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Showing releases 126-150 out of 1295.

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Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New mouse-human modeling system enables study of disease development in vivo
Whitehead Institute researchers have created a new mouse-human modeling system that could be used to study neural crest development as well as the modeling of a variety of neural crest related diseases, including such cancers as melanoma and neurofibromatosis. Mouse-human chimeras would fill an important gap in disease research, as existing models do not accurately mimic key disease processes, including solid tumor initiation and progression, and are of little value for studying diseases with long latencies, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
Department of Defense, Simons Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Tobacco Control
NYU research: Secondhand smoke hazardous to hookah bar workers
Workers at New York City hookah bars are inhaling hazardous levels of carbon monoxide and nicotine while at work, signaling yet another breach by their employers of New York City's anti-smoking bylaws.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: christopher james
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Afatinib shows clinical benefit for lung cancer patients with brain metastases
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with common epidermal growth factor (EGFR) mutations and brain metastases showed improved progression-free survival (PFS) and response from the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) afatinib compared to standard platinum doublet chemotherapy.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
Jeff.Wolf@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Nano Letters
Microscopic drug 'depots' boost efficacy against tumors in animal model
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a technique for creating microscopic 'depots' for trapping drugs inside cancer tumors. In an animal model, these drug depots were 10 times more effective at shrinking tumors than the use of the same drugs without the depots.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Cancer
1 in 7 colorectal cancer patients diagnosed before recommended screening age
Nearly 15 percent of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were younger than 50, the age at which screening recommendations begin.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Breast Cancer Research
Breast cancer survivors could be vulnerable to common viral and bacterial infections
Breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy could be lacking sufficient antibodies to protect against common illnesses, as chemotherapy reduces the body's immune response, according to research published in the open access journal Breast Cancer Research. This work raises the possibility that these survivors could benefit from additional post-treatment monitoring. Further work is required to assess if revaccination would be beneficial.

Contact: Alanna Orpen
alanna.orpen@biomedcentral.com
BioMed Central

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Annals of Internal Medicine
ACP issues advice for evaluating blood in the urine as a sign of cancer
In a paper published today in Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians issued High Value Care advice for the evaluation of blood in the urine, or hematuria, as a sign of urinary tract cancer and to help physicians make decisions about referral of patients for urological assessment.

Contact: Steve Majewski
SMajewski@mail.acponline.org
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Annals of Internal Medicine
ACP advice for evaluating blood in the urine as a sign of cancer
In a paper published in Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians issued advice for the evaluation of blood in the urine, or hematuria, as a sign of urinary tract cancer and to help physicians make decisions about referral of patients for urological assessment.

Contact: Cara Graeff
cgraeff@acponline.org
215-351-2513
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Cancer
Many colorectal cancer patients are younger than the recommended screening age
In a recent analysis of US data, one in seven colorectal patients was younger than 50 years old, the recommended age to begin screening. Younger patients were more likely to be diagnosed with advanced stage disease; however, they received more aggressive therapy and lived longer without a cancer recurrence, suggesting some compensation for their later diagnosis.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
New study creates first 3-D vision of cancer target
'This basic research set the grounds for structure-based drug design approaches that could be beneficial for cancer treatments,' says Dr. Cyril Dominguez, University of Leicester.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Dr. Cyril Dominguez
cd180@le.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Cancer Research
Hacking the programs of cancer stem cells
Liang Fang and colleagues from Walter Birchmeier's group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, Germany, together with colleagues, have discovered a molecule that interrupts biochemical signals essential for the survival of a certain type of cancer stem cell. The work is published ahead of print in the online edition of Cancer Research.

Contact: Josef Zens
josef.zens@mdc-berlin.de
49-309-406-2118
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Clinical Cancer Research
New mechanism of antitumor action identified
In an article published in Clinical Cancer Research, a team of researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Ability Pharmaceuticals describes a new mechanism of anti-tumor action, discovered during the development of the drug ABTL0812. This drug, which is currently being tested in patients with advanced cancer, enhances the anti-tumor effect of standard chemotherapies, showing low toxicity and high tolerability.

