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Showing releases 226-250 out of 1264.

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Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
JAMA
Medical professional liability claims and esophageal cancer screening
An analysis of liability claims related to esophageal cancer screening finds that the risks of claims arising from acts of commission -- complications from screening procedure -- as well as acts of omission -- failure to screen -- are similarly low, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Shantell Kirkendoll
smkirk@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Targeted treatment could halt womb cancer growth
A drug which targets a key gene fault could halt an aggressive womb cancer and shrink tumours, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer.

Contact: Emily Head
emily.head@cancer.org.uk
44-203-469-6189
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New discovery approach accelerates identification of potential cancer treatments
Researchers at the University of Michigan have described a new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments that requires a fraction of the time needed for more traditional methods.
Life Sciences Institute's Innovation Partnership

Contact: Laura Williams
laurajw@umich.edu
734-615-4862
University of Michigan

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Endoscopists recommend frequent colonoscopies, leading to its overuse
A retrospective study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, has found an overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. The study demonstrated that endoscopists commonly recommended shorter follow-up intervals than established guidelines support, and these recommendations were strongly correlated with subsequent colonoscopy overuse.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Oncotarget
First mapping that reveals the molecular pathway for MDSC cancer progression
InSilico Medicine and partners establish a map for cancer progression induced by MDSCs, and a means to extinguish them.
Federal Clinical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology

Contact: Michael Petr
michael.petr@insilicomedicine.com
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Health Technology Assessment
Genetic test would help 'cut bowel cancer spread'
Screening families of patients with bowel cancer for a genetic condition would cut their risk of developing bowel, womb, and ovarian cancers, new research has found.
National Institute for Health Research

Contact: Chris Jones
jonesc83@cardiff.ac.uk
Cardiff University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Nivolumab shows signs of superior response rate compared to standard chemo in advanced melanoma
The monoclonal antibody nivolumab achieves superior response rates and a longer duration of response than standard chemotherapy in patients whose melanoma has progressed after treatment with ipilimumab, according to phase III data presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
New data on combination treatments for melanoma
Combination therapy with both BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and MEK inhibitor cobimetinib achieves greater progression-free survival and response rates than vemurafenib plus placebo in BRAF-mutation positive melanoma, according to phase III data presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Targeted combination therapy halts disease, extends life in advanced melanoma patients
A world-first study in today's New England Journal of Medicine heralds the efficacy of a targeted combination drug therapy after reporting major declines in the risk of disease progression and death in people with metastatic melanoma.
GlaxoSmithKline

Contact: Dan Gaffney
daniel.gaffney@sydney.edu.au
61-481-004-782
University of Sydney

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Oncogene
Scientists discover a new role for estrogen in the pathology of breast cancer
Scientists have discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which estrogen prepares cells to divide, grow and, in the case of estrogen-positive breast cancers, resist cancer drugs. The researchers say the work reveals new targets for breast cancer therapy and will help doctors predict which patients need the most aggressive treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Studies report new findings on treatment options for mesothelioma
Treating patients with high-dose radiotherapy after chemotherapy and surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma does not achieve improvements in local relapse and overall survival, according to data from a prospective randomized phase II trial presented at ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Landmark Medicare law had little impact on reducing chemotherapy cost
Legislation passed in 2003 to slow the spiraling costs of drugs paid for by the federal government to treat Medicare patients has had no meaningful impact on cancer chemotherapy drug costs. In this study, the authors note that not only did the policy fail, cancer care cost has skyrocketed. During the decade after the law passed, the aggregate cost of cancer care increased by as much as 60 percent, even though cancer rates had fallen.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Myriad presents tumor BRACAnalysis CDx study at ESMO
Data presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology annual meeting show that Myriad's Tumor BRACAnalysis CDx companion diagnostic test significantly improved the detection of cancer-causing BRCA1/2 mutations by 44 percent in women with ovarian cancer. The results show that the Tumor BRACAnalysis CDx test identified 28.3 percent of women with either germline or somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. In contrast, blood germline testing only identified the 19.6 percent of patients with germline BRCA1/2 mutations.

