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Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1345.

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Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Regenstrief and IU study: Mindfulness-based stress reduction diminishes chemo brain
Participation in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program yields robust and sustained improvement in cancer-related cognitive impairment, a prevalent and potentially debilitating condition that affects attention, memory and executive function in survivors, according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine.
Walther Cancer Foundation, Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Cancer study identifies genes that stop onset of leukemia
Genes that act as brakes to stop the development of an aggressive form of leukemia have been identified by University of Edinburgh researchers. Their findings offer fresh insights into how to tackle the disease and could lead to new therapies that prevent relapses.

Contact: Jen Middleton
jen.middleton@ed.ac.uk
44-779-564-0662
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Leukemia patients who switched kinase inhibitors had favorable outcomes
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients who stopped taking the kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib or idelalisib, had mostly favorable outcomes when they switched to the alternate therapy.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
High response rates, long-term remissions in Penn trials of personalized cell therapy
Ninety-three percent of pediatric patients (55 of 59) with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia went into remission after receiving an investigational therapy made from their own immune cells, with continuous remissions of over one year in 18 patients and over two years in nine patients. In an emerging new use of the same therapy, known as CTL019, more than half of patients (15 of 28) with non-Hodgkin lymphoma also responded to infusions of the personalized cellular therapy.

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Testosterone-lowering therapy for prostate cancer may increase Alzheimer's risk
Men taking androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer were almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in the years that followed than those who didn't undergo the therapy, an analysis of medical records from two large hospital systems by Penn Medicine and Stanford University researchers has shown.
National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
New guideline addresses long-term needs of breast cancer survivors
A new breast cancer survivorship care guideline provides guidance to primary care and other clinicians in caring for the estimated 3.1 million female adult survivors of breast cancer in the United States.

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Cancer
Study identifies characteristics that may increase a breast cancer survivor's risk of developing leukemia following treatment
A new analysis indicates that certain characteristics may increase a breast cancer survivor's risk of developing leukemia after undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings are a first step toward finding ways to prevent this serious and potentially life-threatening treatment-related complication.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Common treatment for prostate cancer appears to double Alzheimer's risk
A review of the electronic medical records of thousands of prostate cancer patients at two major medical institutions revealed a nearly two-fold increase in the rate of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis among those treated with androgen deprivation therapy.

Contact: Jennie Dusheck
dusheck@stanford.edu
650-725-5376
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New England Journal of Medicine
Drug shows potential as safe and effective for most prevalent form of adult leukemia
Clinical results published in the OnLine First edition of New England Journal of Medicine show that the new drug acalabrutinib (ACP-196) promotes high response rates that are durable in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) while producing minimal side effects.
Four Winds Foundation, D. Warren Brown Foundation, The Sullivan Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Thomas, Al and Midge Lipkin, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Amanda J Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Studies highlight new drug targets or compounds for acute myeloid leukemia
Preclinical data unveiled across four studies presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology highlight potential treatment opportunities for acute myeloid leukemia, a blood cancer accounting for approximately 20 percent of all childhood leukemias and 32 percent of adult leukemias. The four studies represent significant progress in seeking out and targeting multiple vulnerabilities within AML cells, including aspects of the cells' metabolism, internal communications and ability to transport proteins between different compartments.

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Experimental drug is first targeted therapy to improve survival in high-risk AML patients
Midostaurin added to standard chemotherapy is the first targeted treatment to improve survival of a high-risk, genetically defined subgroup of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, reported Dr. Richard Stone, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, on behalf of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology group, in a plenary session at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in Orlando.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Experimental drug is first targeted therapy to improve survival in high-risk AML patients
Midostaurin added to standard chemotherapy is the first targeted treatment to improve survival of a high-risk, genetically defined subgroup of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, reported Dr. Richard Stone, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, on behalf of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology group, in a plenary session at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in Orlando.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Nature Chemical Biology
Stanford engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution
Through evolution, DNA mutations generate more effective proteins. Humans have found many uses for these molecules -- as foods, industrial enzymes, anti-cancer drugs -- and scientists want to understand how to engineer better protein variants. Now Stanford engineers invented a technology, described in Nature Chemical Biology, which accelerates protein evolution for this purpose. It allows researchers to test millions of variants of a protein, choose the best one and determine the DNA sequence that creates it.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition
Young adults with ALL have encouraging survival with pediatric regimen
Using a pediatric chemotherapy regimen to treat young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) significantly improved their outcomes compared to what has historically been achieved with 'adult' treatment protocols, report Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
ACS Nano
Tiny drug-laden 'popping bubbles' lead triple attack treatment for liver cancer
In an interdisciplinary collaboration between prominent academic and industry investigators, researchers have discovered a novel method for repositioning an FDA-approved anti-cancer compound so it can specifically target liver cancer tumors. A 'triple attack' technique combining chemotherapy, thermal ablation, and hyperthermia provided a highly targeted, yet minimally invasive approach.

