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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1375.

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Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Anastrozole prevents recurrence more than tamoxifen in some with noninvasive breast cancer
Anastrozole provides a significant benefit compared with tamoxifen in preventing recurrence after a lumpectomy and radiation therapy in postmenopausal women ages 60 years or younger who had DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ), a common diagnosis of non-invasive breast cancer. In women over age 60, it works as well as tamoxifen. These findings were presented today at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago. The benefit reported in this trial appeared later in follow up of the women in the study.

Contact: Nora Dudley
nodudley@lumc.edu
708-216-6268
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Annals of Oncology
ESMO announces scale to stratify magnitude of clinical benefit of anticancer medicines
ESMO, the European Society for Medical Oncology, has announced today the publication of the ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale, a tool to assist oncology clinicians in evaluating the most effective anti-cancer medicines for their patients.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Removing more breast tissue reduces by half the need for second cancer surgery
Removing more tissue during a partial mastectomy could spare thousands of breast cancer patients a second surgery, according to a Yale Cancer Center study. The findings were published online May 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

Contact: Vicky Agnew
Vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Targeted drug can 'diminish the suffering' of myelofibrosis say Mayo Clinic researchers
Use of the targeted agent pacritinib significantly reduced the symptoms and burden of advanced myelofibrosis in patients, says a Mayo Clinic researcher who co-led PERSIST-1, the worldwide phase III clinical trial that tested the therapy. Specifically, pacritinib substantially reduced severe enlargement of the spleen, a typical feature of advanced myelofibrosis, in more than 20 percent of patients and alleviated debilitating side effects in more than 46 percent.
CTI Biopharma

Contact: Joe Dangor
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology
AAPG Bulletin
Combining targeted drug with chemotherapy offers longer life to B-cell cancer patients
Because of the significant benefit found in combining the targeted drug ibrutinib with standard chemotherapy for relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma, an interim analysis has closed the international HELIOS phase III clinical trial.

Contact: Paul Scotti
scotti.paul@mayo.edu
904-953-0199
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Study identifies possible new combination chemotherapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer
A role for combination therapy using two or more chemotherapy agents at the same time has not been well studied. This week, however, results of a clinical trial presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may change the perspective on a role for combination chemotherapy in advanced disease.

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
SIRFLOX study presented at ASCO 2015 Annual Meeting
Clinical investigators cite significance of 7.9 month improvement in Progression-Free Survival in the liver for patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer treated first line with SIR-Spheres® Y-90 resin microspheres plus chemotherapy.

Contact: Iga Rawicka
irawicka@sirtex.com
Sirtex Medical Limited

Public Release: 30-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Practice-changing study offers new option for tough breast cancer cases
A new phase 3 study in some of the most difficult-to-treat patients, women with endocrine-resistant disease, showed that the newly approved drug, palbociclib, more than doubled the time to cancer recurrence for women with hormone-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer.

Contact: Edyta Zielinska
edyta.zielinska@jefferson.edu
215-847-5884
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Myriad significantly advances the myChoice HRD companion diagnostic test
Myriad will present data from new clinical studies on its myChoice HRD companion diagnostic test at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. The myChoice HRD score is a biomarker that indicates the inability of cancer cells to repair DNA damage and reflects a tumor's sensitivity to DNA-damaging medicines such as PARP (poly-ADP ribose polymerase) inhibitors and platinum-based therapies to help physicians tailor treatments to individual patients.

Contact: Ron Rogers
rrogers@myriad.com
908-285-0248
Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
New England Journal of Medicine
Genetic biomarker may predict cancer patients' response to immunotherapy drug
In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors.
Swim Across America, Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Banyan Gate Foundation, Commonwealth Fund, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
UH Case Medical Center experts to present data at 51st ASCO Annual Meeting
Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine will present data from several new studies, including a study evaluating a potential novel combination treatment for cancer patients with advanced solid tumors and a first-of-its-kind analysis of gene mutations in small cell lung cancer, at the 51st American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Myriad presents new myRisk hereditary cancer data at 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting
Myriad will present several new clinical studies on its myRisk Hereditary Cancer molecular diagnostic test at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. The myRisk test assesses 25 genes for mutations associated with eight hereditary cancers. The test represents a significant new opportunity to help physicians tailor treatments to individuals based on their genetic results as well as their personal and family history of cancer.

