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Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Progression-free survival triples in select metastatic lung cancer patients with surgery or radiation after standard chemotherapy
Lung cancer patients with oliogometastases, defined as three or fewer sites of metastasis, may benefit from aggressive local therapy, surgery or radiation, after standard chemotherapy, according to research led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
832-264-8893
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Pembrolizumab elicits significant antitumor activity in head & neck cancer patients
Treating head and neck cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease with the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab resulted in significant clinical responses in a fifth of the patients from a phase II clinical trial.
Merck & Co.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Nature
Novel imaging model helps reveal new therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the most common of pancreatic cancers, is extraordinarily lethal, with a five-year survival rate of just 6 percent. In a new study, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, together with colleagues at Keio University, the University of Nebraska and Ionis Pharmaceuticals describe an innovative new model that not only allowed them to track drug resistance in vivo, but also revealed a new therapeutic target.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, UC San Diego Clinical and Translational Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, TMEN Tumor Microenvironment Network, and others

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Cancer drug trial success
The successful results of a University of Liverpool led drug trial aimed at developing new therapeutic approaches to cancer have been presented at two American medical conferences.

Contact: Nicola Frost
nicola.frost@liverpool.ac.uk
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Combo immunotherapy for advanced melanoma: Two therapies may be better than one
A new metastatic melanoma study suggests that a combination of two immunotherapies may be better than one. One treatment uses a patient's own T cells modified in the lab to more powerfully recognize and attack tumors; the other treatment, a 'checkpoint inhibitor,' releases the brakes on the body's natural immune system. The findings will appear in the June 6, 2016 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Sandy Van
svan2@fredhutch.org
808-526-1708
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Novel protein inhibitors engineered as alternative approach to potentially treat cancer
Researchers have engineered endogenous protein inhibitors of protein-degrading enzymes as an alternative approach to synthetic inhibitors for potentially treating cancer and other diseases. Pharmaceutical companies have previously investigated the possible use of synthetic MMP inhibitors for treating cancer and other diseases, but they failed in clinical trials due to side effects, most likely because they were insufficiently specific and inhibited MMPs needed for normal physiological processes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Targeting B-cell malignancies with κ-specific T cells can lead to complete clinical responses
Targeting the light chain expressed by malignant B cells killed tumor cells while sparing normal B cells expressing the other type of light chain.

Contact: Dipali Pathak
pathak@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Unexpected function of small nucleolar RNAs explains cause of some diseases
Scientists have discovered unexpected functions of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that explain the cause of some diseases. They found that snoRNAs not only modify ribosomes, but can also regulate alternative splicing. Through this second function, they regulate protein function and inhibit the generation of wrong protein variants. Thus, upon the loss of snoRNAs the formation of wrong protein variants can no longer be prevented, leading to diseases like Prader-Willi syndrome and several cancers.
American Heart Association, Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Spanish Government, Consolider RNAREG, Sandra Ibarra Foundation for Cancer, Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca, USA-Israel Bination

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Immunotherapy improves survival, quality of life in rapidly progressing head and neck cancer
Immunotherapy doubles overall survival and improves quality of life, with fewer side effects, in a treatment-resistant and rapidly progressing form of head and neck carcinoma, reports a large, randomized international trial co-led by investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. The new trial was considered so successful that it was stopped early to allow patients in the chemotherapy group to receive the new drug.
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Doctors unleash new weapon to fight pediatric neuroblastoma
After the first year of receiving the novel treatment combination, more than half of children with relapsed neuroblastoma saw either a complete or partial remission -- a 53 percent response rate compared to the typical 10 to 12 percent response rate.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Advanced cancer patients receive aggressive care at high rates at the end of life
A national health claims analysis of cancer patients who were younger than age 65 and had metastatic disease revealed that nearly two-thirds were admitted to the hospital or visited the emergency room in the last 30 days of their lives. The UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers who led the study also found that nearly a third of patients died in the hospital.

Contact: Bill Schaller
bill_schaller@med.unc.edu
617-233-5507
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Nivolumab shows promise in first-ever trial for patients with refractory, metastatic anal cancer
In the first-ever clinical trial for metastatic patients previously treated for the disease, research led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that the immune checkpoint blockade nivolumab shows promise for the majority of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA).