Contact: Maria Jesus Delgado
MariaJesus.Delgado@uab.cat
34-935-814-049
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Thyroid
Experts debate benefits and challenges of new ATA guidelines & differentiated thyroid cancer
In a stimulating new Roundtable Discussion, a distinguished panel of leading physicians and clinical researchers highlight the key changes, new topics, and areas of ongoing controversy in the "2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer." The Roundtable Discussion (http://register.liebertpub.com/thyroidroundtable/) and the ATA's 2015 Management Guidelines (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.0020) are available free to download on the website of Thyroid.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists synthesize nanoparticles that can deliver tumor suppressors to damaged livers
UT Southwestern Medical Center chemists have successfully used synthetic nanoparticles to deliver tumor-suppressing therapies to diseased livers with cancer, an important hurdle scientists have been struggling to conquer.
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, Welch Foundation, American Cancer Society, Mary Kay Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Pollack Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology
Childhood cancer survivors face increased risk of metabolic syndrome
A new study of metabolic health risk factors in childhood cancer survivors showed increased risk for modifiable factors such as hypertension and overweight/obesity. These factors have been linked to the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy and are key contributors to the metabolic syndrome, which increases a patient's risk for cardiovascular disease, as described in an article in Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (JAYAO).

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
eLife
Crouching protein, hidden enzyme
A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the University of California (UC), Berkeley shows how a crucial molecular enzyme starts in a tucked-in somersault position and flips out when it encounters the right target.
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, Pew Scholars program, NIH, Searle Scholars Program, NSF CAREER Program, HHMI and a NSF Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Study finds smartphones may decrease sedentary time, increase activity
A pilot study finds that using smartphone reminders to prompt people to get moving may help reduce sedentary behavior. The study was supported by the American Cancer Society, with technical expertise provided by the e-Health Technology Program at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. The study appears in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.
American Cancer Society, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and others

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Developmental Cell
Gene often lost in childhood cancer crucial in cells' life or death decision
A gene that is often lost in childhood cancer plays an important role in the decision between life and death of certain cells, according to a new study published in the journal Developmental Cell. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Ludwig Cancer Research in Sweden have discovered the process by which that gene, KIF1B-β, kills cells and thereby suppresses tumour development.
Ludwig Cancer Research, Swedish Children Cancer Foundation, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Cancer Society

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Nature Immunology
Potential therapeutic targets identified for multiple sclerosis
Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other inflammatory diseases may benefit by new findings from a study that identified potential therapeutic targets for a devastating disease striking some 2.3 million people worldwide.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
eLife
Optogenetic technology developed at UMMS uses light to trigger immunotherapy
A new optogenetic technology developed by scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Texas A&M Health Science Center Institute of Biosciences & Technology, called optogenetic immunomodulation, is capable of turning on immune cells to attack melanoma tumors in mice. Using near-infrared light, researchers have shown they can selectively activate an immune response by controlling the flow of calcium ions into the cell.

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-579-2934
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 22-Jan-2016
Pediatric Blood and Cancer
Study shows inferior outcomes for African-American pediatric lymphoma patients
Researchers from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (Sylvester) today published a study showing that African-American pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma patients have inferior overall survival to their white and Hispanic peers. The findings, published in the journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer, are the largest study yet on racial and ethnic disparity in the pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma population.

Contact: Patrick Bartosch
patrick.bartosch@med.miami.edu
305-243-8219
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Jan-2016
Genes and Development
Tumor-suppressing gene restrains mobile elements that can lead to genomic instability
The most commonly mutated gene in cancer, p53, works to prevent tumor formation by keeping mobile elements in check that otherwise lead to genomic instability, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.

Contact: Debbie Bolles
debbie.bolles@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2016
Genome Research
A defense protein that causes cancer
Cancer is caused by the growth of an abnormal cell which harbours DNA mutations. A few years ago, scientists have identified an important mutagen which lies in our own cells: APOBEC, a protein that usually functions as protecting agent against viral infection. Today, a team led by Sergey Nikolaev, geneticist at the University of Geneva, has deciphered how APOBEC takes advantage of a weakness in our DNA replication process to induce mutations in our genome.

Contact: Serguey Nikolaev
Sergey.Nikolaev@unige.ch
41-223-795-695
Université de Genève

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Cell Reports
UT Southwestern study shows how certain drugs alter metabolism of pancreatic cancer cells
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found that cancer drugs known as CDK4/6-inhibitors alter the metabolism of pancreatic cancer cells, revealing a biologic vulnerability that could be exploited for therapeutic gain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debbie Bolles
debbie.bolles@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
2016 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium
Study shows different genetic drivers of colorectal cancer in older and younger patients
University of Colorado Cancer Center study being presented Saturday at the 2016 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium shows 141 genes that are enriched in colorectal cancer samples from younger patients and a largely different cohort of 42 genes enriched in samples from older patients, implying new treatment strategies for the young form of the disease.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Showing releases 126-150 out of 1295.

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