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Showing releases 201-225 out of 1245.

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Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Oncotarget
Researchers identify new ways to drain cancer's 'fuel tank'
Scientists at the University of Manchester have discovered a potential weakness in cancer's ability to return or become resistant to treatment, by targeting the 'fuel' part of stem cells which allows tumors to grow.
Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Cancer Research UK

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@manchester.ac.uk
01-612-758-383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
RSNA 2014 100th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting
New device may ease mammography discomfort
Researchers have developed a new device that may result in more comfortable mammography for women. According to a new study, standardizing the pressure applied in mammography would reduce pain associated with breast compression without sacrificing image quality.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Science Signaling
New insights into breast cancer spread could yield better tests and treatments
A study combining patients' tumor cells with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far that a specific trio of cells is required for the spread of breast cancer. The findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread. The study, led by researchers at the NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center and Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, published today in Science Signaling.
National Institutes of Health, Breast Cancer Alliance, Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Einstein Integrated Imaging Program

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
One-two punch of drugs better than either alone against colorectal cancer
Experimental anti-cancer agents PF-04691502 and PD-0325901 excel in lab tests against colorectal cancer models and enter phase 1 trial.
Pfizer, CU Cancer Center

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Why cancer cells grow despite a lack of oxygen
Healthy cells reduce their growth when there is a lack of oxygen (hypoxia). This makes it even more surprising that hypoxia is a characteristic feature of malignant tumors. In two publications in the current edition of the Nature Communications journal, researchers from Goethe University and the Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen report on how cancer cells succeed at circumventing the genetic program of growth inhibition.

Contact: Amparo Acker-Palmer
Acker-Palmer@bio.uni-frankfurt.de
49-069-798-42563
Goethe University Frankfurt

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Genetics in Medicine
Pathology specialist contributes to debate on breast cancer gene screening
What are the risks and benefits of screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the general adult population? Dr. Glenn Palomaki has published an invited commentary in Genetics in Medicine on this issue.

Contact: Amy Blustein
ablustein@wihri.org
401-681-2822
Women & Infants Hospital

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of Urology
Long-term testosterone therapy does not increase the risk of prostate cancer
Testosterone (T) therapy is routinely used in men with hypogonadism, a condition in which diminished function of the gonads occurs. Although there is no evidence that T therapy increases the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), there are still concerns and a paucity of long-term data. Investigators examined three parallel, prospective, ongoing, cumulative registry studies of over 1,000 men. Their analysis showed that long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe and does not increase the risk of PCa.

Contact: Linda Gruner
jumedia@elsevier.com
212-633-3923
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric ulcers and cancer. To combat the infection, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Jacobs School of Engineering developed LipoLLA, a therapeutic nanoparticle that contains linolenic acid, a component in vegetable oils. In mice, LipoLLA was safe and more effective against H. pylori infection than standard antibiotic treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A hybrid vehicle that delivers DNA
A new hybrid vehicle is under development. Its performance isn't measured by the distance it travels, but rather the delivery of its cargo: vaccines that contain genetically engineered DNA to fight HIV, cancer, influenza and other maladies. Described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the technology could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite two decades of research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cell Research
Discovery by NUS researchers contributes towards future treatment of multiple sclerosis
A multi-disciplinary research team from the National University of Singapore has made a breakthrough discovery of a new type of immune cells that may help in the development of a future treatment for multiple sclerosis.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Selenium compounds boost immune system to fight against cancer
Cancer types such as melanoma, prostate cancer and certain types of leukaemia weaken the body by over-activating the natural immune system. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have now demonstrated that selenium -- naturally found in, e.g., garlic and broccoli -- slows down the immune over-response. In the long term, this may improve cancer treatment. The findings have been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Contact: Søren Skov
sosk@sund.ku.dk
45-28-75-76-79
University of Copenhagen - The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cancer
Adult survivors of childhood eye cancer experience few cognitive or social setbacks
Adult survivors of retinoblastoma, a type of eye cancer that usually develops in early childhood, have few cognitive or social problems decades following their diagnosis and treatment.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
BioResearch Open Access
New treatments for cancer, diabetes, and heart disease -- you may have a pig to thank
Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. A Comprehensive Review article entitled 'Current Progress of Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Biomedical Research,' describing advances in techniques to create and use pig models and their impact on the development of novel drugs and cell and gene therapies, is published in BioResearch Open Access.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
reillymb@ucmail.uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
High-dose interleukin-2 effective in mRCC pre-treated with VEGF-targeted therapies
High-dose interleukin-2 can be effective in selected metastatic renal cell cancer patients pre-treated with VEGF-targeted agents, reveals research presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Study shows mental health impact of breast size differences in teens
Differences in breast size have a significant mental health impact in adolescent girls, affecting self-esteem, emotional well-being, and social functioning, reports the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Johns Hopkins scientists link gene to tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers
After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy.
Department of Defense's Breast Cancer Research Program, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute, Avon Foundation, Stetler Fund, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Health Cancer Center Support Grant

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Lipid Research
UAlberta researchers stop 'vicious cycle of inflammation' that leads to tumor growth
A team of researchers from the University of Alberta has discovered a new approach to fighting breast and thyroid cancers by targeting an enzyme they say is the culprit for the 'vicious cycle' of tumor growth, spread and resistance to treatment.
Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, Alberta Cancer Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions

Contact: Ross Neitz
rneitz@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
'Dramatic' early phase 1 results for AG-120 in IDH1 mutated AML
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows 'extremely promising' early phase 1 clinical trial results for the investigational drug AG-120 against the subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring mutations in the gene IDH1.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry B
Cell's skeleton is never still
Computer models developed at Rice University show how microtubules age. The models help explain the dynamic instability seen in microtubules, essential elements in cells' cytoskeletons.
Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cancer
Survivors of childhood eye cancer experience normal cognitive functioning as adults
Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Value in Health
New model of follow up for breast cancer patients
Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health system perspective.

Contact: Jon Karnon
jonathan.karnon@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-133-562
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Clipping proteins that package genes may limit abnormal cell growth in tumors
Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Hutchinson Whampoa and the Human Frontier Science Program, Ellison Medical Foundation, Developmental Research Pilot Project Program at Mount Sinai

Contact: Lucia Lee
lucia.lee@mountsinai.org
212-241-7445
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Women's Health Issues
Women with serious mental illness less likely to receive cancer screenings
Study finds that women with symptoms of serious mental illness are 40 percent less likely to receive three cancer screenings: mammography, clinical breast exams and PAP smears.

Contact: Sharita Forrest
slforres@illinois.edu
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1245.

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