IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1226-1235 out of 1235.

<< < 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Deletion of FAT10 gene reduces body fat, slows down aging in mice
A single gene appears to play a crucial role in coordinating the immune system and metabolism, and deleting the gene in mice reduces body fat and extends lifespan, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University and Yale University School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andrea Grossman
617-636-3728
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Society of Interventional Radiology 39th Annual Scientific Meeting
Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Y-90 provides new, safe treatment for metastatic breast cancer
A minimally invasive treatment that delivers cancer-killing radiation directly to tumors shows promise in treating breast cancer that has spread to the liver when no other treatment options remain. The outpatient treatment, called yttrium-90 (Y-90) radioembolization, was safe and provided disease stabilization in 98.5 percent of the women's treated liver tumors.

Contact: Ellen Acconcia
eacconcia@sirweb.org
703-460-5582
Society of Interventional Radiology

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Society of Interventional Radiology 39th Annual Scientific Meeting
Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
New implant shows promise for painful osteoporotic spine fractures
Individuals suffering from spinal fractures -- caused by osteoporosis or weakened bones -- now have another option to reduce pain, restore function and improve quality of life, according to a study of 300 patients treated with a new type of vertebral augmentation. Results of a randomized, controlled multicenter trial on a new implant treatment for vertebral compression fractures are being reported for the first time at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 39th Annual Scientific Meeting.

Contact: Ellen Acconcia
eacconcia@sirweb.org
703-460-5582
Society of Interventional Radiology

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
p53 cuts off invading cancer cells
The tumor suppressor p53 does all it can to prevent oncogenes from transforming normal cells into tumor cells. Sometimes oncogenes manage to initiate tumor development in the presence of p53, but the tumor suppressor doesn't give up and focuses its efforts instead on limiting the tumor's ability to invade and metastasize. Researchers uncover one way that p53 acts to prevent cancer cell invasion.
National Research Foundation Singapore, Ministry of Education Singapore, and others

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology
Radiation therapy and cancer vaccines: Timing is everything
Combining radiation with immnotherapy can boost cancer killing. Now a team from Thomas Jefferson University has shown that the boost works best when the therapies are sequenced correctly.

Contact: Edyta Zielinska
edyta.zielinska@jefferson.edu
215-847-5884
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 23-Mar-2014
Nature
Leukemia caused by chromosome catastrophe
Researchers have found that people born with a rare abnormality of their chromosomes have a 2,700-fold increased risk of a rare childhood leukemia. In this abnormality, two specific chromosomes are fused together but become prone to catastrophic shattering.
Wellcome Trust, Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research Specialist Programme, FWO, European Research Council

Contact: Mary Clarke
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-95328
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 23-Mar-2014
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Mass. General study identifies path to safer drugs for heart disease, cancer
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may have found a way to solve a problem that has plagued a group of drugs called ligand-mimicking integrin inhibitors, which have the potential to treat conditions ranging from heart attacks to cancer metastasis.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 23-Mar-2014
Society of Gynecological Oncology 45th Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer
HPV eradicated by AHCC supplement, preclinical study suggests
HPV, human papilloma virus, was eradicated by AHCC, a Japanese mushroom extract, in vivo and in vitro, in preclinical research presented by Judith A. Smith, PharmD., at Society of Gynecological Oncology 45th Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Tampa. These data suggest AHCC can eliminate HPV infections and may have a role in the prevention of HPV-related cancers. A confirmatory pilot study in HPV+ women is underway at UTHealth Women's Center.

Contact: John Carney or Julie McQuain
JMPRmedia@aol.com
212-477-0472
JMPR Associates, Inc.

Public Release: 23-Mar-2014
Nature Methods
'MaMTH' advance: New technology sheds light on protein interactions
Scientists have a better way to study human proteins -- large molecules that are part of every cell in the body -- thanks to a new technology developed by University of Toronto researchers. The technology tracks a class of proteins called membrane proteins as they interact with other proteins to either maintain health or contribute to disease.
Ontario Genomics Institute, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Cancer Society

Contact: Jim Oldfield
jim.oldfield@utoronto.ca
416-946-8423
University of Toronto

Public Release: 23-Mar-2014
Nature Genetics
TGen-led study discovers genetic cause of rare type of ovarian cancer
The cause of a rare type of ovarian cancer that most often strikes girls and young women has been uncovered by an international research team led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute, according to a study published online today by the renowned scientific journal, Nature Genetics. The findings revealed a 'genetic superhighway' mutation in a gene found in the overwhelming majority of patients with small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type, or SCCOHT.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Showing releases 1226-1235 out of 1235.

<< < 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50

  Search News Releases

     

Featured Multimedia

 

EurekAlert!