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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1265.

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Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Novel regulatory mechanism for cell division found
A protein kinase or enzyme known as PKM2 has proven to control cell division, potentially providing a molecular basis for tumor diagnosis and treatment.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Three drugs may be better than one for certain patients with advanced colorectal cancer
Patients with a form of advanced colorectal cancer that is driven by a mutated version of the BRAF gene have limited treatment options available. However, results, reported at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium, from a multi-center clinical trial suggest that the cancer may respond to a combination of three targeted drugs: encorafenib, cetuximab and alpelisib.
Novartis

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Results of new drug, ASP8273, show response in patients with treatment-resistant NSCLC
In a second presentation looking at new ways of treating non-small cell lung cancer that has both the EGFR and T790M mutations, researchers will tell the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium that an oral drug called ASP8273 has caused tumor shrinkage in patients in a phase I clinical trial in Japan. ASP8273 is a new drug that inhibits the EGFR mutation and the T790M resistance mutation.
Astellas Pharma Inc.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cell
Largest-ever map of the human interactome predicts new cancer genes
Scientists have created the largest-scale map to date of direct interactions between proteins encoded by the human genome and newly predicted dozens of genes to be involved in cancer.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, Krembil Foundation, Canada Excellence Research Chair, Avon Foundation, Ontario Research Fund, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
416-971-4876
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
Salk scientists unveil powerful method to speed cancer drug discovery
The new method lets researchers identify weak and previously undetectable interactions between proteins inside living cells.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Chemistry & Biology
Researchers report way to target hard-to-hit site in disease pathway
Researchers have successfully targeted an important molecular pathway that fuels a variety of cancers and related developmental syndromes called 'Rasopathies.' Reporting their results Nov. 20 in Chemistry & Biology, scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center say they identified a class of lead compounds that successfully recognize a key target in the Ras signaling pathway -- opening the door to future development of therapies that could make treatments more effective with fewer side effects.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cancer Cell
A CNIO team discovers that a derivative of vitamin B3 prevents liver cancer in mice
Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), have produced the first mouse model that faithfully reproduces the steps of human HCC development. The results, published in the prestigious journal Cancer Cell, indicate that diets rich in nicotinamide riboside, a derivative of vitamin B3, protect these mice from developing HCC in its most initial stage, when genotoxic stress is damaging cellular DNA. They also show a curative effect of the diet in those mice that had previously developed the disease.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
Signaling molecule crucial to stem cell reprogramming
While investigating a rare genetic disorder, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a ubiquitous signaling molecule is crucial to cellular reprogramming, a finding with significant implications for stem cell-based regenerative medicine, wound repair therapies and potential cancer treatments.
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, UC San Diego Stem Cell Program, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-5232
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Moffitt researchers use evolutionary principles to model cancer mutations
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are taking a unique approach to understanding and investigating cancer by utilizing evolutionary principles and computational modeling to examine the role of specific genetic mutations in the Darwinian struggle among tumor and normal cells during cancer growth.
Physical Sciences in Oncology Centers, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
PharmaMar presents results at EORTC-NCI-AACR to highlight a pipeline of targeted therapies
PharmaMar will present data at the EORTC-NCI-AACR for its drug Yondelis and several investigational compounds, highlighting its pipeline of targeted therapies. Some of the most relevant results showed will focus on the mechanism of action of Aplidin, a drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of multiple myeloma, and the activity of a new antibody-drug conjugate on HER-2 positive tumor cells and xenograft tumors.

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
FASEB Journal
Antiangiogenic treatment improves survival in animal model of ovarian cancer
Coupling an antiangiogenic treatment with low-dose chemotherapy results in improved survival rates in an animal model of ovarian cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Ovarian Cancer Canada, BIDMC CAO Pilot Grant

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Angewandte Chemie
UC Irvine-Italian researchers create first inhibitor for enzyme linked to cancers
Recent studies showing acid ceramidase (AC) to be upregulated in melanoma, lung and prostate cancers have made the enzyme a desired target for novel synthetic inhibitor compounds. This week in Angewandte Chemie, a top journal in chemistry, UC Irvine and Italian Institute of Technology scientists describe the very first class of AC inhibitors that may aid in the efficacy of chemotherapies.
Carlsberg Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
Every step you take: STING pathway key to tumor immunity
A protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies in Immunity. The results have major implications for the growing field of cancer immunotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ludwig Cancer Research, Foglia Family Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
The STING of radiation
A team of researchers led by Ludwig Chicago's Yang-Xin Fu and Ralph Weichselbaum has uncovered the primary signaling mechanisms and cellular interactions that drive immune responses against tumors treated with radiotherapy. Published in the current issue of Immunity, their study suggests novel strategies for boosting the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and for combining it with therapies that harness the immune system to treat cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Ludwig Cancer Research, The Foglia Foundation

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
E-cigarettes significantly reduce tobacco cravings
Electronic cigarettes offer smokers a realistic way to kick their tobacco smoking addiction. In a new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, scientists at KU Leuven report that e-cigarettes successfully reduced cravings for tobacco cigarettes, with only minimal side effects.

