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Showing releases 151-175 out of 1272.

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Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Cancer
Study shows clear new evidence for mind-body connection
For the first time, researchers have shown that practicing mindfulness meditation or being involved in a support group has a positive physical impact at the cellular level in breast cancer survivors.
Alberta Cancer Foundation, Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance

Contact: Gregory Harris
gregory.harris@albertahealthservices.ca
403-619-3108
Alberta Health Services

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Obesity a liability in cancer immunotherapy
Packing on the pounds may lead to dangerous inflammation in response to anti-cancer treatment. A University of California Davis study shows that overweight mice develop lethal inflammation in response to certain anti-cancer therapies, suggesting a possible link between body weight and adverse side effects.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Journal of Health Communication
Massey researchers develop the first cancer health literacy tool
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers have developed the first and only tool that can accurately measure cancer health literacy and quickly identify patients with limited CHL. This tool has the potential to improve communication and understanding between physicians and patients, which, in turn, could lead to better clinical outcomes.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: John J Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Immunotherapy for cancer toxic with obesity
Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Dorsey Griffith
dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Lung cancer diagnosed before it is detected by imaging
A team of researchers from Inserm led by Paul Hofman shows in the journal PLOS ONE, that it is possible to detect, in patients at risk of developing lung cancer, early signs, in the form of circulating cancer cells, several months, and in some cases several years, before the cancer becomes detectable by CT scanning. This warning could play a key role in early surgical intervention, thereby making it possible to attempt the early eradication of the primary cancer site.

Contact: Paul Hofman
hofman@unice.fr
33-617-012-754
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Swallowing a sponge on a string could replace endoscopy as pre-cancer test
Swallowing a sponge on a string could replace traditional endoscopy as an equally effective but less invasive way of diagnosing a condition that can be a forerunner of esophageal cancer.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Greg Jones
greg.jones@cancer.org.uk
44-015-170-74643
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Lancet Haematology
New classification improves risk prediction in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
If chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with a good or poor prognosis could be identified already at the time of diagnosis, physicians would have better possibilities to adjust their therapeutic and follow-up strategies. Now researchers at Uppsala University, together with international colleagues, have discovered a new correlation between specific molecular features of the disease and subgroups of patients with different prognosis.

Contact: Richard Rosenquist Brandell
Richard.rosenquist@igp.uu.se
46-184-714-831
Uppsala University

Public Release: 2-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Improving imaging of cancerous tissues by reversing time
Lihong Wang, Ph.D., the Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science is applying a novel time-reversal technology that allows researchers to better focus light in tissue, such as muscles and organs.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie Flory
julie.flory@wustl.edu
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 2-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Sea sponge drug could boost advanced breast cancer survival by 5 extra months
The cancer drug eribulin, originally developed from sea sponges, could give women with advanced triple negative breast cancer an average of five extra months of life, according to research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference in Liverpool Monday.

Contact: Greg Jones
greg.jones@cancer.org.uk
07-050-264-059
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 2-Nov-2014
Nature Genetics
Mutant models
Using mathematical toolkits traditionally considered the property of statistical physics and artificial intelligence, researchers have developed a way to identify important cancer mutations. This approach can model the effects that cancer mutations have on the intricate patterns of communication between groups of proteins involved in cell signaling. The model shows how mutations can alter signaling networks and points the way to a better understanding of cancer genomes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 1-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
'Invisible tattoos' could improve body confidence after breast cancer radiotherapy
Invisible tattoos could replace the permanent dark ink tattoos used to deliver breast cancer radiotherapy according to an NCRI Cancer Conference study.
National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and The Institute of Cancer Research

Contact: Paul Thorne
paul.thorne@cancer.org.uk
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 1-Nov-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Step towards blood test for many cancer types
Scientists have identified more than 800 markers in the blood of cancer patients that could help lead to a single blood test for early detection of many types of cancer in future, according to research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference in Liverpool Sunday.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Stephanie McClellan
stephanie.mcclellan@cancer.org.uk
44-020-346-95314
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Synthetic lethality offers a new approach to kill tumor cells, explains Moffitt researcher
The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. Alan F. List, M.D., president and CEO of Moffitt Cancer Center, co-authored an article on synthetic lethality featured in the Oct. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Cancer cell fingerprints in the blood may speed up childhood cancer diagnosis
Newly-identified cancer cell fingerprints in the blood could one day help doctors diagnose a range of children's cancers faster and more accurately, according to research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference next week.

