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Showing releases 126-150 out of 1289.

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Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Palliative care viewed as a stigma, despite improving quality of life
The term palliative care carries a stigma for patients and their caregivers, who regard it as synonymous with impending death. Education, and possibly a name change, will be necessary to be able to integrate palliative care into routine advanced cancer care, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Taipei Veterans General Hospital

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Palliative care study exposes stigma, calls for rebranding
An ingrained stigma attached to the label 'palliative care' among cancer patients, families and healthcare providers impedes earlier access to supportive care that improves quality of life, shows new research from Princess Margaret Cancer Centre published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
Canadian Cancer Society, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, Rose Family Chair in Supportive Care, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation

Contact: Jane Finlayson
jane.finlayson@uhn.ca
416-946-2846
University Health Network

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Three years and counting on atezolizumab for stage 4 CRC patient, Rodney Bearfoot
A symposium presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 offers updated results on the ongoing phase 1b clinical trial of anti-PDL1 immunotherapy atezolizumab in advanced stage colorectal cancer patients. Treated at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, one of the earliest trial participants is Rodney Bearfoot, who remains on trial with stable disease three years after being diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
AACR: Breast cancer stem cells radicalize normal neighbors for purpose of metastasis
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 shows that stem-like breast cancer cells secrete molecules that allow neighboring, otherwise anchored cells to metastasize.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research
Preeminent experts provide roadmap for future melanoma research
Recently the Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF) convened a summit of internationally-renowned melanoma experts for an in-depth discussion on the current understanding of, and future recommendations for, melanoma research.
Melanoma Research Foundation

Contact: Lauren Smith Dyer
202-742-5918
Wiley

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New HPV vaccine could curb cervical cancers and health costs if adopted widely
A Yale-led study finds that a new vaccine for human papillomavirus would significantly reduce both cervical cancer incidence and healthcare costs if states coordinated policies to improve coverage.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Ziba Kashef
ziba.kashef@yale.edu
203-436-9317
Yale University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Penn Medicine presents evidence showing new drug combination may improve outcomes for women with advanced breast cancer when administered before surgery
Results from the I-SPY 2 trial show that giving patients with HER2-positive invasive breast cancer a combination of the drugs trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) and pertuzumab before surgery was more beneficial than the combination of paclitaxel plus trastuzumab. Previous studies have shown that a combination of T-DM1 and pertuzumab is safe and effective against advanced, metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer, but in the new results, investigators tested whether the combination would also be effective if given earlier in the course of treatment.

Contact: Stephen Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Metastasis-promoting circulating tumor cell clusters pass through capillary-sized vessels
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have found that circulating tumor cell clusters -- which are more efficient in spreading cancer throughout the body than are single CTCs -- can pass through capillary-sized blood vessels. Their findings contradict the widely-held belief that CTC clusters are too large to pass through capillaries and suggest potential strategies to reduce clusters' metastatic potential.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation, Live Like Bella Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Quantum

Contact: Noah Brown
nbrown9@partners.org
617-643-3907
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
AACR: Results from clinical trial of personalized cellular therapy in brain tumors
Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer known as glioblastoma were found to have an acceptable safety profile and successfully migrate to and infiltrate tumors, researchers from Penn Medicine and Harvard University reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Nature Cell Biology
Protein found to play key role in the spread of pancreatic cancer
Researchers from the University of Liverpool working with colleagues from around the globe have found an explanation for how pancreatic cancer spreads to the liver. These findings potentially hold the key to stopping this disease from spreading.
Medical Research Council, North West Cancer Research, National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Cancer Research UK, The Wellcome Trust, Royal Society, Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund

Contact: Simon Wood
simon.wood@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-8356
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
AACR: Life-preserver microbubbles float tumor cells for analysis
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 demonstrates the use of gas microbubbles to selectively attach to and float circulating tumor cells from blood samples, allowing analysis of the isolated cells.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Study shows how TRK-fusion lung cancer escapes LOXO-101, offering new treatment strategies
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 pinpoints ways that cancer cells evolve to resist the drug LOXO-101

