IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1263.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Some women still don't underststand 'overdiagnosis' risk in breast screening
A third of women who are given information about the chance of 'overdiagnosis' through the NHS breast screening programme may not fully understand the risks involved.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Flora Malein
flora.malein@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98300
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells
Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters -- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream -- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center.
Janssen Diagnostics, Stand Up to Cancer, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, National Foundation for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, ESSCO Breast Cancer Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Clinical Oncology
Research demonstrates potential method to better control lung cancer using radiotherapy
Researchers at the University of Manchester and the Christie NHS Foundation Trust -- both part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre -- have looked at ways to personalize and increase the dose to the tumor while minimizing the effect on healthy tissue.

Contact: Alison Barbuti
alison.barbuti@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Molecular Cell
Research shows how premalignant cells can sense oncogenesis and halt growth
What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. CSHL experiments now show how cells can respond to an activated RAS gene by entering a quiescent state called senescence.
National Institutes of Health, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer Center Support Grant, Fonds de Recherche de l'Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal; Heart and Stroke Foundation-Québec

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Gastroenterology
Drug shows promise for subset of stage III colon cancer patients
A subset of patients with stage III colon cancer had improved survival rates when treated with irinotecan-based therapy, according to a new study in Gastroenterology.

Contact: Aimee Frank
media@gastro.org
301-941-2620
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
JAMA Dermatology
Photodynamic therapy vs. cryotherapy for actinic keratoses
Photodynamic therapy (PDT, which uses topical agents and light to kill tissue) appears to better clear actinic keratoses (AKs, a common skin lesion caused by sun damage) at three months after treatment than cryotherapy (which uses liquid nitrogen to freeze lesions).

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Genome Biology
Better classification to improve treatments for breast cancer
Breast cancer can be classified into ten different subtypes, and scientists have developed a tool to identify which is which. The research, published in the journal Genome Biology, could improve treatments and targeting of treatments for the disease.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
ACS Nano
The thunder god vine, assisted by nanotechnology, could shake up future cancer treatment
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. The collaboration between the Institute of Basic Science/Seoul National University and National Cancer Center Singapore represents an auspicious therapeutic approach about HCC.
Institute for Basic Science, SingHealth Foundation, National Medical Research Council, Biomedical Research Council of Singapore, Millennium Foundation

Contact: Han Bin Oh
ohanvin@ibs.re.kr
82-428-788-182
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Scientists map the 'editing marks' on fly, worm, human genomes
In the Aug. 28 issue of the journal Nature a multi-institution research network called modENCODE (the Model Organism ENCylopedia Of DNA Elements) published three major papers that map and compare the genomes and epigenomes of humans and two model organisms, the fly, D. melanogaster, and the worm, C. elegans, in unprecedented detail. The fly and worm could serve as model organisms for screening drugs and micronutrients that might alter the epigenome, which is implicated in many diseases.

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Fighting prostate cancer with a tomato-rich diet
Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 percent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests.
National Institute for Health Research

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Promising new cancer therapy uses molecular 'Trash Man' to exploit a common cancer defense
While many scientists are trying to prevent the onset of a cancer defense mechanism known as autophagy, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are leveraging it in a new therapy that causes the process to culminate in cell death rather than survival.
National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Human Genetics
Dartmouth isolates environmental influences in genome-wide association studies
Model allows researcher to remove false positive findings that plague modern research when many dozens of factors and their interactions are suggested to play a role in causing complex diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Blood
Drug represents first potential treatment for common anemia
An experimental drug designed to help regulate the blood's iron supply shows promise as a viable first treatment for anemia of inflammation, according to results from the first human study of the treatment published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
202-552-4914
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Symptoms after breast cancer surgery need to be treated on an individual basis
For those affected, breast cancer is a dramatic diagnosis. Patients often have to endure chemotherapy and surgery, which, depending on the individual scenario, may mean breast conserving surgery or breast removal -- mastectomy. In the aftermath, many women experience symptoms such as pain, fatigue/exhaustion, or sleep disturbances. However, the symptoms are highly individual, as Stefan Feiten and colleagues emphasize in a recent study reported in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International.

Contact: Stefan Feiten
s.feiten@invo-koblenz.de
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Methods
New tool to probe cancer's molecular make-up
Researchers from the Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute based at the University of Manchester -- part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre -- and the Institute of Cancer Research, London, looked at protein kinases, molecules that control various aspects of cellular function.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/Pfizer CASE Studentship, Cancer Research UK

Contact: Alison Barbuti
alison.barbuti@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
BJU International
US has seen widespread adoption of robot-assisted cancer surgery to remove the prostate
A new study reveals that the US has experienced widespread adoption of robot-assisted prostate removal surgery to treat prostate cancer in recent years. The BJU International study also found that while such surgeries are more expensive than traditional surgeries, their costs are decreasing over time.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Tumor blood vessel protein provides potential therapeutic target
A recent study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation identifies a tumor vessel-specific protein, L1 that can be targeted to reduce tumor growth

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis
Ames test adapted successfully to screen complex aerosols
The Ames test, which is used to determine whether a chemical has the potential to cause cancer, has been adapted for use with cigarette smoke and other complex aerosols. The test works by observing how much a chemical causes bacteria genetically modified to require an additional amino acid for growth to mutate. A new test uses different bacteria and an exposure method that allows aerosols to be tested.
British American Tobacco

Contact: Marina Murphy
marina_murphy@bat.com
44-077-111-50135
R&D at British American Tobacco

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sorting cells with sound waves
Researchers from MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Carnegie Mellon University have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Cancer
Men who are uneducated about their prostate cancer have difficulty making good treatment choices
They say knowledge is power, and a new UCLA study has shown this is definitely the case when it comes to men making the best decisions about how to treat their prostate cancer.

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle
Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, US Department of Defense, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Veterans Administration, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Dorsey Griffith
dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Kite Pharma announces positive results in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
Kite Pharma Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing engineered autologous T cell therapy products for the treatment of cancer, today announced the publication of clinical results in a cohort of patients demonstrating the potential to treat aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy.
Kite Pharma

Contact: Justin Jackson
jjackson@burnsmc.com
212-213-0006 x327
Burns McClellan

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
ACM Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining Conference
Study shows promise in automated reasoning, hypothesis generation over complete medical literature
With approximately 50 million scientific papers available in public databases -- and a new one publishing nearly every 30 seconds -- scientists cannot know about every relevant study when they are deciding where to take their research next. A new tool in development by computational biologists at Baylor College of Medicine and analytics experts at IBM research and tested as a 'proof-of-principle' may one day help researchers mine all public medical literature and formulate hypotheses that promise the greatest reward when pursuing new scientific studies.

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Oncotarget
Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas -- the primary form of a deadly brain cancer -- are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature. These findings have been published online as a priority report in the journal Oncotarget.
Sontag Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, Kimmel Foundation, Doris Duke Foundation, Forbeck Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Molecular and Cellular Biology
New biomarker highly promising for predicting breast cancer outcomes
A protein named p66ShcA shows promise as a biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1263.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

EurekAlert!