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Showing releases 1226-1250 out of 1427.

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Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium
Chemoradiation may increase survival for a subset of elderly head and neck cancer patients
According to University of Colorado Cancer Center research presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium, the addition of chemotherapy (CT) to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival rates among a subset of elderly head and neck cancer patients, specifically those ages 71 to 79 with low comorbidity scores and advanced disease stage.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium
Cancer-causing gene found in plasma may help predict outcomes for head and neck patients
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have discovered that a human cancer-causing gene, called DEK, can be detected in the plasma of head and neck cancer patients. DEK may help doctors understand how a person's immune system could be used to treat cancer or predict outcomes for patients.
UC Division of Hematology Oncology

Contact: Katie Pence
katie.pence@uc.edu
513-558-4561
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Cell Reports
Study pinpoints driver, potential target in aggressive pediatric leukemia subtype
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study scheduled for Feb. 18, 2016 online publication in the journal Cell Reports models Early T-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ETP-ALL), discovering inactivation of the gene EZH2 as a driver and inroad to a potential therapeutic target in the disease.
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
JAMA Oncology
3-D mammography improves cancer detection and cuts 'call backs' over 3 years
The increased cancer detection and reduced call backs associated with 3-D mammography, also known as Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), can be maintained years after a patient's first DBT screening with regularly scheduled DBT imaging, according to a JAMA Oncology study published online today from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Greg Richter
greg.richter@uphs.upenn.edu
215-614-1937
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
JAMA Oncology
Are improved outcomes after initial implementation of digital breast tomosynthesis sustainable?
A new study of breast cancer screening published online by JAMA Oncology suggests 3-D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) outcomes were sustainable with significant reduction in patient recall, increasing cancer cases per recalled patients and a decline in interval cancers.

Contact: Greg Richter
gregory.richter@uphs.upenn.edu
215-614-1937
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
The EMBO Journal
Doughnut-shaped holes of killer proteins observed for the first time
Spanish and German researchers have successfully seen for the first time the pores, shaped like rings and crescent moons, that the Bax protein perforates in mitochondrial membranes. This advance has been achieved thanks to super-resolution microscopy and may help find the 'holy grail' of cell suicide, a crucial process in preventing cancer.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium
Chemotherapy before chemoradiation shows no survival advantage in head and neck cancer
Results presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium in Scottsdale, Arizona show patients receiving induction chemotherapy rather than chemoradiation live no longer and are less likely to receive definitive course of radiation treatment.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Cancer Discovery
When the immune system promotes tumor growth
The immune system plays an important role in the prevention of cancer. So-called Natural killer cells are innate immune cells and responsible for the elimination of cancerous cells. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna have now discovered that NK cells can switch and promote tumor growth, with STAT5 acting as the key regulator. Drugs targeting STAT5 may therefore boost tumor growth. The study was published in Cancer Discovery.

Contact: Susanna Berger
susanna.berger@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1153
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Lancet Oncology
Immune-targeting drug combo shows promise for lung cancer patients, says Moffitt
Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States resulting in more than 158,000 deaths each year. Moffitt Cancer Center, in conjunction with partner institutions, initiated a multicenter phase 1b clinical trial to determine the safety and efficacy of a new drug combination for non-small cell lung cancer that stimulates a patient's immune system to target and kill cancer cells.

Contact: Steve Blanchard
steve.blanchard@moffitt.org
813-745-1718
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
JAMA Surgery
Use of breast conservation surgery for cancer decreases; high-rate of reoperation
In a study published online by JAMA Surgery, Art Sedrakyan, M.D., Ph.D., of Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, and colleagues examined the use of breast conservation surgery (BCS) in New York State and determined rates of reoperation, procedure choice, and the effect of surgeon experience on the odds of a reoperation 90 days after BCS.

Contact: Jen Gundersen
jeg2034@med.cornell.edu
646-317-7402
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Inorganic Chemistry
Pairing pain medicine with metal ions to battle cancer
Fighting chemoresistant cancer remains a huge challenge that scientists are tackling from as many angles as they can. One alternative approach involves pairing two groups of compounds -- pain medicine and metal ions -- that have individually shown promise as anti-cancer agents. Scientists report in the ACS journal Inorganic Chemistry that combining the two led to new compounds that could destroy drug-resistant cancer cells and leave most normal cells alone in lab tests.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Southern Surgical Association Annual Meeting
Journal of American College of Surgeons
Chemotherapy preferable to radiotherapy to reduce distant pancreatic cancer recurrences
Patients who received chemotherapy after surgical resection of pancreatic cancer have fewer distant disease recurrences and longer overall survival than those who also had adjuvant chemoradiation therapy.

