IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1255.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Prostate cancer patients surveyed 5 years after vessel-sparing RT report preserved sexual function
A comparison of five-year sexual function outcomes, as reported by patients treated with external beam radiotherapy versus combination external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy, indicates that the utilization of vessel-sparing radiation therapy makes cure possible without compromising long-term sexual function, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
New radiosurgery technology provides highly accurate treatment, greater patient comfort
A new stereotactic radiosurgery system provides the same or a higher level of accuracy in targeting cancer tumors -- but offers greater comfort to patients and the ability to treat multiple tumors at once -- when compared to other radiation therapy stereotactic systems, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The study will be presented today, Sept. 16, at ASTRO in San Francisco.
Varian and Henry Ford Hospital

Contact: Krista Hopson Boyer
khopson1@hfhs.org
313-874-7207
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Prostate cancer patients who receive hypofractionated RT report consistent QoL
Prostate cancer patients who received hypofractionated radiation therapy reported that their quality of life, as well as bladder and bowel function were at similar levels before and after radiation therapy, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
New gene research helps pinpoint prostate cancer risk
A consortia of research hubs around the world encompassing 150 researchers has analysed more than 10 million genetic markers in 80,000 men with prostate cancer.
National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia Project Grant, Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

Contact: Rose Trapnell
rose.trapnell@qut.edu.au
61-731-382-361
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Cancers
Epigenetic drugs: A hope to treat cancer resistance and reduce cancer relapse?
'Recent studies suggest that epigenetic modifications may contribute to the development of cancer progenitor cells that can induce drug resistance and the relapse of different types of cancer,' said Sibaji Sarkar, Ph.D., instructor of medicine at BUSM. Adult drug resistant cancer cells may contribute to this problem, and the authors discuss these and other cancer drug resistance mechanisms in their recent publication in the September issue of the journal Cancers.

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Lactation linked to reduced estrogen receptor-negative, triple-negative breast cancer risk
Women who have had children (parous women) appear to have an increased risk of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, the subtype that carries a higher mortality rate and is more common in women of African ancestry. A similar relationship was found for triple-negative breast cancer. However, the association between childbearing and increased risk of estrogen receptor-negative and triple-negative breast cancer was largely confined to the women who had never breastfed.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Focus on treatment costs, value: Less radiation for elderly women with early breast cancer
In a healthcare climate where the costs of treatment are increasingly weighed against potential benefit, a Yale study has found that radiation oncologists are using fewer or less-aggressive radiation procedures on elderly women with early-stage breast cancer. The findings are scheduled to be presented at the 56th annual conference of the American Society for Radiation Oncology in San Francisco.

Contact: Vicky Agnew
vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Cancer patients with malignant spinal cord compression have preserved mobility
Mobility is equally preserved in cancer patients suffering from malignant spinal cord compression who receive a single dose of 10 Gy of radiation therapy, compared to patients who receive five daily doses of 4 Gy of radiation therapy each, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Select group of stage IV lung cancer patients achieve long-term survival after aggressive treatments
A large, international analysis of patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer indicates that a patient's overall survival rate can be related to factors including the timing of when metastases develop and lymph node involvement, and that aggressive treatment for 'low-risk' patients leads to a five-year OS rate of 47.8 percent, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Single fraction RT as effective as multiple fraction RT for bone metastases
A prospective study that compared patient-reported outcomes of a broad set of cancer patients with bone metastases demonstrates that single fraction radiation therapy is equally as effective as multiple fraction radiation therapy when pain, function and quality of life are considered, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Chemotherapy and SABR consecutively may be promising treatment option for advanced pancreatic cancer
For patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the combination of chemotherapy and stereotactic ablative radiation may be a promising treatment option, ultimately allowing them to undergo surgery that may not otherwise be an option, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
NSCLC patients who never smoked or who quit smoking have lower risk of developing secondary cancers
Non-small cell lung cancer survivors who never smoked or who are former smokers at the time of diagnosis have a lower risk of developing secondary primary lung cancers compared to those who are current smokers, suggesting that increased tobacco exposure is associated with a higher risk of SPLC, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Long-term results of RTOG 0236 confirm good primary tumor control, positive 5-year survival rates
Patients with inoperable, early-stage lung cancer who receive stereotactic body radiation therapy have a five-year survival rate of 40 percent, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Gastroenterology
AGA releases new tool to help GIs evaluate and treat Crohn's disease
The treatment of Crohn's disease is evolving. To help gastroenterologists better identify and manage their Crohn's disease patients, the American Gastroenterological Association has created a clinical decision tool to guide gastroenterologists in their decision-making process, which is published in Gastroenterology.

