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Showing releases 1226-1236 out of 1236.

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Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Yoga regulates stress hormones and improves quality of life for women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy
For women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy, yoga offers unique benefits beyond fighting fatigue, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: William Fitzgerald
wbfitzgerald@mdanderson.org
713-792-9518
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
BPA linked to prostate cancer, study shows
Findings by Cincinnati Cancer Center researchers show that levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in men's urine could be a marker of prostate cancer and that low levels of BPA exposure can cause cellular changes in both non-malignant and malignant prostate cells.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, University of Cincinnati

Contact: Katie Pence
katie.pence@uc.edu
513-558-4561
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Gut microbes spur development of bowel cancer
It is not only genetics that predispose to bowel cancer; microbes living in the gut help drive the development of intestinal tumors, according to new research in mice.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Big stride in understanding PP1, the ubiquitous enzyme
The enzyme PP1 has a key role in many of the body's healthy functions and diseases. It's so generally important that drug developers dare not target it. In a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Brown University scientists report a big leap in understanding how PP1 interacts with other proteins to behave specifically in distinct situations. That could lead to medicines that target it for precise benefits.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 1-Mar-2014
Oncotarget
Improved screening means new targets for pediatric neuroblastoma therapies
Neuroblastoma is one of the most common and lethal types of childhood cancers. In a paper published online today in OncoTarget, a researcher at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio unveils an improved screening technique that shows the important role of microRNAs in regulating neuroblastoma development, pointing to new therapeutic possibilities.

Contact: Elizabeth Allen
allenea@uthscsa.edu
210-450-2020
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 28-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
BNI study reveal unexpected findings
Research on a deadly form of brain cancer co-authored by a physician at Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The three-year research project led locally by David Brachman, M.D., revealed that a 'promising' drug therapy failed to improve survival among patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lynne Reaves
lynne.reaves@dignityhealth.org
602-406-4734
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Feb-2014
FASEB Journal
Tackling tumors with space station research
Some tumors seem to be much less aggressive in space compared to their behavior on Earth, which could help scientists understand the mechanism involved and develop drugs targeting tumors that don't respond to current treatments.
German Space Agency

Contact: Laura Niles
Laura.E.Niles@nasa.gov
281-244-7069
NASA/Johnson Space Center

Public Release: 28-Feb-2014
American Journal of Transplantation
American Journal of Transplantation reports REGiMMUNE's transplant tolerance results
REGiMMUNE Corporation announced that the American Journal of Transplantation (AJT) has published its paper that describes a novel approach to long-term tolerance in organ transplantation with continuous administration of immune suppressants. "A Novel Approach Inducing Transplant Tolerance by Activated Invariant Natural Killer T Cells with Costimulatory Blockade" was published in the AJT March 2014 Issue 3, Volume 14, pages 554-567, and was first made available online as an early view on Feb. 6, 2014.

Contact: Debra Bannister
debracb77@gmail.com
530-676-7373
REGiMMUNE

Public Release: 28-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Long-term study confirms success of method for detecting spread of deadly skin cancer
Long-term research that was initiated at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center on lymphatic mapping and sentinel-node biopsy, techniques for detecting the earliest spread (metastasis) of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, has confirmed that these techniques significantly prolong patients' disease-free and melanoma-specific survival over the traditional observational "watch and wait" techniques.

Contact: Shaun Mason
smason@mednet.ucla.edu
310-206-2805
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 28-Feb-2014
Small
Let there be tissue-penetrating light: Scientists develop new nanoscale method to fight cancer
Researchers from the cancer nanotechnology and signal transduction and therapeutics programs of UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed an innovative technique that can carry chemotherapy safely and release it inside cancer cells when triggered by two-photon laser in the infrared red wave length.

Contact: Shaun Mason
smason@mednet.ucla.edu
310-206-2805
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 28-Feb-2014
European Urology
UCLA study finds robotic-assisted prostate surgery offers better cancer control
Robotic-assisted surgery for prostate cancer has fewer positive surgical margins than open surgery. Patients who had robotic surgery needed fewer additional cancer treatments afterward. Higher upfront robotic costs may be offset by a reduction of additional cancer therapy costs after surgery due to better cancer control outcomes.

Contact: Shaun Mason
smason@mednet.ucla.edu
310-206-2805
University of California - Los Angeles

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