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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1238.

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Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Breast Cancer Research
The 'Angelina Effect' was not only immediate, but also long-lasting
Referrals for genetic counselling and testing for breast cancer risk more than doubled across the UK after actress Angelina Jolie announced in May last year that she tested positive for a BRCA1 gene mutation and underwent a double mastectomy. The rise in referrals continued through to October long after the announcement was made. This is according to research published in the journal Breast Cancer Research.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2243
BioMed Central

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Targeted radiation, drug therapy combo less toxic for recurrent head, neck cancers
Patients with a recurrence of head and neck cancer who have previously received radiation treatment can be treated more quickly, safely and with fewer side effects with high doses of targeted radiation known as Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in combination with a drug that also carefully targets cancerous tumors. These findings from a UPMC CancerCenter study were presented today at the American Society of Radiation Oncology annual meeting in San Francisco.

Contact: Jennifer C. Yates
YatesJC@upmc.edu
412-647-9966
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Many throat cancer patients can skip neck surgery
A new study shows that patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) -- the same virus associated with both cervical and head and neck cancer -- positive oropharyngeal cancer see significantly higher rates of complete response on a post-radiation neck dissection than those with HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer. Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers presented the findings at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 17.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-728-7784
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Menopause
NAMS issues first comprehensive recommendations on care of women at menopause and beyond
The North American Menopause Society has published its key, evidence-based recommendations for the comprehensive care of midlife women -- on everything from hot flashes to heart disease. This is the first, comprehensive set of evidence-based recommendations for the care of midlife women freely available to all clinicians who care for women at this stage of life.

Contact: Eileen Petridis
epetridis@fallscommunications.com
216-696-0229
The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Pathology
Wild berry extract may strengthen effectiveness of pancreatic cancer drug
A wild berry native to North America may strengthen the effectiveness of a chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat pancreatic cancer, reveals research published online in the Journal of Clinical Pathology.
Ministry of Higher Education - Malaysia, Have a Chance Inc.

Contact: Becky Attwood
r.attwood@soton.ac.uk
University of Southampton

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
For some lung cancer patients, surgery may yield better long-term results
Patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer who are otherwise healthy fare better over time if they undergo conventional surgery versus less-invasive radiosurgery to remove their cancer, according to a Yale study. The findings are scheduled to be presented at the 56th annual conference of the American Society for Radiation Oncology in San Francisco.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science

Contact: Vicky Agnew
vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Pathology
Wild berry extract may strengthen effectiveness of pancreatic cancer drug
A wild berry native to North America may strengthen the effectiveness of a chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat pancreatic cancer, reveals experimental research published online in the Journal of Clinical Pathology.
Ministry of Higher Education Malaysia

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Maturitas
Elsevier journal Maturitas publishes position statement on breast cancer screening
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the publication of a position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society in the journal Maturitas on the topic of breast cancer screening.

Contact: Greyling Peoples
g.peoples@elsevier.com
31-204-853-323
Elsevier

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Blood test could identify when cancer treatment has become detrimental
Some treatments for prostate cancer, while initially effective at controlling the disease, not only stop working over time but actually start driving tumour growth, a major new study shows.
Prostate Cancer UK, Movember Foundation, Cancer Research UK

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35380
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Cancer Research
New non-invasive technique could revolutionize the imaging of metastatic cancer
In preclinical animal models of metastatic prostate cancer, scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions have provided proof-of-principle of a new molecular imaging approach that could revolutionize doctors' ability to see tumors that have metastasized to other sites in the body, including the bones.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Patrick C. Walsh Foundation, National Foundation for Cancer Research

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Chromosome buffers hold key to better melanoma understanding
Buffers that guard against damage to the ends of chromosomes could hold the key to a better understanding of malignant melanoma -- the deadliest form of skin cancer -- according to new research from the University of Leeds.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Ben Jones
B.P.Jones@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-38059
University of Leeds

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Scientific Reports
Researchers examine role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment
Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island recently published the results of an investigation into how we might better tailor therapy for ovarian cancer.

