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Showing releases 126-150 out of 1230.

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Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Non-invasive imaging instead of repeated biopsy in active monitoring of prostate cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study being presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014 describes a novel method to 'manipulate the lipid metabolism in the cancer cell to trick them to use more radiolabeled glucose, the basis of PET scanning.'

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
BJU International
Circumcision could prevent prostate cancer... if it's performed after the age of 35
Researchers at the University of Montreal and the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Institut-Armand-Frappier have shown that men circumcised after the age of 35 were 45 percent less at risk of later developing prostate cancer than uncircumcised men.
Cancer Research Society, Ministère du Développement économique, de l'Innovation et de l'Exportation, Fonds de recherche du Québec Santé

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-566-3813
University of Montreal

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Amino acid fingerprints revealed in new study
Stuart Lindsay and his colleagues at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute have taken a major step toward the sequencing of proteins, demonstrating the accurate identification of amino acids, by briefly pinning each in a narrow junction between a pair of flanking electrodes and measuring a characteristic chain of current spikes passing through successive amino acid molecules.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Scientists find potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors
Researchers studying a rare, always fatal brain tumor in children have found several molecular alterations that drive the cancer, according to a new study from scientists at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and McGill University. The findings identify potential new targets for drug treatments. The new research -- published April 6 in Nature Genetics -- could help physicians choose targeted agents with a better chance of combating pediatric high-grade astrocytomas.
National Institutes of Health, others

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-7379
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Medicine
Blood test could provide rapid, accurate method of detecting solid cancers
A blood sample could one day be enough to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of cancer in a patient's body and responses to treatment. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a way to quickly bring the technique to the clinic.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Six months hormone therapy in addition to radiotherapy improves prostate cancer survival
Men with prostate cancer that is small and confined to the prostate gland but that is at risk of growing and spreading, do better if they are treated with radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy, which lowers their levels of the male hormone, testosterone, according to new research to be presented at the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology in Vienna. The findings are expected to change clinical practice.
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Foundation, AstraZeneca

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Increased risk of developing lung cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer
Women who have radiotherapy for breast cancer have a small but significantly increased risk of subsequently developing a primary lung tumor, and now research has shown that this risk increases with the amount of radiation absorbed by the tissue. The research will be presented at the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO33) in Vienna.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
2014 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting
Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR technology highlighted at the 2014 AACR Annual Meeting
Cancer researchers will showcase new applications of Droplet Digital PCR, including its ability to track mutant DNA in liquid biopsies, and a faster, more cost-effective version for quantifying genetic aberrations.

Contact: Ken Li
kli@chempetitive.com
312-532-4675
Chempetitive Group

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Zombie cancer cells eat themselves to live
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Cell Reports and presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Conference 2014 shows that the cellular process of autophagy in which cells 'eat' parts of themselves in times of stress may allow cancer cells to recover and divide rather than die when faced with chemotherapies.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Prognosis of tumors positive for human papilloma virus in head and neck cancers varies according to the site
Researchers have shown for the first time that human papilloma virus status appears to have no prognostic effect on the outcome of primary radiotherapy in head and neck cancer outside the oropharynx (the part of the throat located behind the mouth), and should not be treated with the less intensive treatment strategies that are currently being investigated in clinical trials for HPV+ oropharyngeal tumors.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Helium ions may provide superior, better-targeted treatment in pediatric radiotherapy
For the first time, researchers have been able to demonstrate that the use of helium ions in radiation therapy could provide accurate treatment to tumors while helping to spare healthy organs.
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Recurrent head and neck tumors have gene mutations that could be vulnerable to cancer drug
An examination of the genetic landscape of head and neck cancers indicates that while metastatic and primary tumor cells share similar mutations, recurrent disease is associated with gene alterations that could be exquisitely sensitive to an existing cancer drug. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and Yale University School of Medicine will share their findings during a mini-symposium Sunday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach
The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment, according to a multidisciplinary team led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The results recently were published in Cancer Research and will be expanded upon on Tuesday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.
Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Pennsylvania Deptartment of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Disease-free survival estimates for ovarian cancer improve over time
The probability of staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients who already have been disease-free for a period of time, and time elapsed since remission should be taken into account when making follow-up care decisions, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The findings will be presented Wednesday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
New test developed to detect men at high risk of prostate cancer recurrence
A new genetic 'signature' to identify prostate cancer patients who are at high risk of their cancer recurring after surgery or radiotherapy has been developed by researchers in Canada, the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology in Vienna will hear on Saturday. The test should help doctors identity men who might benefit from additional treatments.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Brachytherapy helps maintain erectile function in prostate cancer patients without compromising treatment outcomes
The use of permanent brachytherapy, a procedure where radioactive sources are placed inside the prostate, into or near to the tumor, preserves erectile function in approximately 50 percent of patients with prostate cancer. Brachytherapy used alone is as effective as other established therapies for localized low to intermediate risk prostate cancer.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Plant-derived anti-cancer compounds explained at national conference
Compounds derived from plant-based sources -- including garlic, broccoli and medicine plants -- confer protective effects against breast cancer, explain researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with the UPMC CancerCenter. In multiple presentations Sunday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014, UPCI scientists will update the cancer research community on their National Cancer Institute-funded findings, including new discoveries about the mechanisms by which the plant-derived compounds work.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Journal of National Cancer Institute
Major genetic study links liver disease gene to bladder cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (with related research being presented this weekend at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Conference 2014) details the discovery of a new genetic driver of bladder cancer: silencing of the gene AGL.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Bacterial gut biome may guide colon cancer progression
At the 2014 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in San Diego, researchers from the Wistar Institute present findings that suggest that gut bacteria can change the microenvironment in a way that promotes the growth and spread of tumors. Their results suggest that bacterial virulence proteins may suppress DNA repair proteins within the epithelial cells that line the colon.

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@wistar.org
215-898-3943
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Antioxidants can protect against omega 6 damage -- or promote it
Given omega 6 fatty acid's reputation for promoting cancer -- at least in animal studies -- researchers are examining the role that antioxidants play in blocking the harmful effects of this culprit, found in many cooking oils. After all, antioxidants are supposed to prevent DNA damage. But employing antioxidants could backfire, say researchers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Nowhere to hide: Kids, once protected, now influenced by tobacco marketing
New study finds teenagers and young adults are exposed and influenced by direct mail and web coupons from tobacco manufacturers. This direct marketing exposure is translating to increased nicotine use.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
International consortium discovers 2 genes that modulate risk of breast and ovarian cancer
The paper has been authored by 200 researchers from 55 research groups from around the world and describes two new genes that influence the risk of women developing breast and ovarian cancer when they are carriers of BCRA1 and BCRA2 mutations.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Screening reveals additional link between endometriosis and ovarian cancer
Some women with endometriosis, a chronic inflammatory disease, are predisposed to ovarian cancer, and a genetic screening might someday help reveal which women are most at risk, according to a University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) study, in partnership with Magee-Womens Research Institute (MWRI). Monday at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, UPCI and MWRI researchers will present the preliminary results of the first comprehensive immune gene profile exploring endometriosis and cancer.
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Combining cell replication blocker with common cancer drug kills resistant tumor cells
Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter, have found that an agent that inhibits mitochondrial division can overcome tumor cell resistance to a commonly used cancer drug, and that the combination of the two induces rapid and synergistic cell death. Separately, neither had an effect. These findings will be presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Genetic testing beneficial in melanoma treatment
Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments so that patients with melanoma have the best chance of beating it, according to the results of a clinical trial by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The trial, funded by the National Institutes of Health, will be presented Monday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1230.

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