Contact: Ron Rogers
rrogers@myriad.com
908-285-0248
Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Pembrolizumab shows real promise against head and neck cancer
Immunotherapy with the anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab decreased the size of tumors by 30 percent or more in 24.8 percent of 132 patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer. That's nearly twice as effective as the current preferred treatment.
Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Study shows colorectal cancer genetically different in older and younger patients
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in conjunction with the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 offers early evidence of genetic differences between CRC in young and old patients, possibly pointing toward different treatments and strategies in combating the young form of the disease.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
ONT-380 has stage IV HER2+ breast cancer patient 'worrying about normal stuff again'
Promising clinical trial results presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 show activity of the investigational anti-cancer agent ONT-380 against HER2+ breast cancer, in one case specifically against brain metastases and in another case in overall survival of heavily pretreated HER2+ breast cancer patients.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 29-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Study shows sexual dysfunction after gynecologic cancer treatment
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 shows decreased sexual activity in women following treatment for gynecologic cancers, down from 6.1-6.8 times per month before treatment to 2.6-4.9 times per month after treatment.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 28-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
ASCO: MEDI4736 combined with tremelimumab results in acceptable toxicity in NSCLC patients
Advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients have few effective treatment options and low 5-year survival rates. The checkpoint inhibitors MEDI4736 and tremelimumab have both demonstrated acceptable safety and potential efficacy when used as single-agents in several different types of cancer.

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kim.Polacek@Moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 28-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Research roundup from Penn's Abramson Cancer Center
Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn's Perelman School of Medicine will present results from several clinical trials and other key studies during the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting from May 29 through June 2.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-301-5221
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Nineteen medical school deans join together to call for sustainable biomedical research funding
Unstable funding is threatening the viability of academic biomedical research in this country, according to a new paper published this week in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The paper was written jointly by the deans of 19 prominent medical schools around the country. Among this group is University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece.

Contact: David Kohn
dkohn@som.umaryland.edu
410-706-7590
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
Cancer Prevention Research
ASCO: Component in green tea may help reduce prostate cancer in men at high risk
Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer in men and is predicted to result in an estimated 220,00 cases in the United States in 2015. A team of researchers led by Nagi B. Kumar, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.D.A. at Moffitt Cancer Center recently published results of a randomized trial that assessed the safety and effectiveness of the active components in green tea to prevent prostate cancer development in men who have premalignant lesions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kim.Polacek@Moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 28-May-2015
Journal of Surgical Research
Portable finger-probe device can successfully measure liver function in potential organ donors
A portable, finger-probe device successfully measured liver function in brain dead adult organ donors, a finding that could change the way organs are assessed and save thousands of dollars per transplant.
Dumont-UCLA Transplant Center, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 28-May-2015
International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics
RTOG 0537 shows acupuncture-like ENS may provide relief for radiation-induced dry mouth
Phase III results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0537 indicate that acupuncture-like, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be equally effective as pilocarpine, the current prescription medication in a pill, to treat radiation-induced dry mouth, according to a study published in the June 1, 2015 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
michellek@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 28-May-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
UofL part of first successful study of virus attack on cancer
Scientists have found that stage IIIb to IV melanoma patients treated with a modified cold sore (herpes) virus had improved survival. The results of the findings were published recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Julie Heflin
julie.heflin@louisville.edu
502-852-7987
University of Louisville

Public Release: 28-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
ASCO: Nivolumab treatment in melanoma patients has manageable safety profile
The monoclonal antibody nivolumab has shown promise as a therapeutic agent, particularly by improving the survival rates of melanoma patients. Jeffrey S. Weber, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center at Moffitt Cancer Center will be presenting data from a retrospective analysis of the safety of nivolumab in 4 ongoing phase I-III studies in melanoma patients at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kim.Polacek@Moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 28-May-2015
2015 ASCO Annual Conference
ASCO: JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib has promising efficacy in CMML patients
Eric Padron, M.D., assistant member of the Malignant Hematology Program at Moffitt Cancer Center will report on the first phase 1 study of the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in CMML patients at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kim.Polacek@Moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1375.

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