Contact: Dipanjan Pan
dipanjan@illinois.edu
217-244-2938
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition
Three studies point to effectiveness of new therapies for multiple myeloma
Results of clinical trials show that new drug combinations can significantly extend the time in which multiple myeloma is kept in check in patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant forms of the disease

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New technology may standardize sickle cell disease screening for infants
Researchers from Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented new research findings this weekend at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. The team presented promising findings related to new technology aimed at facilitating early detection of sickle cell disease for infants in developing countries.

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
1st tool to assess impact of co-illnesses in young cancer patients
A team of researchers from LSU Health New Orleans Schools of Public Health and Medicine and colleagues have developed the first index identifying and documenting concurrent but unrelated diseases among adolescents and young adults with cancer in collaboration with the NCI. Called the AYA HOPE Comorbidity Index, it's a tool that permits measurement of the impact of other medical conditions on health care services needs and the general health status of these young cancer patients.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 6-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New vaccine strategy better protects high-risk cancer patients from flu
Yale Cancer Center researchers have developed a vaccine strategy that reduces the risk of flu infections in cancer patients at highest risk for influenza. The findings were presented Dec. 6 at the 57th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in Orlando, Florida.
Arthur R. Sekerak Cancer Research Fund, Yale Cancer Center

Contact: Vicky Agnew
Vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 6-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Children with childhood leukemia benefit from prophylactic antibiotics
Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduce the risk of serious bacterial infections in children during the critical first month of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer, according to a US and Canadian study led by investigators from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. While the overall cure rate for ALL is high, about one to two percent of children with this diagnosis die during the first month of therapy from treatment complications, primarily infection-related.

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-7379
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia mutations suggest new uses of existing cancer drugs
Mining the DNA of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients uncovered 12 mutations that may be targetable using therapies already available for other cancers, Penn Medicine researchers reported at the 57th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 6-Dec-2015
57th ASH Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Clinical trial results show new drug is better for CLL patients
Older adults with chronic lymphocytic leukemia may have an alternative to toxic chemotherapy as their first treatment, according to a national study to be reported online Dec. 6, 2015, in the New England Journal of Medicine and co-authored by a Wilmot Cancer Institute oncologist.
Pharmacyclics, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lydia Fernandez
lydia_fernandez@urmc.rochester.edu
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Dec-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Study shows ibrutinib superior to traditional chemotherapy in untreated chronic leukemia patients
A multi-center, international, randomized, Phase III study of older untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) demonstrated that ibrutinib, a kinase inhibitor, is significantly more effective than traditional chemotherapy with chlorambucil.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2015
Blood
Genetic variants tied to increased risk of bone complications in young leukemia patients
Research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has identified genetic variations in young leukemia patients that are associated with an increased incidence of osteonecrosis, a serious cancer treatment side effect.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, ALSAC

Contact: Frannie Marmorstein
media@stjude.org
901-595-0221
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 5-Dec-2015
The 57th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology
Triple drug combination beats standard treatment in myeloma trial
The addition of bortezomib to a standard two-drug regimen for myeloma patients significantly lengthened the time before their cancer returned, and significantly lengthened their lives, according to new clinical trial results announced today.
The National Cancer Iinstitute, Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., The Takeda Oncology Company, Celgene Corporation

Contact: Wendy Lawton
lawtonw@ohsu.edu
503-348-8677
SWOG

Showing releases 1276-1300 out of 1345.

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