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Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Internet users more likely to engage in cancer-preventive behaviors
Older men and women who used the internet were more likely to participate in screening for colorectal cancer, participate in physical activities, eat healthily, and smoke less, compared with those who did not use the internet, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
New biomarker may help guide treatment of melanoma patients
A functional biomarker that can predict whether BRAF-mutant melanomas respond to drugs targeting BRAF could help guide the treatment of patients with these cancers, according to results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19–23.
Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Rapid method to detect BRAF mutations in cancer tissue samples
A new diagnostic platform to detect BRAF mutations in melanoma and other cancer types is faster and more accurate compared with the standard method currently used in clinics, and this could help accelerate diagnosis and treatment, according to results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
Biocartis

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Investigational PARP inhibitor promising in BRCA-related cancers
An investigational new PARP inhibitor, BMN 673, is showing early responses in patients with heavily pretreated, advanced, BRCA-related cancers of the breast and ovary, according to phase I clinical trial results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
BioMarin Pharmaceutical

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Photomedicine and Laser Surgery
Light as medicine?
Scientists have known for years that certain wavelengths of light in certain doses can heal, but they are only now uncovering exactly how it works, thanks in large part to research cluster in Milwaukee.

Contact: Chukuka Enwemeka
enwemeka@uwm.edu
414-229-4712
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
New drug combinations may benefit patients with pancreatic cancer
Two drug combinations that simultaneously block two major signaling pathways downstream of the protein KRAS, which is aberrantly active in most pancreatic cancers, may provide a new treatment option for patients with this disease, according to preclinical results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
New nanopharmaceutical may help overcome resistance to certain anticancer drugs
The nanopharmaceutical drug CRLX101 is showing promise as a potential new treatment for cancers that develop resistance to antiangiogenic drugs and radiation therapy, according to clinical trial results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19–23.
Cerulean Pharma Inc.

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Cell Metabolism
Targeting cancer's sweet tooth
Ludwig researchers have elucidated a key mechanism by which cancer cells change how they metabolize glucose to generate the energy and raw materials required to sustain runaway growth. Published in the current issue of Cell Metabolism, the Ludwig Cancer Research study also reveals how the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma harnesses the mechanism to resist targeted therapies that should disrupt this capability -- known as the Warburg effect-- and suggests how such resistance might be overcome.

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Antibody-drug conjugate may provide new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients
Patients with pancreatic cancer may benefit from an investigational member of an emerging class of anticancer drugs called antibody-drug conjugates, according to preclinical results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
Takeda Pharmaceuticals International Co.

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Patients report doctors not telling them of overdiagnosis risk in screenings
A survey finds that most patients are not being told about the possibility of overdiagnosis and overtreatment as a result of cancer screenings, according to report in a research letter by Odette Wegwarth, Ph.D., and Gerd Gigerenzer, Ph.D., of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.

Contact: Odette Wegwarth
wegwarth@mpib-berlin.mpg.de
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Large prospective study finds long-term obesity is associated with poorer pancreatic cancer survival
New results from a prospective study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology show that patients with a body mass index in the obese range live on average two to three months less after a pancreatic cancer diagnosis, compared with healthy weight patients, even after adjusting for factors that are known to predict survival for patients with this disease, such as age and disease stage.

Contact: Kate Blackburn
kate.blackburn@asco.org
571-483-1379
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Oncogene
NUS scientists identify molecular switch that suppresses development of liver cancer
A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore has found that activating a family of small protein, known as Rho, could suppress liver malignancies. This is the first time that a research group has provided evidence to show that the signaling crosstalk between different protein switches has an influence on the development of cancer tissues. The findings pave the way for the development and application of therapeutics targeted at liver cancer.

Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Blood
For first time, drug developed based on zebrafish studies passes Phase I clinical trial
Zebrafish research achieved a significant milestone when the first drug developed through studies utilizing the tiny animal and then put into clinical trials passed a Phase 1 trial aimed at establishing its safety. The drug, discovered in the laboratory of Leonard Zon, M.D., at Boston Children's Hospital, has already advanced to Phase II studies designed to determine its efficacy. Results of the safety trial were reported recently in the journal Blood.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and others

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-7379
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
International Journal of Nanomedicine
Study identifies safe delivery system for tricky yet potent anti-cancer cancer compound
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a way to effectively deliver staurosporine, a powerful anti-cancer compound that has vexed researchers for more than 30 years due to its instability in the blood and toxic nature in both healthy and cancerous cells.
National Institutes of Health, Tuttleman Family Foundation

Contact: Jackie Carr
jcarr@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A natural boost for MRI scans
Using an innocuous agent that is already naturally produced in the body, EPFL researchers have developed a breakthrough method that can make contrast-enhanced MRI safer and cheaper.
Swiss National Science Foundation, National Competence Center for Biomedical Imaging, CIBM, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Université de Lausanne, University of Geneva, HUG, Fondation Louis-Jeantet, and others

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
Journal of Oncology Practice
Recommendations for clinical trial accrual published in Journal of Oncology Practice
Recommendations for overcoming issues related to cancer clinical trial accrual were published in Journal of Oncology Practice. Following an NCI and ASCO co-sponsored symposium, the research team summarized best practices and strategies aimed at advancing cancer trials. "Cancer clinical trials provide the evidence base for new advances in oncology. However, only a few percent of cancer patients participate in them," says Neal Meropol, MD, UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Society of Clinical Oncology

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
216-844-5158
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Potential new drug for some patients with treatment-resistant lung cancer
The investigational drug AZD9291, a third-generation EGFR inhibitor, showed promise in preclinical studies and provides hope for patients with advanced lung cancers that have become resistant to existing EGFR inhibitors, according to results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
AstraZeneca

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Targeted investigational therapy potential to overcome crizotinib resistance in lung cancers
PF-06463922, an investigational drug being developed by Pfizer Inc., has the potential to become a new treatment option for patients who have lung cancer harboring abnormalities in the ALK gene, according to preclinical results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
Pfizer Inc.

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
New idea for targeting the common cancer protein KRAS
Patients with cancers driven by the protein KRAS, which are particularly hard to treat, may benefit from small molecules that attach to and disrupt the function of a KRAS-containing protein complex, according to results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Oct. 19-23.
Ann Melly Scholarship in Oncology, Vanderbilt University, National Institutes of Health, Lustgarten Foundation

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Potential new drug effective in breast cancer and melanoma resistant to targeted therapies
LEE011, a small-molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 being developed by Novartis Oncology, showed promising results in drug-resistant melanoma and drug-resistant breast cancer when tested in combination with other targeted therapies, and based on these preclinical results, several phase I clinical trials were launched recently, according to results presented here at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held October 19-23.
Novartis

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
Inherited gene variation tied to high-risk pediatric leukemia and greater risk of relapse
Research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has linked an inherited gene variation to a nearly four-fold increased risk of developing a pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia subtype that is associated with a poor outcome.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
media@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Radiotherapy & Oncology
Shining the soothing light
Low-level laser therapy reduces the occurrence of oral mucositis, known as the common canker sore, and improves quality of life in head and neck squamous cell cancer patients.
National Cancer Institute in Brazil

Contact: Heliton Spindola Antunes
hspindola@inca.gov.br
55-213-207-6597
Publicase Comunicação Científica

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Materials
Cells' 'molecular muscles' help them sense and respond to their environments
Johns Hopkins researchers used suction to learn that individual "molecular muscles" within cells respond to different types of force, a finding that may explain how cells "feel" the environment and appropriately adapt their shapes and activities. A computer model the researchers developed also lets them predict what a cell will do in response to altered levels of those "muscles," a common occurrence in a variety of cancers.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Nature Cell Biology
'Random' cell movement is directed from within
Johns Hopkins cell biologists have teased apart two integral components of the machinery that causes cells to move. Their discovery shows that cellular projections, which act as hands to help cells "crawl" both randomly and directionally, are apparently always initiated by message-relaying proteins inside the cell. It was already known that this occurred in directional movement but they now know that in random movement the messenger network is also causative because it can self-activate spontaneously.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2013
Genome Biology
UCLA scientist uncovers biological clock able to measure age of most human tissues
A UCLA study is the first to identify a biological clock able to gauge the age of most human tissues. Some parts of the body, like a woman's breasts, age faster than the rest.

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

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