Contact: Frank Baeyens
frank.baeyens@ppw.kuleuven.be
32-163-26125
KU Leuven

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
JAMA Surgery
Study examines national trends in mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer
Higher proportions of women eligible for breast conservation surgery are undergoing mastectomy, breast reconstruction and bilateral mastectomy -- surgical removal of both breasts -- with the steepest increases seen in women with lymph node-negative and in situ, contained, disease, according to a report published online by JAMA Surgery.

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Response to new drug in patients with lymphomas and advanced solid tumors
Patients with B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphomas and advanced solid tumors have responded to a new drug that is being tested for the first time in humans in a phase I trial. Results will be presented at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium. They show responses in four lymphoma patients who have failed numerous previous treatments and in one patient with a cancer for which there is no approved medical treatment at all -- a malignant rhabdoid tumor in the brain.
Eisai, Epizyme Inc.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Common blood pressure medication does not increase risk of breast cancer, new study finds
Women who take a common type of medication to control their blood pressure are not at increased risk of developing breast cancer due to the drug, according to new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah.

Contact: Jess C. Gomez
jess.gomez@imail.org
801-718-8495
Intermountain Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Researchers pioneer new approach to treating HPV-related cervical cancer
A drug that is already well established as a treatment for infection of the retina in people with AIDS has been shown, for the first time, to sensitise cervical cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy without an increase in toxic side-effects. Cidofovir is an anti-viral drug that is effective against several viruses, including the human papilloma virus (HPV), which is implicated in the onset of cervical cancer. The research is presented at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
JAMA Surgery
Vanderbilt study finds more breast cancer patients opting for mastectomy
Far more breast cancer patients are choosing to undergo mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery even when they have early stage disease that is confined to one breast, a Vanderbilt study shows. In the past decade, there have also been marked trends toward higher proportions of women opting for breast reconstruction.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations, Veterans Affairs National Quality Scholars Program

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Gene therapy provides safe, long-term relief for patients with severe hemophilia B
Gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, University College London and the Royal Free Hospital has transformed life for men with a severe form of hemophilia B by providing a safe, reliable source of the blood clotting protein Factor IX that has allowed some to adopt a more active lifestyle, researchers reported. The results appear in the Nov. 20 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Assisi Foundation of Memphis, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, ALSAC, Medical Research Council, Katharine Dormandy Trust, NHS Blood and Transplant, and others

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
MSK team makes key discovery in understanding immunotherapy's successes -- and its failures
A collaborative team of leaders in the field of cancer immunology from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has made a key discovery that advances the understanding of why some patients respond to ipilimumab, an immunotherapy drug, while others do not.
Ludwig Cancer Research, Frederick Adler Fund, National Institutes of Health, Swim Across America, Ludwig Trust, Melanoma Research Alliance, Stand Up To Cancer-Cancer Research Institute Immunotherapy Dream Team

Contact: Jeanne D'Agostino
dagostij@mskcc.org
212-639-3573
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
A signature for success
A team led by Ludwig and Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers has published a landmark study on the genetic basis of response to a powerful cancer therapy known as immune checkpoint blockade. Their paper, in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, describes the precise genetic signatures in melanoma tumors that determine whether a patient will respond to one such therapy.
Ludwig Cancer Research, Frederick Adler Fund, US National Institutes of Health, Swim Across America, Ludwig Trust, Melanoma Research Alliance

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Cancer
Study finds wide variation in quality, content of clinical cancer guidelines
What's the best way to treat rectal cancer? Consult any of five top clinical guidelines for rectal cancer and you will get a different answer, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Power behind 'master' gene for cancer discovered
It's hard to believe, but there are similarities between bean sprouts and human cancer. The same mechanisms that result in bigger bean sprouts also cause cancer metastasis and tumor development.
National Institutes of Health, Fidelity Foundation, Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1265.

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