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Showing releases 26-50 out of 1240.

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Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
Loss of Y chromosome associated with higher mortality and cancer in men
Age-related loss of the Y chromosome from blood cells, a frequent occurrence among elderly men, is associated with elevated risk of various cancers and earlier death, according to research presented at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
press@ashg.org
301-634-7346
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
2014 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium
Early palliative care can cut hospital readmissions for cancer patients
Doctors at Duke University Hospital have developed a new collaborative model in cancer care that reduced the rates at which patients were sent to intensive care or readmitted to the hospital after discharge. The Duke researchers shared their findings today at the Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
Triplet threat from the sun
The most obvious effects of too much sun exposure are cosmetic, like wrinkled and rough skin. Some damage, however, goes deeper -- ultraviolet light can damage DNA and cause proteins in the body to break down into smaller, sometimes harmful pieces that may also damage DNA, increasing the risk of skin cancer and cataracts. Understanding the specific pathways by which this degradation occurs is an important step in developing protective mechanisms against it.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Proteome Research
New analysis methodology may revolutionize breast cancer therapy
Stroma cells are derived from connective tissue and may critically influence tumor growth. This knowledge is not new. However, bioanalyst Christopher Gerner and an interdisciplinary team from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have developed a novel methodology for investigation. Using modern mass spectrometry, tumor-promoting activities from breast fibroblasts were directly determined from needle biopsy samples. Recently this experimental break-through is published in the renowned Journal of Proteome Research.

Contact: Christopher Gerner
christopher.gerner@univie.ac.at
43-142-775-2302
University of Vienna

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Diabetes
Resetting the circadian clock: Shift workers might want to skip high-iron foods
A study sheds light on higher incidence of metabolic diseases among those who work off-hours.

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Blood biomarker may detect lung cancer, study presented at CHEST 2014
A new study shows that patients with stage I to stage III non-small cell lung cancer have different metabolite profiles in their blood than those of patients who are at risk but do not have lung cancer.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Detecting cancer earlier is goal of rutgers-developed medical imaging technology
A new medical imaging method being developed at Rutgers University could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology and shortwave infrared light to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer
An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Oct. 21, 2014
This edition includes, 'Three-minute in-office test accurately diagnoses delirium,' 'Physicians often unaware when patients' catheters are left in place,' 'Knowing individual risk does not increase cancer screening rates,' and 'Many common symptoms unrelated to disease,' published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Earlier unknown molecular-level mechanism may increase the growth of breast cancer cells
Researchers at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the University of Turku and the University of Oslo have discovered a previously unknown molecular-level mechanism that may partly explain the increased growth of cancer cells.

Contact: Dr. Marko Kallio
marko.kallio@vtt.fi
358-207-222-810
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Cytokine therapy enhances natural killer cell functions against tumor cells
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reveals that cytokine therapy enhances the activity of natural killer cells against tumors lacking MHC class I.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature
New study demonstrates advances in creating treatment for common childhood blood cancer
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center conclude new drug in development may offer first alternative to standard chemotherapy for T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Trastuzumab continues to show life for HER2-positve early stage breast cancer
After following breast cancer patients for an average of eight-plus years, researchers say that adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy significantly improved the overall and disease-free survival of women with early stage HER2-positive breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Genentech

Contact: Paul Scotti
scotti.paul@mayo.edu
904-953-0199
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Patients who have left breast tumors have comparable OS to those with right breast tumors
Tumor laterality (left-side vs. right-side) does not impact overall survival in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy, according to a study published in the Oct. 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice
Researchers have successfully transplanted 'organoids' of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice -- creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Reporting their results Oct. 19 online in Nature Medicine, scientists from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center said that, through additional translational research the findings could eventually lead to bioengineering personalized human intestinal tissue to treat gastrointestinal diseases.

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Biological clock disruptions increase breast cancer risk, UGA study finds
The disruption of a person's circadian rhythm -- their 24-hour biological clock -- has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, according to new University of Georgia research. The culprit, in this study in particular, is artificial light. 'Exposure to artificial light leads to a significantly higher risk for developing breast cancer,' said Chunla He, a biostatistics graduate student in the UGA College of Public Health.

Contact: Sara Wagner Robb
swagner@uga.edu
706-583-8149
University of Georgia

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Practical Radiation Oncology
Image guided radiation therapy is commonly used to ensure accuracy in treating pediatric tumors
Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a commonly used modality to ensure treatment accuracy in the management of pediatric tumors; however, consensus recommendations are needed in order to guide clinical decisions on the use of IGRT in treating pediatric patients, according to a study published in the September-October 2014 issue of Practical Radiation Oncology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Pitt/McGowan Institute team discovers stem cells in the esophagus
Despite previous indications to the contrary, the esophagus does have its own pool of stem cells, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an animal study published online today in Cell Reports. The findings could lead to new insights into the development and treatment of esophageal cancer and the precancerous condition known as Barrett's esophagus.
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, National Institutes of Health, McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cancer Cell
Human cancer prognosis is related to newly identified immune cell
A newly discovered population of immune cells in tumors is associated with less severe cancer outcomes in humans, and may have therapeutic potential, according to a new UC San Francisco study of 3,600 human tumors of 12 types, as well as mouse experiments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Food Additives and Contaminants A
Some rice-based foods for people with celiac disease contain relevant amounts of arsenic
Rice is one of the few cereal grains consumed by people with celiac disease, as it does not contain gluten. However, it can have high concentrations of a toxic substance -- arsenic -- as revealed by the analyses of flour, cakes, bread, pasta and other foods made with rice, conducted by researchers from the Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain. The European Union is working to establish the maximum quantities of arsenic in these products.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Modeling tumor dormancy
A new computational model developed in the laboratory of Salvatore Torquato, a Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University, may help illuminate the conditions surrounding tumor dormancy and the switch to a malignant state. Published today in PLOS ONE, the so-called cellular automaton model simulated various scenarios of tumor growth leading to tumor suppression, dormancy or proliferation.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) 2014 Annual Meeting
Simple test may predict surgical wound healing complications
A simple test called transcutaneous oximetry may be able to predict which patients with soft tissue sarcomas will experience complications while healing from surgery, potentially enabling surgeons to take extra precautions, a study has found.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Researchers develop personalized ovarian cancer vaccines
Researchers used new genomic analysis techniques to identify specific protein sequences, called epitopes, that the immune system can use to identify cancer cells. Their key insight was that the most effective epitopes to include in a personalized vaccine are not those that react most strongly with the immune system, but rather the epitopes that differ most from the host's normal tissue.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Krieger
kim.krieger@uconn.edu
860-486-0361
University of Connecticut

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1240.

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