Contact: Ronald Rogers
rrogers@myriad.com
801-584-3065
Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Promising results shown with targeted approaches in subsets of non-small cell lung cancer
The BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib has significant anti-tumour activity in patients with advanced BRAF V600E mutant non-small cell lung cancer whose disease has progressed after chemotherapy, according to phase II data presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
New way to detox? 'Gold of Pleasure' oilseed boosts liver detoxification enzymes
University of Illinois scientists have found compounds that boost liver detoxification enzymes nearly fivefold, and they've found them in a pretty unlikely place -- the crushed seeds left after oil extraction from an oilseed crop used in jet fuel.
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
A molecular mechanism involved in cellular proliferation characterized
Researchers from Guillermo Montoya's team at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, in collaboration with Isabelle Vernos' Group from the CRG, have uncovered the molecular interaction between TACC3 and chTOG, key proteins in forming the internal cellular framework that enables and sustains cell division. Published today in Nature Communications, the observations may help to optimize current oncological therapies specifically designed to fight against this framework, named by the scientific community as microtubules.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Genetics
Genetic modifier affects colon tumor formation
Kristi Neufeld studies the adenomatous polyposis coli protein, which protects against colon cancer. Many of her experiments involve testing mice with APC mutations, which cause colon cancer, and seeing if any new drug compounds will work against the mutations.

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
blynch@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Transplant drug could boost the power of brain tumor treatments, U-M study finds
Every day, organ transplant patients around the world take a drug called rapamycin to keep their immune systems from rejecting their new kidneys and hearts. New research suggests that the same drug could help brain tumor patients by boosting the effect of new immune-based therapies.
National Institutes of Health, University of Michigan, Phase One Foundation

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Trial shows trastuzumab should remain as standard of care for HER2-positive breast cancer
Analysis of more than 8,000 women who participated in the world's largest study of two treatments for HER2-positive breast cancer reinforces other findings from the clinical trial showing that trastuzumab, also known as Herceptin, should remain the standard of care for this cancer, says a Mayo Clinic researcher.
Breast Cancer Intergroup of North America, Breast International Group, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Glaxo SmithKline

Contact: Paul Scotti
scotti.paul@mayo.edu
904-953-0199
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Nature Methods
Experts from CNIO discover shining cells responsible for developing tumors
Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have discovered and characterized a new specific marker for cancer stem cells: riboflavin, or vitamin B2, a pigment that emits green fluorescence as a result of its accumulation inside intracellular vesicles. This light emission property, acts to track, isolate, and later purify it, without the need for antibodies or other more costly and complex techniques.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 28-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Pertuzumab adds 16 months survival benefit to trastuzumab and chemo treatment for HER2-positive breast cancer
Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other parts of their body live around 16 months longer if treated with a combination of pertuzumab, trastuzumab and chemotherapy compared to those treated with trastuzumab and chemotherapy alone, updated results from the CLEOPATRA study reveal.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 28-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
IMPRESS trial data on continuing tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy after resistance development in lung cancer reported
Patients whose lung cancer has developed resistance to the drug gefitinib experience no statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival from continued treatment with the drug in addition to chemotherapy, a phase III trial presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress has shown.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 28-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Many patients lack information about the use of targeted therapies, oncologists say
More than three quarters of oncology specialists in Europe, South America and Asia believe their patients are not always well enough informed about the treatment options available to them, survey results have revealed at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 28-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Under-representation of women in oncology leadership positions
A growing number of oncologists in Greece are female, but women continue to be under-represented in leadership positions, according to a survey reported at the ESMO 2014 Congress.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 28-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Adding cediranib to chemo improves progression-free survival for meta or recurrent cervical cancer
For patients with cervical cancer that has recurred after treatment or has spread elsewhere in the body, adding the experimental drug cediranib to standard chemotherapy improves tumour shrinkage and adds a modest improvement in progression-free survival, researchers report at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Showing releases 226-250 out of 1264.

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