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Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1314.

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Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Benefits persist in T cell therapy for children with relapsed leukemia
An innovative cell therapy against a highly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia continues to show highly promising results in children treated in a pilot study. Ninety-two percent of the 39 children receiving bioengineered T cells had no evidence of cancer at one month after treatment, with this complete response persisting in some cases for more than two years. The personalized cell therapy reprograms a patient's immune system and offers the potential of long-term success.

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman
Salis@email.chop.edu
267-970-3685
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Circulating RNA may provide prognostic tool for multiple myeloma
The 'molecular mail' sent by multiple myeloma cells provides clues to how well patients with the disease are likely to respond to treatment, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5665
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Positive study data could improve standard of care for Hodgkin lymphoma patients
In a late-stage clinical trial, Hodgkin lymphoma patients who received brentuximab vedotin post-transplant lived longer without disease progression than patients who received only supportive care.

Contact: Andrea Baird
bairda@mskcc.org
908-307-9255
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Immunotherapy achieves breakthrough result in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma
Eighty-seven percent of Hodgkin lymphoma patients who participated in an early-phase immunotherapy clinical trial experienced cancer remission.
Bristol Myers Squibb, National Institutes of Health, Miller Family Fund

Contact: Teresa M. Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Studies show immunotherapy drugs improve outcomes in Hodgkin lymphoma patients
In recent years, a number of scientific breakthroughs have led to the development of drugs that unleash the power of the immune system to recognize and attack cancer. For Classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients, two phase I studies are already demonstrating dramatic results.

Contact: Andrea Baird
bairda@mskcc.org
908-307-9255
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 6-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Unprecedented benefit seen in test of three-drug treatment for multiple myeloma
In the treatment of multiple myeloma, the addition of carfilzomib to a currently accepted two-drug combination produced significantly better results than using the two drugs alone, according to a worldwide research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic.
Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Contact: Joe Dangor
dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu
651-261-9089
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
American Society for Cell Biology/International Federation for Cell Biology
Screening for matrix effect in leukemia subtypes could sharpen chemotherapy targeting
Jae-Won Shin and David Mooney of Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering in Cambridge, MA, describe building a three-dimensional hydrogel system with tunable stiffness to see how relative stiffness of the surrounding ECM affected the resistance of human myeloid leukemias to chemotherapeutic drugs.

Contact: John Fleischman
jfleischman@ascb.org
513-706-0212
American Society for Cell Biology

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Agent prevents prostate cancer growth and spread in animal studies
Researchers have completed a critical step in the journey from a basic science discovery in the lab to a potential clinical application by showing an experimental agent prevents tumor growth and spread in mice with prostate cancer harboring a common chromosomal abnormality. The agent, YK-4-279, is the first drug targeted at the chromosomal translocations found in about half of prostate cancer cells.
US Department of Defense

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Euro Echo Imaging 2014
Austrian researchers show encapsulation of cancer drugs reduces heart damage
Austrian researchers have shown that a new technique which wraps chemotherapy drugs in a fatty cover -- called a liposome -- reduces heart damage, in a study presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014.

Contact: Jacqueline Partarrieu
press@escardio.org
33-492-948-627
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
American Society for Cell Biology/International Federation for Cell Biology
An unholy alliance -- Colon cancer cells in situ co-opt fibroblasts in surrounding tissue to break out
In work to be presented at the ASCB/IFCB meeting in Philadelphia, researchers from the Institut Curie in Paris report that they have evidence of a coordinated attack on the basement membrane of human colon cells by cancer cells in situ and CAF cells in the extracellular matrix that begins long before the actual translocation of cancer cells.

Contact: John Fleischman
jfleischman@fuse.net
513-706-0212
American Society for Cell Biology

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
IRCM researchers identify a protein that controls the 'guardian of the genome'
A new study published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences sheds new light on a well-known mechanism required for the immune response. Researchers at the IRCM, led by Tarik Möröy, Ph.D., identified a protein that controls the activity of the p53 tumor suppressor protein known as the 'guardian of the genome.'
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canada Research Chairs Program, Cole Foundation

Contact: Julie Langelier
julie.langelier@ircm.qc.ca
514-987-5555
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montreal

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Promising compound rapidly eliminates malaria parasite
An international research collaborative has determined that a promising anti-malarial compound tricks the immune system to rapidly destroy red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite but leave healthy cells unharmed. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears in the current online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NIH/National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Medicines for Malaria Venture, Australian National Health

