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Showing releases 1201-1225 out of 1250.

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Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Researchers identify gene variant that raises risk for colorectal cancer from eating processed meat
A common genetic variant that affects one in three people significantly increases the risk of colorectal cancer from the consumption of red meat and processed meat.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Suzanne Wu
suzanne.wu@usc.edu
213-740-0252
University of Southern California

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Gene-diet interaction may help explain link between eating meat & colorectal cancer risk
A significant interaction between genetic variant rs4143094 and processed meat consumption was detected in first study with statistical power to identify such an association across genome of large population.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
First gene detected for most common form of mitral valve prolapse
DNA of large, multi-generational family provided genetic clue to location of gene for common heart disease, mitral valve prolapse. Researchers then used animal models to define normal biological functions altered by gene mutation.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
Mutations in novel tumor suppressor gene associated with early onset breast cancer
Researchers have identified association between heritable, rare mutations in RINT1 gene and increased risk of early onset breast cancer. Although mutations in RINT1 are rare, it is most likely that the remaining unknown breast cancer susceptibility genes will account for similar small proportions of the disease, scientist said.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
BROCA sequencing approach evaluates all 24 genes implicated in breast cancer
Comprehensive testing for all known inherited breast cancer gene mutations explains occurrence of the cancer in women with normal BRCA genes and family history of the disease, Mary-Claire King, Ph.D., and Tomas Walsh, Ph.D., report at ASHG 2013.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
press@ashg.org
858-243-1814
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Biomedical Optics Express
Imaging breast cancer with light
Breast cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer and cancer deaths among women worldwide. Routine screening can increase breast cancer survival by detecting the disease early and allowing doctors to address it at this critical stage. A team of researchers at the University of Twente in the Netherlands have developed a prototype of a new imaging tool that may one day help to detect breast cancer early, when it is most treatable.

Contact: Lyndsay Meyer
lmeyer@osa.org
202-416-1435
The Optical Society

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Leukemia
CNIO researchers discover new genetic errors that could cause 1 of the most deadly leukaemias
Acute dendritic leukaemia is a rare type of leukaemia, but one with the worst prognosis -- the average patient survival rate is just 12-14 months -- that is difficult to treat. Juan Cruz Cigudosa's team, from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre's Molecular Cytogenetics Group, has for the first time sequenced the exome of dendritic cell leukaemia. The analyses, published in the journal Leukemia, uncover new genetic pathways that could revolutionize treatment guidelines for these patients.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Clinical Cancer Research
A simple test may catch early pancreatic cancer
Reporting on a small preliminary study, Johns Hopkins researchers say a simple blood test based on detection of tiny epigenetic alterations may reveal the earliest signs of pancreatic cancer, a disease that is nearly always fatal because it isn't usually discovered until it has spread to other parts of the body.
National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
UAlberta medical researchers discover potential new treatment for colitis
A drug currently on the market to treat leukemia reversed symptoms of colitis in lab tests, according to recently published findings by medical researchers with the University of Alberta.
Alberta Innovates Health Solutions, Hair Massacure, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Raquel Maurier
rmaurier@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
ACS Nano
Stealth nanoparticles lower drug-resistant tumors' defenses
Some of the most dangerous cancers are those that can outmaneuver the very drugs designed to defeat them, but researchers are now reporting a new Trojan-horse approach. In a preliminary study in the journal ACS Nano focusing on a type of breast cancer that is highly resistant to current therapies, they describe a way to sneak small particles into tumor cells, lower their defenses and attack them with drugs, potentially making the therapy much more effective.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Chimerism
Older siblings' cells can be passed from female dogs to their puppies in the womb, MU researchers find
Researchers from the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine found that microchimerism, a condition where some people possess a small number of cells in their bodies that are not genetically their own, can be passed from a female dog to her offspring while they are still in the womb.

Contact: Nathan Hurst
hurstn@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Anesthesiology
Neurotoxin effectively relieves bone cancer pain in dogs, Penn researchers find
By the time bone cancer is diagnosed in a pet dog, it is often too late to save the animal's life. Instead, the goal of treatment is to keep the dog as comfortable and free of pain as possible for as long as possible. A study by University of Pennsylvania veterinarians Dorothy Cimino Brown and Kimberly Agnello has demonstrated that a single spinal injection of a neurotoxin provided more relief from pain than the pain-relieving drugs that are typically used.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
New England Journal of Medicine
NEJM study exposes overuse of radiation therapy when urologists profit from self-referral
A comprehensive review of Medicare claims for more than 45,000 patients from 2005 through 2010 found that nearly all of the 146 percent increase in intensity- modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer among urologists with an ownership interest in the treatment was due to self-referral, according to new research, "Urologists' Use of Intensity- Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer," released today in The New England Journal of Medicine for its October 24, 2013 issue.
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
michellek@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A protein safeguards against cataracts
The refractive power of the human eye lens relies on a densely packed mixture of proteins. Special protective proteins ensure that these proteins do not clump together as time passes. When this protective mechanism fails, the ocular lens becomes clouded -- the patient develops a cataract. Scientists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen have now resolved the activation mechanism of one of these protective proteins, laying the foundation for the development of new therapeutic alternatives.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
andreas.battenberg@tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Cell Cycle
Study: Metformin for breast cancer less effective at higher glucose concentrations
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online this month in the journal Cell Cycle shows that breast cancer cell growth, motility and aggression is promoted by excess glucose, as experienced by patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The study also showed that patients with high glucose may require higher doses of the drug metformin to achieve the same anti-cancer activity as patients with normal glucose levels.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Komen

