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Showing releases 201-225 out of 1268.

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Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
American Journal of Gastroenterology
IU researchers: Blood test may help to diagnose pancreatic cancer
Indiana University cancer researchers have found that a simple blood test might help diagnose pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly forms of the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Schug
maschug@iupui.edu
317-278-0953
Indiana University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Cancer
Radiation exposure linked to aggressive thyroid cancers
For the first time, researchers have found that exposure to radioactive iodine is associated with more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer, according to a careful study of nearly 12,000 people in Belarus who were exposed when they were children or adolescents to fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Radiology
Screening with tomosynthesis and mammography is cost-effective
Adding tomosynthesis to biennial digital mammography screening for women with dense breasts is likely to improve breast cancer detection at a reasonable cost relative to biennial mammography screening alone, according to a new study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
New findings show that different brain tumors have the same origin
Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumors. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. Now researchers at Uppsala University have shown that one and the same cell of origin can give rise to different types of glioma. This is important for the basic understanding of how these tumors are formed and can contribute to the development of more efficient and specific glioma therapies.

Contact: Lene Uhrbom
lene.uhrbom@igp.uu.se
46-184-715-063
Uppsala University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Tea and citrus products could lower ovarian cancer risk, new UEA research finds
Tea and citrus fruits and juices are associated with a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to new research from the University of East Anglia. The team found that those who consumed food and drinks high in flavonols -- found in tea, red wine, apples and grapes -- and flavanones -- found in citrus fruit and juices -- were less likely to develop the disease.

Contact: Laura Potts
laura.potts@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-93007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
How cells know which way to go
Amoebas aren't the only cells that crawl: Movement is crucial to development, wound healing and immune response in animals, not to mention cancer metastasis. In two new studies from Johns Hopkins, researchers answer long-standing questions about how complex cells sense the chemical trails that show them where to go -- and the role of cells' internal 'skeleton' in responding to those cues.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Higher copayments are associated with discontinuation of aromatase inhibitors
Discontinuation and nonadherence were higher among breast cancer patients taking brand name aromatase inhibitors vs. generic AIs, according to a new study published Oct. 27 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Cancer
Chest radiation to treat childhood cancer increases patients' risk of breast cancer
A new study has found that patients who received chest radiation for Wilms tumor, a rare childhood cancer, face an increased risk of developing breast cancer later in life due to their radiation exposure.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
New prostate cancer screening guideline recommends not using PSA test
A new Canadian guideline recommends that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test should not be used to screen for prostate cancer based on evidence that shows an increased risk of harm and uncertain benefits. The guideline is published in CMAJ.

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons
Most Internet sources on prostate cancer disagree with expert panel's recommendation
Only 17 percent of top-ranked consumer health websites advise against screening for prostate cancer, a recommendation made more than two years ago by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, according to a study presented at the 2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Journal of National Cancer Institute
Generic medications boost adherence to breast cancer therapy
A study has found that the introduction of generic breast cancer drugs, which are less expensive than their brand-name counterparts, increased treatment adherence by 50 percent.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Cancer Research
Delivering a 1-2 punch: New drug combination shows promise in treating breast cancer
The uncontrolled growth of cancer cells arises from their ability to hijack the cell's normal growth program and checkpoints. Usually after therapy, a second cancer-signaling pathway opens after the primary one shuts down -- creating an escape route for the cancer cell to survive. The answer, say Case Western Reserve researchers, is to anticipate and block that back-up track by prescribing two drugs. The results of the project appeared this fall in the journal Cancer Research.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Analytical Methods
Prostate cancer, kidney disease detected in urine samples on the spot
New device screens for kidney disease, prostate cancer on the spot. The tiny tube is lined with DNA sequences that latch onto disease markers in urine. While healthy samples flow freely, a diseased sample gets clogged and stops short of the mark.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joe Hadfield
joe_hadfield@byu.edu
801-422-9206
Brigham Young University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Cancer Research
Study may explain why targeted drug doesn't benefit patients with early-stage lung cancer
The drug erlotinib is highly effective in treating advanced-stage lung cancer patients whose tumors have a particular gene mutation, but when the same drug is used for patients with early-stage tumors with the same gene change, they fare worse than if they took nothing. This study might explain why.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Eileen Scahill
Eileen.Scahill@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Cancer Epidemiology
Prostate cancer risk reduced by sleeping with many women, but increased with many men
Compared to men who have had only one partner during their lifetime, having sex with more than 20 women is associated with a 28 percent lower risk of one day being diagnosed with prostate cancer. However, having more than 20 male partners in one's lifetime is associated with a twofold higher risk of getting prostate cancer compared to those who have never slept with a man.
Canadian Cancer Society, Cancer Research Society, Fonds de recherche du Québec—Santé, Ministère du Développement économique, de l'Innovation et de l'Exportation du Québec

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-566-3813
University of Montreal

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Cell Biology
A switch to dampen malignancy
Ludwig Oxford researchers have discovered a key mechanism that governs how cells of the epithelia, the soft lining of inner body cavities, shift between a rigid, highly structured and immobile state and a flexible and motile form.
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Medical Research Council UK

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Genetics
Unsuspected gene found frequently mutated in colorectal, endometrial cancers
Scientists say they have identified in about 20 percent of colorectal and endometrial cancers a genetic mutation that had been overlooked in recent large, comprehensive gene searches. With this discovery, the altered gene, called RNF43, now ranks as one of the most common mutations in the two cancer types.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Lancet Oncology
International research group publishes updated criteria for diagnosing multiple myeloma
The International Myeloma Working Group today announced that it has updated the criteria for diagnosing multiple myeloma. A paper outlining the new criteria was published in the journal Lancet Oncology. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell.

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Biosensors and Bioelectronics
New nanodevice to improve cancer treatment monitoring
In less than a minute, a miniature device developed at the University of Montreal can measure a patient's blood for methotrexate, a commonly used but potentially toxic cancer drug. Just as accurate and ten times less expensive than equipment currently used in hospitals.
National Science and Engineering Research Council, Centre for self-assembled chemical structures, Fonds québécois de recherche – Nature et technologies, Institut Mérieux

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stem Cells
Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, M.S., Ph.D., who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Prognostic factors identified for peripheral squamous cell carcinomas of the lung
A better survival outcome is associated with low blood levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, or absence of tumor invasion either into the space between the lungs and chest wall or into blood vessels of individuals with a peripheral squamous cell carcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
European multicenter harmonization study shows anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing
Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein expression test, immunohistochemistry, is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Novel software application can stratify early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients
Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool developed at Mayo Clinic that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung cancer patients into risk groups that have significantly different disease-free survival outcome.

Contact: Rob mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Dartmouth study measures breast cancer tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
A Dartmouth study suggests that it may be possible to use Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic imaging to predict which patients will best respond to chemotherapy used to shrink breast cancer tumors before surgery. These findings could eliminate delays in effective early treatment for tumors unlikely to respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1268.

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