IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1346.

<< < 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Women with luminal A subtype of breast cancer did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy
Premenopausal women whose invasive breast cancers were of the luminal A subtype had comparable 10-year disease-free survival rates regardless of whether or not they received adjuvant chemotherapy, according to data from the phase III DBCG77B clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, IM Daehnfeldt Foundation, Danish Research Council

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Capecitabine improved outcomes for breast cancer patients with disease after presurgery chemo
Treatment with the chemotherapy agent capecitabine increased disease-free survival for women with HER2-negative breast cancer that was not eliminated by presurgery chemotherapy, according to results from the phase III CREATE-X clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
Specified Nonprofit Corporation - Advanced Clinical Research Organization

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Drugs prevent heart damage during breast cancer treatment, study shows
Clinical trial shows heart medications prevent damage during chemotherapy for patients with breast cancer.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Alberta Cancer Foundation

Contact: Bryan Alary
bryan.alary@ualberta.ca
780-492-0336
University of Alberta

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Building the foundations for cancer genomic analysis for research and clinical diagnostics
A study published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications revealed a high degree of heterogeneity in how cancer genome sequencing is done at different institutions across the globe. This result lays the foundation for the coming era of cancer genomics by creating guidelines and providing new tools for achieving higher quality data, for better diagnosis and precision medicine.

Contact: Christopher Needles
christopher.needles@oicr.on.ca
416-673-8505
Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Pathologic complete response to presurgery chemo improves survival for patients with TNBC
Patients with stage 2 or stage 3 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who had a pathologic complete response (pCR) after presurgery chemotherapy had increased event-free and overall survival compared with those who had more than minimal residual invasive disease at surgery following presurgery chemotherapy, according to results from the randomized phase II CALGB/Alliance 40603 clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
NIH/National Cancer Institute's Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, Genentech, Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Denosumab improves disease-free survival for postmenopausal patients w HR+ breast cancer
Adding denosumab to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy improved disease-free survival for postmenopausal patients with early-stage, hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, according to results from the phase III ABCSG-18 clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
Amgen

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Scientific presentations at SABCS15 highlight new data on myRisk Hereditary Cancer test
Myriad will highlight three scientific presentations related to its myRisk Hereditary Cancer test at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Dec. 8-12. The data being presented include results from studies that advance the understanding of hereditary cancer testing using multi-gene panels to evaluate patients at risk for or diagnosed with breast cancer.

Contact: Ron Rogers
rrogers@myriad.com
908-285-9248
Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Bone cancer researchers discover how to block, potentially treat osteosarcoma
Scientists at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have discovered that blocking the master regulator of bone renewal stops osteosarcoma -- the most common primary bone cancer in children and teens, and the malignant disease that was fatal for Canadian icon Terry Fox.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Global Leadership Round in Genomics and Life Sciences, Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation

Contact: Jane Finlayson
jane.finlayson@uhn.ca
416-946-2846
University Health Network

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
Cancer Research
Imaging test detects aggressive and treatment-resistant cancers
Scientists have developed a new imaging test that could enable doctors to identify more dangerous tumors before they spread around the body -- and tailor treatment accordingly. Teams at The University of Manchester and The Institute of Cancer Research, London describe detailed development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to map areas of oxygen deprivation within tumors.
Cancer Research UK, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
44-207-153-5582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Adding carboplatin to presurgery chemo improved disease-free survival for patients with TNBC
Adding carboplatin to presurgery chemotherapy improved disease-free survival for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), according to results from the randomized phase II GeparSixto clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.
GlaxoSmithKline, Roche, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
267-250-5441
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Nature
Textbooks on cells should be rewritten
Ground-breaking new Danish research has shown that the current scientific description of the human cell cycle needs to be revised. These findings could also lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches to target an Achilles' heel in different types of cancers.

Contact: Professor Ian.D.Hickson
iandh@sund.ku.dk
0045-51-29-78-77
University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Annals of Oncology
Five out of six women at higher risk reject drugs to prevent breast cancer
Cancer Research UK scientists have found that five in six women with increased risk of breast cancer turn down drugs likely to prevent the disease.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Fiona Dennehy
fiona.dennehy@cancer.org.uk
020-346-96770
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
SABCS15: 'Weeding the garden' with radiation while continuing breast cancer therapy
An ongoing phase IIR/III clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium seeks to answer an important question in the treatment of early metastatic breast cancer: Should surgery or stereotactic body radiation be used to 'weed the garden' of a few sites of metastasis while continuing treatment that may still be controlling the initial tumor?