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Data reaffirms test's ability to identify benign thyroid nodules
The latest study co-led by a CU School of Medicine researcher has confirmed that a Gene Expression Classifier test can drastically reduce the problem of unnecessary surgeries in thyroid nodule assessment. These indeterminate nodules are being evaluated with a new molecular diagnostic test that measures the expression levels of 142 genes. This test is able to identify which initially indeterminate nodules are highly likely to be benign, and thus allows patients to avoid unnecessary diagnostic surgery.

Contact: Jackie Brinkman
jackie.brinkman@ucdenver.edu
303-724-1525
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
15th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Penn docs find successful strategy to expand patient participation in hard-to-enroll clinical trials
Clinical trials are key to finding new cancer treatments, but with patient participation hovering around 5 percent, new strategies are needed to boost enrollment, particularly to study the rare cancers that have so few cases. One such strategy comes from a new abstract being presented Oct. 28 at the 15th World Conference on Lung Cancer from researchers at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania studying mesothelioma.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Cancer wasting due in part to tumor factors that block muscle repair, study shows
A new study reveals that tumors release factors into the bloodstream that inhibit the repair of damaged muscle fibers, and that this contributes to muscle loss during cancer wasting. The condition, also called cancer cachexia, accompanies certain cancers, causes life-threatening loss of body weight and is responsible for up to one-in-four cancer deaths. The condition has no treatment. The study points to new strategies and new drug targets for treating cancer cachexia.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
15th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Diabetes drug metformin with chemo and radiation may improve outcomes in lung cancer patients
Treating aggressive lung cancer with the diabetes drug metformin along with radiation and chemotherapy may slow tumor growth and recurrence, suggests new preliminary findings from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania being presented during an oral abstract session Oct. 28 at the 15th World Conference on Lung Cancer.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Coffee consumption reduces risk of liver cancer
Coffee consumption reduces risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer, by about 40 percent, according to an up-to-date meta-analysis published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. Further, some data indicate that three cups of coffee per day reduce liver cancer risk by more than 50 percent.

Contact: Aimee Frank
media@gastro.org
301-941-2620
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Sequential GO and chemotherapy no benefit for older AML patients according to EORTC/GIMEMA trial
Results of the randomized, phase III, EORTC/GIMEMA 06012 intergroup trial (AML-17) reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology show that sequential combination of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) and standard chemotherapy provides no benefit for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia and is too toxic for patients 70 years of age or more. GO is an antibody-drug conjugate comprised of an anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody linked to a cytotoxic agent.
Pfizer

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Society for Medical Decision Making Annual Meeting
New program makes prostate cancer treatment decisions easier
When the pros and cons of prostate cancer treatment are spelled out using an online interactive program developed by Thomas Jefferson University researchers, more patients choose active surveillance over therapy.

Contact: Edyta Zielinska
edyta.zielinska@jefferson.edu
215-955-5291
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Cancer
Colon cancer screening guidelines may miss 10 percent of colon cancers
For people with a family history of adenomas (colon polyps that lead to colon cancer), up to 10 percent of colorectal cancers could be missed when current national screening guidelines are followed.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Huntsman Cancer Foundation

Contact: Linda Aagard
801-587-7639
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Journal of Oncology Practice
Mount Sinai finds value and limitations of patient assistance programs for women with breast cancer
Patient assistance programs can help breast cancer patients meet a variety of needs that can interfere with getting recommended adjuvant therapies such as radiation, chemotherapy, and hormonal treatments, according to a study published recently in the online edition of the Journal of Oncology Practice.

Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
NewsMedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Atmospheric Environment
UCI-led study documents heavy air pollution in Canadian area with cancer spikes
Levels of contaminants higher than in some of the world's most polluted cities have been found downwind of Canada's largest oil, gas and tar sands processing zone, in a rural area where men suffer elevated rates of cancers linked to such chemicals.

Contact: Janet Wilson
janethw@uci.edu
949-824-3969
University of California - Irvine

Showing releases 1201-1225 out of 1250.

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