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Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
Does ethnicity affect breast cancer biology?
Although breast cancer is somewhat more aggressive in South Asian and Black women than in White women, this is largely due to age differences between ethnic groups in the UK, according to new research presented at the 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC10). The findings suggest that inherent differences in tumor biology between the ethnic groups are unlikely to play a role.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
Cancer Research
Gene may worsen cancer outcome by speeding metabolism of drugs
Some patients with breast cancer, lung cancer and leukemia seem to fare poorly after treatment because of the effects of a particular gene, a new study finds. The gene, called CYP3A7, is normally only active in infancy, but in some people it continues to be switched on into adulthood, and over-activates their metabolism.
Breast Cancer Now, Bloodwise, Cancer Research UK

Contact: Claire Hastings
chastings@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35380
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
Major differences between male and female breast cancers uncovered but male patients still disadvantaged by lack of research, say investigators
Male breast cancer has important biological differences from female breast cancer, according to results from a study of 1203 tumor samples from male patients. Until now it has been assumed that male patients should be treated in the same way as females, but these results mean that this is not the case, and should help doctors make better treatment choices, say the research team.
Breast Cancer Research Foundation, European Breast Cancer Council, Dutch Pink Ribbon, Susan G. Komen Foundation

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
Science
Protein increases signals that protect cancer cells, Stanford study finds
Researchers have identified a link between the expression of a cancer-related gene and cell-surface molecules that protect tumors from the immune system.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
Lapatinib and trastuzumab shrinks HER2+ breast cancer in 11 days after diagnosis
Approximately one-quarter of women with HER2 positive breast cancer, who were treated with a combination of two targeted drugs before surgery and chemotherapy, saw their tumors shrink significantly or even disappear, according to results from the UK EPHOS-B clinical trial involving 257 women with newly-diagnosed, operable HER2 positive disease.
Cancer Research UK and GlaxoSmithKline, The Institute of Cancer Research and The University of Manchester/ University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
Oncotarget
Jefferson researchers find highly active gene in aggressive human lung cancer
Scientists believe that 'conserved' genes -- those found in life forms that range from bacteria to plants, insects and humans -- perform vital biological functions across species. And limited research on one of those genes, Nitrilase 1 (Nit1), suggested it acts to inhibit cancer development.

Contact: Colleen Cordaro
colleen.cordaro@jefferson.edu
215-955-2238
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
'Dose-dense' chemo for premenopausal breast cancer patients improves survival
Premenopausal women with breast cancer have a better chance of survival if they are given cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy closer together, every two weeks rather than every three weeks. Furthermore, this regime does not increase the risk of early menopause, according to results of a meta-analysis of trials involving over 3,000 patients presented at the 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC10) in Amsterdam.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Screening with tomosynthesis or ultrasound detects more cancers in dense breasts
In women with dense breasts, adding either tomosynthesis (a form of 3-D mammography) or ultrasound scans to standard mammograms can detect breast cancers that would have been missed, according to results from the ASTOUND trial of over 3,000 women carried out by researchers in Italy and Australia. The research is presented at the 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC10) in Amsterdam.
Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro and the University of Genoa, National Breast Cancer Foundation/Australia Breast Cancer Research Leadership Fellowship

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
Oncotarget
Research identifies first step in design of new anti-cancer drugs
New research has identified a first step in the design of a new generation of anti-cancer drugs that include an agent to inhibit resistance to their effectiveness.

Contact: Martin Herrema
M.J.Herrema@kent.ac.uk
University of Kent

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
Full dose radiotherapy to whole breast may not be needed in early breast cancer
Five years after breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy focused around the tumor bed is as good at preventing recurrence as irradiating the whole breast, with fewer side effects, researchers from the UK have found in the large IMPORT LOW trial.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
PLOS Computational Biology
'Big data' drills down into metabolic details
Rice University bioengineers have introduced a fast computational method to model tissue-specific metabolic pathways that may help find new therapeutic targets for cancer and other diseases.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
Current Cancer Drug Targets
Delivery strategies of chemotherapy to the central nervous system
The blood-brain barrier and the blood-tumor barrier remain great obstacles to the drug delivery to brain tumors. This paper reviews the importance of BBB and BTB and the current status and future perspectives of these delivery procedures.

