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Showing releases 1201-1225 out of 1279.

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Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
Nature Genetics
Smokers with gene defect have 1 in 4 chance of developing lung cancer
Around a quarter of smokers who carry a defect in the BRCA2 gene will develop lung cancer at some point in their lifetime, a large-scale, international study reveals.

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
New report estimates nearly 19 million cancer survivors in the US by 2024
The number of cancer survivors in the United States, currently estimated to be 14.5 million, will grow to almost 19 million by 2024.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Drug combination extends survival by more than a year in metastatic prostate cancer
Men with newly diagnosed metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer lived more than a year longer when they received a chemotherapy drug as initial treatment instead of waiting to for the disease to become resistant to hormone-blockers, report scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
440-670-6563
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
Nature Genetics
Newly identified brain cancer mutation will aid drug development
A collaborative effort between Duke Medicine researchers and neurosurgeons and scientists in China has produced new genetic insights into a rare and deadly form of childhood and young adult brain cancer called brainstem glioma.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Oncologists: How to talk with your pathologist about cancer molecular testing
Aisner suggests close communication, systems approaches, keeping special requests to a minimum, and patience on the part of requesting oncologists. The key, she says, is writing new institutional protocols to keep pace with the new reliance on molecular testing.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Chemotherapy following radiation treatment improves progression-free survival
A chemotherapy regimen consisting of procarbazine, CCNU, and vincristine administered following radiation therapy improved progression-free survival and overall survival in adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain cancer, when compared to radiation therapy alone. The findings were part of the results of a Phase III clinical trial presented today at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting by the study's primary author Jan Buckner, M.D., deputy director, Cancer Practice, at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Joe Dangor
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
Nature
Paired enzyme action in yeast reveals backup system for DNA repair
The combined action of two enzymes, Srs2 and Exo1, prevents and repairs common genetic mutations in growing yeast cells, according to a new study led by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Mayo Clinic: Ovarian cancer subtypes may predict response to bevacizumab
Molecular sequencing could identify ovarian cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with bevacizumab (Avastin), a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. Results of the research were presented today at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting.
2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
Nature Medicine
'Quadrapeutics' works in preclinical study of hard-to-treat tumors
A Rice University-led study in this week's Nature Medicine reports the first preclinical tests for a novel anti-cancer technology called 'quadrapeutics' that converts current clinical treatments to instantaneously detect and kill only cancer cells. Quadrapeutics combines clinically available drugs, colloidal gold, pulsed lasers and radiation in a novel and safe micro-treatment that improved standard therapy by 17-fold against aggressive, drug-resistant tumors.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Simmons Family Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Phase 3 study strengthens support of ibrutinib as second-line therapy for CLL
In a head-to-head comparison of two Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia, ibrutinib significantly outperformed ofatumumab as a second-line therapy, according to a multicenter interim study published in the OnLine First edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. Ibrutinib is the first drug designed to target Bruton's tyrosine kinase, a protein essential for CLL-cell survival and proliferation.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Amanda Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Patients with metastatic colon cancer respond to new combination therapy
In an aggressive disease known for poor response rates, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found patients with advanced colorectal cancer responded well to a combination therapy of the drugs vermurafenib, cetuximab and irinotecan.

Contact: William Fitzgerald
externalcomm@mdanderson.org
713-792-0655
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Mount Sinai researchers to present studies at American Society of Clinical Oncology Meeting
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers will present several landmark studies at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting May 30-June 3, 2014, in Chicago, including data on new treatment approaches for thyroid, head and neck, and recurrent ovarian cancers; and new biomarkers for bile duct cancers.

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Responses with crizotinib in MET-amplified lung cancer show new targetable form of disease
A study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 reports the results of a first-in-human, phase 1 dose escalation trial of crizotinib in 14 patients with advanced, MET-amplified non-small cell lung cancer (NCT00585195).

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
303-524-2780
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
ASCO: One step closer to a breath test for lung cancer
Results of a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology show that a test of organic compounds in exhaled breath can not only distinguish patients with lung cancer from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but can also define the stage of any cancer present.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
ALK, ROS1 and now NTRK1: Study shows prevalence of new genetic driver in lung cancer
ASCO study reports the prevalence of the NTRK1 mutation in an unselected population of 450 lung cancer samples, with >1 percent of patients testing positive. This and other work from Dr. Doebele's group forms the basis of a phase 1 clinical trial targeting NTRK1 mutations in advanced solid tumors (NCT02122913).

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Clinical trial shows drug combination may be effective in recurrent ovarian cancer
Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago today. This is the first ovarian cancer study to use a combination of drugs that could be taken orally.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
440-670-6563
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Results in Phase I trial of OMP-54F28, a Wnt inhibitor targeting cancer stem cells
At the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers reported results of a Phase I trial of OMP-54F28, an investigational drug candidate discovered by OncoMed Pharmaceuticals targeting cancer stem cells. The drug was generally well tolerated, and several of the 26 patients with advanced solid tumors experienced stable disease for greater than six months.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
303-524-2780
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Studies reveal potential new targeted therapies for common, hard-to-treat cancers
Positive results from four clinical trials of investigational targeted drugs for advanced ovarian, lung, and thyroid cancers, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia were highlighted today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Findings from the mid- and late-stage trials suggest new ways to slow disease progression and improve survival for patients who experience relapses or resistance to available treatments.

Contact: Kelly Baldwin
kelly.baldwin@asco.org
312-949-3232
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Clinical trial shows drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer
Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago today.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
440-670-6563
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Studies reveal new strategies to improve quality of life
Key studies released today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology identify new strategies for easing the short- and long-term effects of cancer therapy and improving the quality of life of patients with cancer, as well as their caregivers.

Contact: Kelly Baldwin
kelly.baldwin@asco.org
312-949-3232
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 31-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Immune therapy for advanced bladder cancer yields promising results
A multi-center phase I study using an investigational drug for advanced bladder cancer patients who did not respond to other treatments has shown promising results in patients with certain tumor types, researchers report. Yale Cancer Center played a key role in the study, the results of which will be presented Saturday, May 31 at the 2014 annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

Contact: Vicky Agnew
vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 30-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Genetic profile predicts which bladder cancer patients will benefit from early chemotherapy
Three genetic changes can predict whether a patient will benefit from chemotherapy before surgery to remove bladder cancer, according to new findings presented by Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers during the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-815-7828
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 30-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Trial uncovers potential dangers of chemotherapy regimen for bladder cancer patients
Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer often benefit from chemotherapy before surgery to remove the tumor, but a test of one regimen by researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center was halted when too many people experienced serious side effects such as heart attacks and blood clots in the legs and lungs.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-815-7828
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 30-May-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Enzyme used in antidepressants could help researchers develop prostate cancer treatments
An international team of scientists including researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and the University of Southern California found that an enzyme commonly used as a target for antidepressants may also promote prostate cancer growth.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, University of Southern California-Taiwan Center for Translational Research, Daniel Tsai Family Fund

Contact: Cara Martinez
cara.martinez@cshs.org
310-423-7798
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 30-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Stopping statins may benefit terminally ill patients
People in the late stages of cancer and other terminal illnesses are not only unharmed by discontinuing statins for cholesterol management, they may benefit, according to a study presented Friday by researchers at Duke Medicine representing a national research network.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Showing releases 1201-1225 out of 1279.

<< < 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 > >>

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