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
832-264-8893
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Nivolumab immunotherapy helps patients with advanced bladder cancer
The immune checkpoint blockade drug nivolumab reduced tumor burden in 24.4 percent of patients with metastatic bladder cancer, regardless of whether their tumors had a biomarker related to the drug's target, according to clinical trial results from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
832-264-8893
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
MD Anderson researchers highlight advances in gynecologic cancer treatments
Advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments are the centerpiece of key studies being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
832-264-8893
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
New drug 'retrains' immune system to fight aggressive bladder cancer
A new drug that harnesses the immune system to attack tumors is highly effective against advanced bladder cancer, according to the results of an international clinical trial to be presented June 5 at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting
Dual stem-cell transplant improves outlook for children with high-risk neuroblastoma
Children with high-risk neuroblastoma whose treatment included two autologous stem-cell transplants were more likely to be free of cancer three years later than patients who underwent a single transplant, a Phase 3 clinical trial has found, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The tandem transplant technique produced even better results when followed by treatment with immunotherapy agents.

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
LA BioMed researchers editorialize on new breast cancer study in NEJM
LA BioMed Researchers Rowan T. Chlebowski, MD, PhD, and Matthew J. Budoff, MD, said a new study of the long-term use of aromatase inhibitors to prevent the recurrence of certain types of breast cancer is 'reassuring.'

Contact: Laura Mecoy
Lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Immunotherapy effective against some types of sarcoma
An existing cancer immunotherapy drug reduces tumor size in some types of rare connective tissue cancers, called sarcomas, report researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. Additional analyses of tumor biopsies and blood samples, which will help the researchers better understand which sarcoma subtypes will benefit most from the new treatment, are underway.
Merck & Co., Sarcoma Alliance for Research Through Collaboration, Sarcoma Foundation of America, QuadW Foundation, Pittsburgh Cure Sarcoma

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 5-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting
Novel targeted drug shows promise against advanced small cell lung cancer
The experimental 'smart-bomb' drug rovalpituzumab tesirine (Rova-T) appears safe and shows efficacy in treating patients with advanced small cell lung cancer, according to results from a first-in-human clinical trial to be presented today by a Memorial Sloan Kettering researcher at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Contact: Caitlin Hool
hoolc@mskcc.org
646-227-3956
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 4-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Twice a day radiotherapy halves treatment time and is equally good at treating small cell lung cancer
HAVING radiotherapy once a day for six and a half weeks or twice a day for three weeks -- when combined with chemotherapy -- is equally good at treating small cell lung cancer that hasn't spread.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Emily Head
emily.head@cancer.org.uk
020-346-96189
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 4-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Rucaparib shows clinical benefit in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation
The targeted therapy rucaparib, which has demonstrated robust clinical activity in ovarian cancer patients with a BRCA mutation, also showed promise in previously treated pancreatic cancer patients with the mutation.
Clovis Oncology, Inc.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 4-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Moffitt: Radiation therapy with pembrolizumab, bevacizumab safe for glioma patients
Moffitt Cancer Center will present preliminary results from a phase 1 study testing whether the addition of pembrolizumab to radiation therapy and bevacizumab is safe and can control tumor growth for these patients.

Contact: Steve Blanchard
steve.blanchard@moffitt.org
813-745-1718
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 4-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
As colorectal cancer rate falls, diagnosis of late-stage cancer in young patients is up
University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2016 finds that in patients over 50, the rate of CRC is falling at 2.5 percent per year while the rate of CRC in patients under 50 is rising at 0.8 percent per year. The increase appeared to be driven mostly by an increase in late-stage CRC in the under-50 population with an increase of 2.4 percent per year from 2003 through 2013.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 4-Jun-2016
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting
Direct patient engagement through social media speeds recruitment to cancer research study
A crowd-sourcing strategy aimed at accelerating research into metastatic breast cancer has registered more than 2,000 patients from all 50 states in its first seven months, report researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting.

Contact: Teresa M Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5653
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 4-Jun-2016
JAMA Oncology
UTSW team find up to one-quarter of lung cancer patients ineligible for immunotherapy
A significant proportion of lung cancer patients also have autoimmune disease, which may make them unsuitable for increasingly popular immunotherapy treatments, a team of researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center has found.

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Showing releases 176-200 out of 1373.

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