Contact: Faizan ul Haq
faizan@benthamscience.org
Bentham Science Publishers

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Small peptides attack ovarian cancer on 2 fronts, research shows
Two forms of a peptide derived from a naturally-occurring human protein can force tumors to shrink significantly in an animal model of metastatic ovarian cancer, according to a team led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital's Vascular Biology Program, the University of Bergen and Weill Cornell Medical College.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Norwegian Cancer Society, Cornell Center on the Microenvironment and Metastasis, Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Medical Research Foundation, Honorable Tina Brozman Foundation, Robert I. Goldman Foundation, and others

Contact: Erin Tornatore
erin.tornatore@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
New breast cancer genetic mutation found in Chinese population and will help refine screening and target drug development
A genetic mutation that appears to be associated with a high breast cancer risk has been identified by researchers from Hong Kong. It is likely to be important enough to be included in genetic screening for people of Chinese origin with a family history of breast cancer, they say.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
Diabetes treatment can reduce mammographic density
A large study of women in Denmark has found that the use of diabetes treatment decreases mammographic density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer, whereas taking insulin increases density. This is the first time that data on the effect of diabetes treatment and insulin use on breast cancer have been studied.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
The 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10)
Physical activity does not influence breast density: Protective effect against breast cancer is due to other mechanisms
Danish researchers have found no link between physical activity and breast density, and believe that the protective effect of physical activity on breast cancer must be through other mechanisms. This finding is unexpected because it was believed that reducing BMI and fatty tissue would increase breast density.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Surprisingly long learning curve for surgeons operating on oesophageal cancer
According to a major Swedish cohort study from researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Imperial College London, a surgeon who operates on oesophageal cancer must have performed 60 operations to prevent any lack of experience adversely affecting the long-term survival of the patients.
The Swedish Research Council, Swedish Cancer Society

Contact: KI Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-085-248-6077
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Open Biology
Cell insights shed light on everyday process of renewal and repair
Scientists have gained insights into the fundamental process of cell division, by identifying key steps that ensure cells divide correctly as they undergo repair and growth.
Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK, and European Commission

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Developmental Cell
Mount Sinai researchers report insights into blood stem cells from engineered stem cells
Building upon previous work, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a precursor cell in the placenta and embryo of mice that can be matured in the lab to make hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Cancer Research
Nothing to sneeze at -- battling mucus to beat cancer
What do cancer cells and a runny nose have in common? Researchers at the University of Oklahoma say the answer may hold the key to making cancer treatment better. They have discovered a new gene target -- a chink in pancreatic cancer's defensive armor. Their discovery may point to new targeted therapies and a way to help make current treatments for this deadly cancer more effective.
OU Health Sciences Center/College of Medicine Alumni Association Fund, Kerley-Cade Endowed Fund

Contact: Theresa Green
theresa-green@ouhsc.edu
405-833-9824
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Nature Genetics
Skin cancer teams up with Sonic the Hedgehog
An international team of scientists including researchers from the Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia) studied what mutations are responsible for formation of the most common skin cancer type. The results of the study were published in Nature Genetics.

Contact: Vladimir Koryagin
science-release@rector.msu.ru
Lomonosov Moscow State University

Public Release: 7-Mar-2016
eLife
Study: Cancer cells eat their neighbors' 'words'
Cancer cells are well-known as voracious energy consumers, but even veteran cancer-metabolism researcher Deepak Nagrath was surprised by their latest exploit: Experiments in his lab at Rice University show that some cancer cells get 30-60 percent of their fuel from eating their neighbors' 'words.'
Rice University/Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology-John and Ann Doerr Fund for Computational Biomedicine

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 7-Mar-2016
Current Biotechnology
Drug-loaded nanocarriers in tumor targeted drug delivery
Nanoparticulate delivery systems in cancer therapies provide better penetration of therapeutic and diagnostic substances with the cancerous tissue in comparison to conventional cancer therapies.

Contact: Faizan ul Haq
faizan@benthamscience.org
Bentham Science Publishers

Public Release: 7-Mar-2016
Cancer Research
New therapeutic target in myeloma discovered
A new study by researchers at the Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has shown that targeting both CDK4 and ARK5, proteins responsible for maintaining energy balance within the cell, was extremely effective in causing cell death in myeloma,
The Chemotherapy Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Mar-2016
Current Cancer Drug Targets
Towards the goal of precision therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma
Hepatocellular carcinoma is a highly lethal disease, therefore effective and tolerable treatment is urgently needed.

Contact: Faizan ul Haq
faizan@benthamscience.org
Bentham Science Publishers

Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1380.

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