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Counseling with genetic cancer screening may increase knowledge and decrease anxiety
Many BRCA 1/2-negative patients choose to proceed with comprehensive testing for genetic mutations that increase cancer risk, and when presented with counseling before and after testing, most make informed decisions and experience decreased levels of anxiety, according to new research.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-776-6063
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Study links body fat, weight loss, and chromosome length in breast cancer patients
It is well documented that a healthy diet and exercise are key in cancer prevention and management, but the exact mechanism hasn't been clear. Now, Yale Cancer Center researchers have found an explanation in the tiny protective ends of chromosomes called telomeres. The findings will be presented Dec. 11 at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
American Institute for Cancer Research, Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Vicky Agnew
Vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
One-two punch of palbociclib and paclitaxel shows promise against advanced breast cancer
Combining the new breast cancer drug palbociclib with paclitaxel (Taxol) shrank tumors in nearly half of patient with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer, according to new research. The results will be presented Saturday at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (Abstract P6-13-08). A second study (Abstract P4-13-04), to be presented Friday provides new clues to how breast cancer develops resistance to the palbociclib, a common occurrence among many patients who take the drug.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-776-6063
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Aspirin use does not improve outcomes for cancer patients, but may lower breast density
Aspirin does not appear to be protective or associated with improved clinical outcomes or survival among breast cancer patients with aggressive disease, the researchers of one study report. However, another study suggests aspirin may in fact help reduce breast tissue density, which could lead to earlier detection of some breast cancers.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-776-6063
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
PLOS ONE
Endangered foxes on Catalina Island get promising treatment to reduce ear tumors
Roughly half of Santa Catalina Island foxes were found to have ear canal tumors, but an ear mite treatment appears to be greatly helping the problem, according to two studies from the University of California, Davis.
Morris Animal Foundation, Institute for Wildlife Studies, Catalina Island Conservancy, US Navy and The Nature Conservancy

Contact: Winston Vickers
twvickers@ucdavis.edu
949-929-8643
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Loss of enzyme promotes tumor progression in endometrial cancer
Scientists have shown for the first time why loss of the enzyme CD73 in human cancer promotes tumor progression.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Phase 1 results point to larger trial of enzalutamide and fulvestrant in breast cancer
At San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Jennifer Richer, PhD, and colleagues report promising results of a phase 1 clinical trial of combination enzalutamide and fulvestrant against advanced breast cancer.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Dark matter' in cancer genome prompts immune response
Researchers say the immune response comes from RNA with pathogen-like features.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Research Institute

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Multiple myeloma patient study shows promise for natural killer cells
A first-in-human Phase I study of multiple myeloma patients combined expanded cord blood-derived natural killer cells with transplantation of a patient's own stem cells and high-dose chemotherapy with little or none of the side effects seen with current treatments.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Mount Sinai researchers present results at American Society of Hematology Meeting
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers will present several landmark studies at the 2015 American Society of Hematology meeting Dec. 5-8, 2015, in Orlando, including data analysis of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma that revealed insight into key biological processes and deeper understanding of cellular systems and disease mechanisms, and two combination therapy strategies that showed high response rates in patients with difficult-to-treat myeloma.

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Cancer Research
Obesity contributes to metastasis in ovarian cancer patients
The influence of obesity on ovarian cancer metastasis had not been evaluated. Researchers from the University of Notre Dame and its affiliated Harper Cancer Research Institute unveil important new insights into the relationship between ovarian cancer and obesity.

Contact: Sharon Stack
Sharon.Stack.11@nd.edu
574-631-2518
University of Notre Dame

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Current Biology
Researchers find molecular shift that stops stem cells in Drosophila from making tumors
University of Oregon scientists studying neural stem cells in the fruit fly Drosophila have uncovered a molecular change experienced by stem cells as they age. During development of the central nervous system, a protein is expressed that blocks tumor formation.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1346.

<< < 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

EurekAlert!