Contact: Devin Rose
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5324
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Autoantibodies may help detect lung cancer earlier
Preliminary research has identified autoantibodies, immune proteins found in the blood specific for one's own proteins, that can potentially detect lung cancer early by distinguishing between smokers with or without lung cancer and also discriminate between lung cancer and low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) detected non-cancerous lung lesions.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
Jeff.Wolf@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Researchers publish on connection between anal cancer, HPV
Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital, a Care New England hospital, recently published the results of a study demonstrating a connection between anal cancer and human papillomavirus infection.

Contact: Susan McDonald
slmcdonald@wihri.org
401-681-2816
Care New England

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
EBioMedicine
New predictor of cancer
Epigenetic age is a new way to measure your biological age. When your biological (epigenetic) age is older than your chronological age, you are at increased risk for getting and dying of cancer, reports a new study. And the bigger the difference between the two ages, the higher your risk of dying of cancer. The research could be used to develop an early detection blood test for cancer.
US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Researchers find marked gender differences in scholarly productivity
The differences between men and women seem to infiltrate yet another aspect of medicine with a study spearheaded at Women & Infants Hospital, a Care New England hospital, indicating that younger female gynecologic oncologists were less productive scholastically and, therefore, poorly represented in the higher academic ranks, than their male contemporaries.

Contact: Susan McDonald
slmcdonald@wihri.org
401-681-2816
Care New England

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
JAMA Internal Medicine
Mining a deep vein of data, researchers make key findings on IV device use
By looking at data from 10 Michigan hospitals participating in an unprecedented collaborative quality-improvement effort, researchers have shown how much variation exists when it comes to the use of intravenous devices called peripherally inserted central catheters, or PICCs.
BCBSM Value Partnerships program

Contact: Haley Otman
otmanh@med.umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Gastroenterology
Colorectal cancer patients need colonoscopy after cancer resection
It is critically important that colorectal cancer patients undergo colonoscopy after surgery to ensure that they do not have a second colon cancer, and to find and remove any additional polyps. According to new recommendations from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, the evidence shows that post-operative colonoscopy is associated with improved overall survival for colorectal cancer patients. Between 0.7 and 7 percent of colorectal cancer patients have a second, concurrent cancer.

Contact: Aimee Frank
media@gastro.org
301-941-2620
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
British Journal of Cancer
Male cancer survivors less likely to reproduce
Young male cancer survivors are three times as likely to turn to assisted fertilization to have children as males without a cancer diagnosis. This knowledge makes it possible to develop concrete treatment protocols, which affect fertility to a lesser degree. Measures like preserving sperm before starting treatment can be optimized. Close to 80 percent of those diagnosed during childhood or adolescence will survive their cancer.

Contact: Maria Winther Gunnes
maria.gunnes@uib.no
0047-481-92650
The University of Bergen

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
New survey shows strong public support for medical research in Louisiana
Louisiana's status as a leader in medical and health research is important to a strong majority of residents (89 percent), according to a state-based public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America. Sixty-nine percent of respondents agree that Louisiana state funds should be used to support scientific research at public universities, and 75 percent say spending money on medical research is important to Louisiana's economy in terms of jobs and incomes.

Contact: Anna Briseno
abriseno@researchamerica.org
571-482-2737
Research!America

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Injuries and other health concerns are more common in older people after certain cancer surgeries
Older people who undergo cancer surgery are more likely than their younger counterparts to experience injuries and health issues such as falling down, breaking bones, dehydration, bed sores, failure to thrive and delirium.

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology
What factors affect non-compliance with endocrine therapy among young women with breast cancer?
A new study from Harvard Medical School of young women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer showed that more than half did not believe endocrine therapy was essential, even though it has been proven to reduce recurrence and improve survival. Young women with HR+ breast cancer are at increased risk for recurrence and decreased survival, yet they are also more likely to fail to adhere to endocrine treatment as prescribed, as reported in the study published in Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
MD Anderson researchers propose new staging for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer
Human papillomavirus (HPV) status is a strong predictor of prognosis for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC), but the current staging system does not adequately account for biological and clinical differences between HPV-positive OPC and HPV-negative OPC, commonly caused by alcohol and tobacco use.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Immunity
Some chemotherapy drugs may improve tumor response to immune checkpoint therapy
The use of certain traditional chemotherapy drugs may expand the number of tumors that respond to one of today's most promising cancer therapies -- immune checkpoint blockade. Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Systems Biology report that inducing the infiltration of cytotoxic T cells into lung tumors sensitized otherwise unresponsive tumors to checkpoint blockade in animal models.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Science Signaling
First-in-class drug ONC201 shows potential for some blood cancers
ONC201, an anti-cancer drug that triggers cell death in various tumor types, may have clinical potential for some blood cancers including mantel cell lymphoma (MCL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to a recent clinical study.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Showing releases 1226-1250 out of 1427.

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