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Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1246.

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Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
Novel mutations define 2 types of bone tumor
Scientists discover that, in almost every patient, specific mutations in two related genes drive the development of two types of bone cancer. This study, published in Nature Genetics on 27 Oct, provides improved diagnosis for patients suffering from these debilitating bone tumours and offers a starting point for research into specific treatments against these diseases.
Wellcome Trust, Skeletal Cancer Action Trust, UK, and Rosetrees Trust UK

Contact: Aileen Sheehy
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
0044-012-234-92368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature Cell Biology
Mount Sinai researchers identify mechanisms and potential biomarkers of tumor cell dormancy
Oncologists have long puzzled over the fact that after cancer treatment, single cancer cells that are dispersed throughout the body -- so-called disseminated tumor cells -- are quick to grow and form secondary tumors called metastases in certain organs, while in other organs they metastasize more slowly, sometimes decades later.

Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Johns Hopkins Medicine news tips from the 2013 American Society of Human Genetics conference
Tip sheet for the American Society of Human Genetics Conference at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center on Oct. 22-26, 2013 in Boston, Mass.

Contact: Vanessa McMains
vmcmain1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9410
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers track lethal prostate cancer to determine clonal origin
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University track the development of lethal prostate cancer in a patient.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation David Mazzone Challenge Award and Creativity Award, The V Found

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Oct. 25, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Oct. 25, 2013 in the JCI: Ionizing radiation exposure promotes fusion oncogene formation, Researchers track lethal prostate cancer to determine clonal origin, Reduction of reactive oxygen species in diabetes-associated nephrology, Synthetic vitamin D receptor ligands reduce murine kidney fibrosis, Itch maintains regulatory T cell stability, Essential amino acid supplementation in patients following total knee arthroplasty
National Institutes of Health, United Therapeutics Inc., Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Fundación Ramón Areces, The Cardiova

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Analyst
Recognizing cancer diseases at an early stage
Researchers have developed a new spectroscopic method to support pathologists in diagnosing cancer. In the "Journal of Biophotonics" and the "Analyst" they compared conventional procedures for colon cancer identification with a novel method called label-free "spectral histopathology". "Contrary to previous methods we no longer have to stain the tissue in order to detect cancer," says Professor Klaus Gerwert . "In the future, this will give us the opportunity to classify a tissue sample automatically as being either normal or diseased."

Contact: Dr. Klaus Gerwert
gerwert@bph.rub.de
49-234-322-4461
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Ionizing radiation exposure promotes fusion oncogene formation
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, James Fagin and colleagues at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, examined tissues from Ukrainian PTC patients that were children at the time of the Chernobly catastrophe and identified their cancer-driving mutations.
National Institutes of Health, Margot Rosenberg Pulitzer Foundation, Byrne Fund, Lefkofsky Family Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Multiple, distinct Y chromosomes associated with significant excess risk of prostate cancer
Multiple, distinct Y chromosomes associated with significant excess prostate cancer risk, according to analysis of Utah's multi-generational families. Researchers to search these Y chromosomes for genetic mutations that predispose a man to develop the cancer.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
SETCOR Nanotech Dubai 2013
Nano-dwarves turn tumor assassins
Chemotherapy is often preferred for fighting cancer, but its side effects can be considerable. A new technique may reduce these in future: nanoparticle-encapsulated substances could kill off tumor cells selectively. This will be easier on patients.

Contact: Dr. Joachim Storsberg
Joachim.Storsberg@iap.fraunhofer.de
49-331-568-1321
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Psycho-Oncology
New study shows positive personal growth following breast cancer diagnosis
Although being diagnosed with breast cancer is usually an extremely stressful experience for most women, a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has found that there also can be unexpected benefits.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
World Molecular Imaging Congress
GVSU students contribute to growing medical field
A group of four Grand Valley students and graduates, and Anthony Chang from VAI, presented three years worth of research at the World Molecular Imaging Congress, one of the largest meetings in the medical imaging field, Sept. 18-21 in Savannah, Georgia.

Contact: Leah Twilley
twilleyl@gvsu.edu
616-331-2221
Grand Valley State University

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of Chemical Physics
Understanding DNA damage
Every day, all day, our DNA gets beaten up by chemicals and radiation -- but remarkably, most of us stay healthy. Now, an investigation by a team of French and Canadian researchers has produced insights into a little-studied but common radiation threat to DNA: low-energy electrons, with energies of 0-15 electron volts.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Social service barriers delay care among women with abnormal cancer screening
A recent study performed by researchers at Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston University School of Public Health, and Tufts Medical Center found that women with multiple barriers to healthcare, especially those with social barriers such as problems with housing and income, experienced delays in cancer screening follow up compared to those with fewer barriers or no social barriers.

