pancreatic cancer, and further investigation in mice shows that by blocking the gene's most important function, researchers can slow the disease and extend survival.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leslie Orr
Leslie_Orr@urmc.rochester.edu
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Cancer Research
New model can predict therapy outcomes in prostate cancer with bone metastasis
A new computational model that simulates bone metastasis of prostate cancer has the potential to rapidly assess experimental therapy outcomes and help develop personalized medicine for patients with this disease, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Population Association of America Annual Meeting
'Til sickness do us part: How illness affects the risk of divorce
In the classic marriage vow, couples promise to stay together in sickness and in health. But a new study finds that the risk of divorce among older married couples rises when the wife -- but not the husband -- becomes seriously ill.

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-647-9069
University of Michigan

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Journal of Leukocyte Biology
Scientists discover endogenous dendritic cell-derived interleukin-27 promotes tumor growth
In a new report published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, scientists lay the groundwork for the development of novel tumor therapies that may help rid the body of cancer by inhibiting the recruitment of a specific suppressive immune cell type called 'regulatory T-cells.'

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Vitamin D deficiency may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer
Vitamin D deficiency was an indicator of aggressive prostate cancer and spread of the disease in European-American and African-American men who underwent their first prostate biopsy because of abnormal prostate-specific antigen and/or digital rectal examination test results, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Vitamin D deficiency linked to aggressive prostate cancer
African-American and European-American men at high risk of prostate cancer have greater odds of being diagnosed with an aggressive form of the disease if they have a vitamin D deficiency.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Journal of Urology
Electronic nose sniffs out prostate cancer using urine samples
We may soon be able to make easy and early diagnoses of prostate cancer by smell. Investigators in Finland have established that a novel noninvasive technique can detect prostate cancer using an electronic nose. In a proof of principle study, the eNose successfully discriminated between prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia by 'sniffing' urine headspace (the space directly above the urine sample). Results using the eNose are comparable to testing prostate specific antigen, reports the Journal of Urology.

Contact: Linda Gruner
jumedia@elsevier.com
212-633-3923
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 1-May-2014
FASEB Journal
New discovery: Molecule links asthma and cancer and could aid in developing new treatments
A newly discovered molecule described in The FASEB Journal provides a new drug target for controlling both asthma-induced muscle thickening and cancerous tumor growth.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Cell Reports
A 30-year puzzle in breast cancer is solved
In a new study published today in Cell Reports, scientists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center demonstrate that mice lacking one copy of a gene called CTCF have abnormal DNA methylation and are markedly predisposed to cancer.

Contact: Michael Nank
mnank@fredhutch.org
206-667-2210
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 1-May-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Hyperfractionated RT improves local-regional control for patients with head and neck cancer
Patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy experienced improved local-regional control and, with patients censored at five years, improved overall survival with no increase in late toxicity, according to a study published in the May 1, 2014.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Leukemia
New myeloma-obesity research shows drugs can team with body's defenses
Obesity increases the risk of myeloma, and with obesity rates climbing particularly in the Hispanic population, Dr. Edward Medina is tracing the ways it affects cancer and use those pathways for more effective treatments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elizabeth Allen
allenea@uthscsa.edu
210-450-2020
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 1-May-2014
PLOS ONE
New combination therapy developed for multiple myeloma
Each year, more than 25,000 Americans are diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a form of blood cancer that often develops resistance to therapies. However, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are reporting promising results from laboratory experiments testing a new combination therapy that could potentially overcome the resistance hurdle.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 1-May-2014
FASEB Journal
Killing Kindlin-3 to cure breast cancer: 'Blood' protein implicated
A protein believed to be limited to the hematopoietic system, called Kindlin-3, has been identified as a major player in both the formation and spread of breast cancer to other organs. This discovery, published in the May 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, could open the door to an entirely new class of breast cancer drugs that targets this protein's newly found activity.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 1-May-2014
International Journal of Clinical Practice
Risk of weight gain deters some smokers from seeking treatment to quit
Smokers may avoid treatment to quit smoking if they previously gained weight while trying to quit, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.

Contact: Matthew Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Cell
Water-based 'engine' propels tumor cells through tight spaces in the body
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered how cancer cells spread through extremely narrow three-dimensional spaces in the body, identifying a propulsion system based on water and charged particles.
National Science Foundatoin, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Phil Sneiderman
prs@jhu.edu
443-997-9907
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Academic Pediatrics
Coached extracurricular activities may help prevent pre-adolescent smoking and drinking
Dartmouth researchers have found that tweens (preadolescents aged 10-14) who participate in a coached team sport a few times a week or more are less likely to try smoking. Their findings on the relationship between extracurricular activity and health risk behaviors are reported in 'The relative roles of types of extracurricular activity on smoking and drinking initiation among tweens,' which was recently published in Academic Pediatrics.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
American Society of Breast Surgeons Annual Meeting
Lymph node ultrasounds more accurate in obese breast cancer patients
Mayo Clinic research into whether ultrasounds to detect breast cancer in underarm lymph nodes are less effective in obese women has produced a surprising finding. Fat didn't obscure the images -- and ultrasounds showing no suspicious lymph nodes actually proved more accurate in overweight and obese patients than in women with a normal body mass index, the study found.

Contact: Sharon Theimer
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Cutting cancer to pieces: New research on bleomycin
In a new study, lead author Basab Roy -- a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute -- describes bleomycin's ability to cut through double-stranded DNA in cancerous cells, like a pair of scissors. Such DNA cleavage often leads to cell death in particular types of cancer cells.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
eLife
Salk Institute study identifies novel regulator of key gene expression in cancer
Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a key genetic switch linked to the development, progression and outcome of cancer, a finding that may lead to new targets for cancer therapies.

Contact: Chris Emery
cemery@salk.edu
858-453-4100
Salk Institute

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
International Journal of Epidemiology
Prostate cancer and blood lipids share genetic links
A new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Norway, significantly refines the association, highlighting genetic risk factors associated with low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides as key players and identifying 17 related gene loci that make risk contributions to levels of these blood lipids and to prostate cancer.
Kristian Gerhard Jebsen Foundation, Centre for Molecular Medicine Norway

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1247.

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