Contact: Aimee Frank
media@gastro.org
301-941-2620
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
World Congress on Cancers of the Skin
Skin cancer risks higher for soldiers serving abroad
Soldiers deployed to tropical and sunny climates are coming home with increased risk factors for a threat far from the battlefield: skin cancer.

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Study adds to cancer-fighting promise of combined immunotherapy-radiation treatment
A study in mice implanted with breast and melanoma cancers adds to a growing body of evidence that highly focused radiation -- long thought to suppress immunity -- can actually help boost the immune system's fight against cancer when combined with a new kind of immune-enhancing drug.
American Association of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cancer and the immune system: A double-edged sword
During cancer development, tumor cells decorate their surfaces with sugar compounds called glycans that are different from those found on normal, healthy cells. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that sialic acids at the tips of these cancer cell glycans are capable of engaging with immune system cells and changing the latter's response to the tumor -- for good and bad.
Swiss National Science Foundation, Samuel and Ruth Engelberg Cancer Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Pathology
Predicting prostate cancer: Pitt-developed test identifies new methods for treatment
A genetic discovery out of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is leading to a highly accurate test for aggressive prostate cancer and identifies new avenues for treatment.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
T-bet tackles hepatitis
A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous hepatitis virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to researchers in Germany.
German Federal Ministry of Research, European Research Council

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer
A study being published online Sept. 15, 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology reports that men with a specific pattern of baldness at age 45 have a 40 percent increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer later in life, compared to men with no baldness at 45.

Contact: Kate Blackburn
kate.blackburn@asco.org
571-483-1379
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of the American College of Nutrition
A heart-felt need for dairy food
A daily small serve of dairy food may reduce the risk of heart disease or stroke, even in communities where such foods have not traditionally formed part of the diet according to new research.
National Health Research Institutes, National Defence Medical Centre in Taiwan

Contact: Glynis Smalley
glynis.smalley@monash.edu
61-408-027-848
Monash University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Cancer-fighting cocktail demonstrates promising results as treatment for advanced cervical cancer
Combining a standard chemotherapy drug with a second drug that stops cells from dividing improves both the survival and response rates for those with advanced cervical cancer, a new study by University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers finds.
Gynecologic Oncology Group

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
IU study: Combining epilepsy drug, morphine can result in less pain, lower opioid doses
Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control with fewer side effects. Moreover, the combination can reduce the dosage of the opioid needed to be effective, according to a team of pain researchers at Indiana University.
National Institutes of Health, Indiana Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Fund

Contact: Eric Schoch
eschoch@iu.edu
316-274-8205
Indiana University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
Researchers develop improved means of detecting mismatched DNA
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified a highly sensitive means of analyzing very tiny amounts of DNA. The discovery, they say, could increase the ability of forensic scientists to match genetic material in some criminal investigations. It could also prevent the need for a painful, invasive test given to transplant patients at risk of rejecting their donor organs and replace it with a blood test that reveals traces of donor DNA.
Sol Goldman Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Scientists identify the master regulator of cells' heat shock response
Heat shock proteins protect the molecules in all human and animal cells with factors that regulate their production and work as thermostats. Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere report for the first time that a protein called translation elongation factor eEF1A1 orchestrates the entire process of the heart shock response.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1255.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

EurekAlert!