Contact: Emily Head
emily.head@cancer.org.uk
020-346-96189
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference
Scientists trigger self-destruct switch in lung cancer cells
Cancer Research UK scientists have found a drug combination that can trigger the self-destruct process in lung cancer cells -- paving the way for new treatments.

Contact: Emily Head
emily.head@cancer.org.uk
020-346-96189
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Cell division, minus the cells
Researchers have reconstituted cell division -- complete with signals that direct molecular traffic -- without the cell. Combining frog-egg extracts with lipid membranes that mimic the membrane of the cell, they built a cell-free system that recapitulates how the cleavage furrow is assembled.
National Institutes of Health, Marine Biological Laboratory/Evans Foundation

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Cancer Research
Viewing cancer on the move: New device yields close-up look at metastasis
Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths.
Johns Hopkins University Institute for NanoBioTechnology, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Phil Sneiderman
prs@jhu.edu
443-997-9907
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Interface
Decoding the emergence of metastatic cancer stem cells
In the first study of its kind, Rice University researchers have mapped how information flows through the genetic circuits that cause cancer cells to become metastatic. The research reveals a common pattern in the decision-making that allows cancer cells to both migrate and form new tumors.
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, National Science Foundation, Tauber Family Funds

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
54th Annual Conference of the Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group
Proton therapy shown to be less costly than some alternative radiotherapy techniques
In terms of duration of treatment and cost, patients with early stage breast cancer may benefit from accelerated partial breast irradiation with proton therapy versus whole breast irradiation, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center.

Contact: Agata Porter
agata.porter@finnpartners.com
212-715-1595
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology
Medicare costs analysis indicates need to decrease use of biopsies as diagnosis tool for lung cancer
Biopsies were found to be the most costly tool prescribed in lung cancer diagnosis, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology
Molecular tumor markers could reveal new therapeutic targets for lung cancer treatment
Analysis of 607 small cell lung cancer lung tumors and neuroendocrine tumors identified common molecular markers among both groups that could reveal new therapeutic targets for patients with similar types of lung cancer, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology
Post-operative radiation therapy improves overall survival for patients with resected NSCLC
Patients who received post-operative radiation therapy, radiation therapy after surgery, lived an average of four months longer when compared to the patients who had the same disease site, tumor histology and treatment criteria and who did not receive post-operative radiation therapy, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Cell Metabolism
Unlocking the secrets of pulmonary hypertension
A UAlberta team has discovered that a protein that plays a critical role in metabolism, the process by which the cell generates energy from foods, is important for the development of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly disease.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, University Hospital Foundation, Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute

Contact: Ross Neitz
rneitz@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Molecular Cell
A matter of life and death: Cell death proteins key to fighting disease
Melbourne researchers have uncovered key steps involved in programmed cell death, offering new targets for the treatment of diseases including lupus, cancers and neurodegenerative diseases.
National Health and Medical Research Council, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Australian Research Council, Australian Cancer Research Foundation, Victorian Government

Contact: Alan Gill
gill.a@wehi.edu.au
61-393-452-719
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology
Sustained local control for medically inoperable, early stage lung cancer patients
Analysis of data from an institutional patient registry on stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) indicates excellent long-term, local control, 79 percent of tumors, for medically inoperable, early stage lung cancer patients treated with SBRT from 2003 to 2012, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Showing releases 151-175 out of 1272.

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