Contact: Gina Orlando
gina.orlando@bmc.org
617-638-8490
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Mutations in novel tumor suppressor gene associated with early onset breast cancer
Researchers have identified association between heritable, rare mutations in RINT1 gene and increased risk of early onset breast cancer. Although mutations in RINT1 are rare, it is most likely that the remaining unknown breast cancer susceptibility genes will account for similar small proportions of the disease, scientist said.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Gene-diet interaction may help explain link between eating meat & colorectal cancer risk
A significant interaction between genetic variant rs4143094 and processed meat consumption was detected in first study with statistical power to identify such an association across genome of large population.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
BROCA sequencing approach evaluates all 24 genes implicated in breast cancer
Comprehensive testing for all known inherited breast cancer gene mutations explains occurrence of the cancer in women with normal BRCA genes and family history of the disease, Mary-Claire King, Ph.D., and Tomas Walsh, Ph.D., report at ASHG 2013.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
First gene detected for most common form of mitral valve prolapse
DNA of large, multi-generational family provided genetic clue to location of gene for common heart disease, mitral valve prolapse. Researchers then used animal models to define normal biological functions altered by gene mutation.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Physicists decode decision circuit of cancer metastasis
Researchers from Rice University's Center for Theoretical Biological Physics have deciphered the operating principles of a genetic circuit that allows cancer to metastasize. The study revealed that the decision circuit has three settings, an oddity that could open the door to cancer treatments that disrupt the circuit.
National Science Foundation, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, Tauber Family Funds at Tel Aviv University

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Researchers identify gene variant that raises risk for colorectal cancer from eating processed meat
A common genetic variant that affects one in three people significantly increases the risk of colorectal cancer from the consumption of red meat and processed meat.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Suzanne Wu
suzanne.wu@usc.edu
213-740-0252
University of Southern California

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Blood
Study ties bone marrow transplant to negative sexual side effects
New research ties preparative procedures and complications associated with blood or bone marrow transplantation (stem cell transplantation, SCT) with diminished sexual health in both men and women who have undergone the lifesaving procedure.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
202-552-4914
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Preclinical study finds drug helps against pancreatic cancer
An investigational drug that disrupts tumor blood vessels shows promise against a rare type of pancreatic cancer, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found. Their results were presented October 20 during a poster session at an international cancer conference.

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
Leukemia
EORTC study suggests detecting ERG gene deletion useful for risk stratification in childhood ALL
Results of EORTC trial 58951 suggest that detecting ERG gene deletion at diagnosis of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia would be useful for risk stratification. The study, published in Leukemia showed that patients with the ERG gene deletion had a very good outcome with an 8-year event-free survival of 86.4 percent and an overall survival of 95.6 percent.
Laurette Fugain Foundation, EORTC Charitable Trust

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Cell Cycle
Study: Metformin for breast cancer less effective at higher glucose concentrations
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online this month in the journal Cell Cycle shows that breast cancer cell growth, motility and aggression is promoted by excess glucose, as experienced by patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The study also showed that patients with high glucose may require higher doses of the drug metformin to achieve the same anti-cancer activity as patients with normal glucose levels.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Komen

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Data reaffirms test's ability to identify benign thyroid nodules
The latest study co-led by a CU School of Medicine researcher has confirmed that a Gene Expression Classifier test can drastically reduce the problem of unnecessary surgeries in thyroid nodule assessment. These indeterminate nodules are being evaluated with a new molecular diagnostic test that measures the expression levels of 142 genes. This test is able to identify which initially indeterminate nodules are highly likely to be benign, and thus allows patients to avoid unnecessary diagnostic surgery.

Contact: Jackie Brinkman
jackie.brinkman@ucdenver.edu
303-724-1525
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
New England Journal of Medicine
NEJM study exposes overuse of radiation therapy when urologists profit from self-referral
A comprehensive review of Medicare claims for more than 45,000 patients from 2005 through 2010 found that nearly all of the 146 percent increase in intensity- modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer among urologists with an ownership interest in the treatment was due to self-referral, according to new research, "Urologists' Use of Intensity- Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer," released today in The New England Journal of Medicine for its October 24, 2013 issue.
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
michellek@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Showing releases 1176-1200 out of 1246.

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