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Showing releases 26-50 out of 1275.

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Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
High-dose interleukin-2 effective in mRCC pre-treated with VEGF-targeted therapies
High-dose interleukin-2 can be effective in selected metastatic renal cell cancer patients pre-treated with VEGF-targeted agents, reveals research presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cell Research
Discovery by NUS researchers contributes towards future treatment of multiple sclerosis
A multi-disciplinary research team from the National University of Singapore has made a breakthrough discovery of a new type of immune cells that may help in the development of a future treatment for multiple sclerosis.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
reillymb@ucmail.uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cancer
Adult survivors of childhood eye cancer experience few cognitive or social setbacks
Adult survivors of retinoblastoma, a type of eye cancer that usually develops in early childhood, have few cognitive or social problems decades following their diagnosis and treatment.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
'Dramatic' early phase 1 results for AG-120 in IDH1 mutated AML
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows 'extremely promising' early phase 1 clinical trial results for the investigational drug AG-120 against the subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring mutations in the gene IDH1.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
BioResearch Open Access
New treatments for cancer, diabetes, and heart disease -- you may have a pig to thank
Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. A Comprehensive Review article entitled 'Current Progress of Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Biomedical Research,' describing advances in techniques to create and use pig models and their impact on the development of novel drugs and cell and gene therapies, is published in BioResearch Open Access.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Selenium compounds boost immune system to fight against cancer
Cancer types such as melanoma, prostate cancer and certain types of leukaemia weaken the body by over-activating the natural immune system. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have now demonstrated that selenium -- naturally found in, e.g., garlic and broccoli -- slows down the immune over-response. In the long term, this may improve cancer treatment. The findings have been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Contact: Søren Skov
sosk@sund.ku.dk
45-28-75-76-79
University of Copenhagen - The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Lipid Research
UAlberta researchers stop 'vicious cycle of inflammation' that leads to tumor growth
A team of researchers from the University of Alberta has discovered a new approach to fighting breast and thyroid cancers by targeting an enzyme they say is the culprit for the 'vicious cycle' of tumor growth, spread and resistance to treatment.
Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, Alberta Cancer Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions

Contact: Ross Neitz
rneitz@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Study shows mental health impact of breast size differences in teens
Differences in breast size have a significant mental health impact in adolescent girls, affecting self-esteem, emotional well-being, and social functioning, reports the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry B
Cell's skeleton is never still
Computer models developed at Rice University show how microtubules age. The models help explain the dynamic instability seen in microtubules, essential elements in cells' cytoskeletons.
Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cancer
Survivors of childhood eye cancer experience normal cognitive functioning as adults
Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Possibilities for personalized vaccines revealed at ESMO symposium
The possibilities for personalized vaccines in all types of cancer are revealed today at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Novel regulatory mechanism for cell division found
A protein kinase or enzyme known as PKM2 has proven to control cell division, potentially providing a molecular basis for tumor diagnosis and treatment.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers
New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Clipping proteins that package genes may limit abnormal cell growth in tumors
Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Hutchinson Whampoa and the Human Frontier Science Program, Ellison Medical Foundation, Developmental Research Pilot Project Program at Mount Sinai

Contact: Lucia Lee
lucia.lee@mountsinai.org
212-241-7445
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Value in Health
New model of follow up for breast cancer patients
Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health system perspective.

Contact: Jon Karnon
jonathan.karnon@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-133-562
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Women's Health Issues
Women with serious mental illness less likely to receive cancer screenings
Study finds that women with symptoms of serious mental illness are 40 percent less likely to receive three cancer screenings: mammography, clinical breast exams and PAP smears.

Contact: Sharita Forrest
slforres@illinois.edu
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
PharmaMar presents results at EORTC-NCI-AACR to highlight a pipeline of targeted therapies
PharmaMar will present data at the EORTC-NCI-AACR for its drug Yondelis and several investigational compounds, highlighting its pipeline of targeted therapies. Some of the most relevant results showed will focus on the mechanism of action of Aplidin, a drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of multiple myeloma, and the activity of a new antibody-drug conjugate on HER-2 positive tumor cells and xenograft tumors.

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cancer Cell
A CNIO team discovers that a derivative of vitamin B3 prevents liver cancer in mice
Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), have produced the first mouse model that faithfully reproduces the steps of human HCC development. The results, published in the prestigious journal Cancer Cell, indicate that diets rich in nicotinamide riboside, a derivative of vitamin B3, protect these mice from developing HCC in its most initial stage, when genotoxic stress is damaging cellular DNA. They also show a curative effect of the diet in those mice that had previously developed the disease.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
Every step you take: STING pathway key to tumor immunity
A protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies in Immunity. The results have major implications for the growing field of cancer immunotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ludwig Cancer Research, Foglia Family Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
FASEB Journal
Antiangiogenic treatment improves survival in animal model of ovarian cancer
Coupling an antiangiogenic treatment with low-dose chemotherapy results in improved survival rates in an animal model of ovarian cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Ovarian Cancer Canada, BIDMC CAO Pilot Grant

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Angewandte Chemie
UC Irvine-Italian researchers create first inhibitor for enzyme linked to cancers
Recent studies showing acid ceramidase (AC) to be upregulated in melanoma, lung and prostate cancers have made the enzyme a desired target for novel synthetic inhibitor compounds. This week in Angewandte Chemie, a top journal in chemistry, UC Irvine and Italian Institute of Technology scientists describe the very first class of AC inhibitors that may aid in the efficacy of chemotherapies.
Carlsberg Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Moffitt researchers use evolutionary principles to model cancer mutations
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are taking a unique approach to understanding and investigating cancer by utilizing evolutionary principles and computational modeling to examine the role of specific genetic mutations in the Darwinian struggle among tumor and normal cells during cancer growth.
Physical Sciences in Oncology Centers, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
The STING of radiation
A team of researchers led by Ludwig Chicago's Yang-Xin Fu and Ralph Weichselbaum has uncovered the primary signaling mechanisms and cellular interactions that drive immune responses against tumors treated with radiotherapy. Published in the current issue of Immunity, their study suggests novel strategies for boosting the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and for combining it with therapies that harness the immune system to treat cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Ludwig Cancer Research, The Foglia Foundation

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1275.

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