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Cell Reports
New signaling role for key protein may contribute to wound healing, tumor growth
A key protein may represent a new way to use the immune system to speed healing and counter inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune diseases, according to study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the December issue of Cell Reports.
National Institute of Health, CLIP Award/Cancer Research Institute

Contact: Lucia Lee
lucia@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Archives of Disease in Childhood
Boosting length of breastfeeding could save NHS more than £40 million every year
Doubling the number of mums who breastfeed for 7-18 months in their lifetime and helping others to continue for at least four months could save the National Health Service more than £40 million every year, suggests research published online in Archives of Disease in Childhood.
Unicef UK

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Smoking and higher mortality in men
In a new study, published in Science, researchers at Uppsala University demonstrate an association between smoking and loss of the Y chromosome in blood cells. The researchers have previously shown that loss of the Y chromosome is linked to cancer. Since only men have the Y chromosome, these results might explain why smoking is a greater risk factor for cancer among men and, in the broader perspective, also why men in general have a shorter life expectancy.

Contact: Lars Forsberg
lars.forsberg@igp.uu.se
46-707-401-775
Uppsala University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Approved breast cancer drug offers hope for the treatment of blood disorders
A new study provides an explanation as to why blood cancers are more common in men than in women, revealing that estrogens regulate the survival of stem cells that give rise to blood cancers. Moreover, findings in mice with blood neoplasms suggest that a drug called tamoxifen, which targets estrogen receptors and is approved for treatment of breast cancer, may also be a valuable strategy for blocking the development of blood neoplasms in humans.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Heart
Cons of regular low-dose aspirin to stave off serious illness in women outweigh pros
The pros of giving healthy women regular low-dose aspirin to stave off serious illness, such as cancer and heart disease, are outweighed by the cons, suggests a large study published online in the journal Heart.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Female sex hormones can protect against the development of some blood disorders
Estrogens, a major class of female sex hormone, can regulate the activity of the hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and in this way influence the development of some types of leukemia. This is the conclusion of a new study led by researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares and published in the latest edition of the journal Cell Stem Cell.

Contact: Ainhoa Iriberri
airiberri@cnic.es
34-610-295-556
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Mini chromosomes that strengthen tumors
Cancers are due to genetic aberrations in certain cells that gain the ability to divide indefinitely. This proliferation of sick cells generates tumors, which gradually invade healthy tissue. Therefore, current therapies essentially seek to destroy cancer cells to stop their proliferation.

Contact: Federico Santoni
federico.santoni@unige.ch
022-379-5719
Université de Genève

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Frontiers in Immunology
Predicting the storm: Can computer models improve stem cell transplantation?
Is the human immune system similar to the weather, a seemingly random yet dynamical system that can be modeled based on past conditions to predict future states? Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center's award-winning Bone Marrow Transplant Program believe it is.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Archives of Disease in Childhood
Breastfeeding for longer could save the NHS £40 million a year
The NHS could save more than £40 million a year by increasing the length of time that mothers breastfeed, according to research carried out at Brunel University London.

Contact: Keith Coles
keith.coles@brunel.ac.uk
Brunel University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Chemistry and Biology
A poisonous cure
Take two poisonous mushrooms, and call me in the morning. While no doctor would ever write this prescription, toxic fungi may hold the secrets to tackling deadly diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
More evidence for impact of lung cancer targeted therapy from practice-changing trial
An international study involving Manchester researchers has found that for previously untreated lung cancer patients with a particular genetic change, a new targeted therapy is better than standard chemotherapy.

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-58383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Study: How red wine prevents cancer
'Alcohol damages cells and resveratrol kills damaged cells,' says Robert Sclafani, Ph.D., investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
European Urology
Common prostate cancer treatment associated with decreased survival in older men
A common prostate cancer therapy should not be used in men whose cancer has not spread beyond the prostate, according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. The findings are particularly important for men with longer life expectancies because the therapy exposes them to more adverse side effects, and it is associated with increased risk of death and deprives men of the opportunity for a cure by other methods.
Vattikuti Urology Institute

Contact: Dwight Angell
dwight.angell@hfhs.org
313-876-8709
Henry Ford Health System

Showing releases 1251-1275 out of 1314.

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