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Study drug LOXO-101 shows tumor regression in varied cancers
A phase I study of the drug LOXO-101 appears to significantly reduce tumors in patients with varied types of genetically defined cancer, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 17-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
SPF30 sunscreens delay melanoma incidence in preclinical model
Application of sun protection factor 30 sunscreen prior to exposure to ultraviolet-B light delayed melanoma onset in a mouse model of the disease, according to data from a team at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. This data suggest that the mouse model can be used to identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents. Initial findings are being presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.
Pelotonia

Contact: Amanda Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research 2016 Annual Meeting
Engineering T cells to treat pancreatic cancer
Dr. Sunil Hingorani, a member of the Clinical Research and Public Health Sciences divisions at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, will present recent groundbreaking developments in treating pancreas cancer with engineered T-cells at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 in New Orleans on April 16.
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/University of Washington Cancer Consortium Cancer Center, Giles W. and Elise G. Mead Foundation, Safeway Foundation, Maryanne Tagney and David Jones, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Rhonda Curry
rcurry@fredhutch.org
206-240-6011
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
ELCC 2016 - European Lung Cancer Conference
Patients with EGFR expressing NSCLC benefit most from necitumumab added to chemotherapy
Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor expressing advanced squamous non-small-cell lung cancer benefit most from necitumumab added to gemcitabine and cisplatin chemotherapy, according to a subgroup analysis from the SQUIRE trial presented today at the European Lung Cancer Conference 2016 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Science Signaling
Researchers identify enzyme link between excessive heart muscle growth, cancer growth
UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells -- a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke.
National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, and the Comisión Nacional de Investigación Cientiffica y Tecnológica

Contact: Cathy Frisinger
cathy.frisinger@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Low fat diet helps postmenopausal women avoid deadly breast cancers
Women who stayed on a low fat diet for approximately eight years reduced their risk of death from invasive breast cancers and improved their survival rates.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Laura Mecoy
Lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Journal of Women's Health
Women of color -- what we know and don't know about their unique health challenges
Women of color face both racial and gender disparities in the incidence, onset, and outcomes of diseases as diverse as cancer, cardiovascular disease, HIV infection and age-related disability. The unique health challenges these disparities present are examined in an article published in Journal of Women's Health.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
ELCC 2016 - European Lung Cancer Conference
Plasma genotyping to predict treatment benefit in patients with NSCLC
The benefit of plasma genotyping to predict treatment benefit in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is confirmed in three studies presented today at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) 2016 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Preliminary study: Antibody therapy reduces cancer stem cells in multiple myeloma
An experimental antibody treatment decreased by half the number of cancer stem cells that drive the growth of tumors in nearly all patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow and bone tissue, according to results of a preliminary clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists.
MedImmune Inc

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research 2016 Annual Meeting
Fred Hutch research highlights at AACR Annual Meeting 2016
Below are brief summaries highlighting several presentations by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center scientists at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 in New Orleans from April 16-20. Each contains a link to the related embargoed Fred Hutch news release. For researcher bios, photos and more, please visit fredhutch.org/media.

Contact: Rhonda Curry
rcurry@fredhutch.org
206-240-6011
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
First-ever nivolumab study to treat aggressive anal cancer appears promising
A rare malignancy known as squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) is on the increase, and now researchers have reported results of the first-ever phase II clinical trial results for treatment with the immunotherapy drug nivolumab.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital research at AACR Annual Meeting
The American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting features the work of St. Jude researchers.

Contact: Frannie Marmorstein
media@stjude.org
901-595-0221
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016
Experimental drug guadecitabine found safe in patients with colorectal cancer
In a small, phase I clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say they show for the first time that the experimental drug guadecitabine (SGI-110) is safe in combination with the chemotherapy drug irinotecan and may overcome resistance to irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.
Astex Pharmaceuticals, Van Andel Research Institute SU2C/AACR Epigenetics Dream Team

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1289.

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