Contact: Susan McDonald
slmcdonald@wihri.org
401-681-2816
Women & Infants Hospital

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
Large study reveals new genetic variants that raise risk for prostate cancer
In an analysis of genetic information among more than 87,000 men, a global team of scientists says it has found 23 new genetic variants -- common differences in the genetic code -- that increase a man's risk for prostate cancer. The so-called 'meta-analysis,' believed to be the largest of its kind, has revealed once hidden mutations among men in a broad array of ethnic groups comprising men of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK, Prostate Cancer UK, EU, Patrick Henry, P. Kevin Jaffe, and Peter Jay Sharpe Foundation

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
Moffitt researchers help lead efforts to find new genetic links to prostate cancer
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center, including Center Director Thomas A. Sellers, Ph.D., M.P.H., Jong Park, Ph.D. and Hui-Yi Lin, Ph.D., have discovered 23 new regions of the genome that influence the risk for developing prostate cancer, according to a study published Sept. 14 in Nature Genetics.

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Abnormal properties of cancer protein revealed in fly eyes
Mutations in the human retinoblastoma protein gene are a leading cause of eye cancer. Now, Michigan State University scientists have turned to fruit fly eyes to unlock the secrets of this important cancer gene.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Oncotarget
Five genes to predict colorectal cancer relapses
Researchers at the Catalan Institute of Oncology-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by David Garcia-Molleví have identified five genes differentially expressed in normal accompanying cells in colorectal tumors. Analysis of these genes could be used to classify colorectal tumors, predict the evolution of the patient and thus take appropriate clinical decisions to prevent relapses.
Spanish Government

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
34-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Single fraction RT as effective as multiple fraction RT for bone metastases
A prospective study that compared patient-reported outcomes of a broad set of cancer patients with bone metastases demonstrates that single fraction radiation therapy is equally as effective as multiple fraction radiation therapy when pain, function and quality of life are considered, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Long-term results of RTOG 0236 confirm good primary tumor control, positive 5-year survival rates
Patients with inoperable, early-stage lung cancer who receive stereotactic body radiation therapy have a five-year survival rate of 40 percent, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
NSCLC patients who never smoked or who quit smoking have lower risk of developing secondary cancers
Non-small cell lung cancer survivors who never smoked or who are former smokers at the time of diagnosis have a lower risk of developing secondary primary lung cancers compared to those who are current smokers, suggesting that increased tobacco exposure is associated with a higher risk of SPLC, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Cancer patients with malignant spinal cord compression have preserved mobility
Mobility is equally preserved in cancer patients suffering from malignant spinal cord compression who receive a single dose of 10 Gy of radiation therapy, compared to patients who receive five daily doses of 4 Gy of radiation therapy each, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Lancet Oncology
Improved risk identification will aid fertility preservation in young male cancer patients
A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators has found the chemotherapy dose threshold below which male childhood cancer survivors are likely to have normal sperm production. The study appears in Sept. 17 edition of the journal Lancet Oncology.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning
Men with prostate cancer may one day be able to predict when and how much various treatments will impact their urinary and sexual functioning, thanks in part to new findings that researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 16.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-728-7784
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Benefit of endocrine therapy in elderly women with low risk hormone receptor positive breast cancer?
Treatment with endocrine therapy and radiation therapy as part of breast conservation is the current standard of care for women with hormone-receptor positive invasive breast cancer. A new study by researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center, however, shows that combination may not be necessary for all patient populations with the disease.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-728-7784
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Cancers
Epigenetic drugs: A hope to treat cancer resistance and reduce cancer relapse?
'Recent studies suggest that epigenetic modifications may contribute to the development of cancer progenitor cells that can induce drug resistance and the relapse of different types of cancer,' said Sibaji Sarkar, Ph.D., instructor of medicine at BUSM. Adult drug resistant cancer cells may contribute to this problem, and the authors discuss these and other cancer drug resistance mechanisms in their recent publication in the September issue of the journal Cancers.

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Chemotherapy and SABR consecutively may be promising treatment option for advanced pancreatic cancer
For patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the combination of chemotherapy and stereotactic ablative radiation may be a promising treatment option, ultimately allowing them to undergo surgery that may not otherwise be an option, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1238.

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