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Showing releases 26-50 out of 1208.

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Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Lancet Oncology
Some older cancer patients can avoid radiotherapy, study finds
Some older women with breast cancer could safely avoid radiotherapy, without harming their chances of survival, a study has shown.
Chief Scientist Office

Contact: Anna Borthwick
anna.borthwick@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-2246
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Diabetologia
A cancer diagnosis makes diabetes patients less adherent to their prescribed diabetes drugs
Diabetes patients become less adherent to their diabetes medications following a diagnosis of cancer, concludes a new study published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. The research is led by Marjolein Zanders, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation, Eindhoven, the Netherlands, Jeffrey Johnson, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada and colleagues.

Contact: Marjolein Zanders
M.Zanders@iknl.nl
31-882-346-300
Diabetologia

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature
Epigenetic drug boosts chemotherapy's efficacy in some lung cancers
An existing drug may help some patients with non-small-cell lung cancer whose tumors have become resistant to chemotherapy, finds a study from Boston Children's Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The findings, in human cancer cells and in mice, suggest a window of vulnerability in NSCLC, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The work was published online today by the journal Nature.
Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Cancer Society, Boston University, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Human Reproduction
Sugary drinks linked to earlier onset of menstrual periods
Girls who frequently consume sugary drinks tend to start their menstrual periods earlier than girls who do not, according to new research published in Human Reproduction, one of the world's leading reproductive medicine journals.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Science Signaling
Lung cancer clues found in downstream pathway
A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center sheds light on the KRAS pathway with a potential target that might have more success at stopping lung cancer growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
ecancermedicalscience
What do medical journalists think about cancer research?
Researchers at the University of Tokyo, Japan sent self-administered questionnaires to 364 medical journalists, who described their experiences in selecting stories, choosing angles, and performing research when creating cancer-centered news pieces.

Contact: Katie Foxall
katie@ecancer.org
44-779-101-9469
ecancermedicalscience

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
JAMA
Targeted biopsy technique linked with increased detection of high-risk prostate cancer
Among men undergoing biopsy for suspected prostate cancer, targeted magnetic resonance/ultrasound fusion biopsy, compared with a standard biopsy technique, was associated with increased detection of high-risk prostate cancer and decreased detection of low-risk prostate cancer, according to a study in the Jan. 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: NCI Press Office
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Journal of Neurosurgery
Decisions on future childbearing in women diagnosed with a meningioma
Female meningioma survivors were surveyed to ascertain their personal attitudes toward childbearing and what influences may have played a role in their attitudes. The survey revealed that 43 of respondents 25-44 years of age were warned that pregnancy was a risk factor for meningioma recurrence. Nevertheless, these women were more likely to want a baby (70 percent vs. 54 percent) and intend to have a baby (27 percent vs. 12 percent) than same-age women in the general population.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Moffit Cancer Center

Contact: Jo Ann M. Eliason
jaeliason@thejns.org
434-982-1209
Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
BJU International
Smoking may increase risks for patients being treated for prostate cancer
Among patients with prostate cancer, those who smoke have increased risks of experiencing side effects from treatment and of developing future cancer recurrences, or even dying from prostate cancer.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
JAMA
Targeted MRI/ultrasound beats standard biopsy to detect high-risk prostate cancer
Targeted biopsy using new fusion technology that combines magnetic resonance imaging with ultrasound is more effective than standard biopsy in detecting high-risk prostate cancer, according to a large-scale study published today in JAMA.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Lancaster
klancaster@umm.edu
410-328-8919
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Analysis rejects linkage between testosterone therapy and cardiovascular risk
Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall.

Contact: Jerry Berger
jberger@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7308
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Drug combo suppresses growth of late-stage prostate cancer tumors
Low doses of metformin, a widely used diabetes medication, and a gene inhibitor known as BI2536 can successfully halt the growth of late-stage prostate cancer tumors, a Purdue University study finds.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Cancer Society, China Scholarship Council

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Novel radioguided brain surgery technique could help pinpoint cancerous tissue
A novel radioguided surgery technique could quickly and effectively identify residual cancer cells during brain tumor surgery, with low radiation exposure for both patients and surgeons. The study, featured in the January 2015 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, reports that Y-90 DOTATOC, a beta-minus-emitting tracer, can effectively delineate the margins of meningiomas and high-grade gliomas.

Contact: Kimberly Brown
kbrown@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
EMBO Journal
Prostate cancer: Androgen receptor activates different genes when bound to antiandrogens
The androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different sets of genes depending on whether it binds with an androgen hormone or an antiandrogen drug, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense, V Foundation, Ohio State University, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
darrell.ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
eLife
Cell mechanism discovered that may cause pancreatic cancer
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that defects in how cells are squeezed out of overcrowded tissue to die, a process called extrusion, may be a mechanism by which pancreatic cancer begins. From these findings, they may have identified an effective way to reverse the defective extrusion's effects without destroying normal tissues nearby. The results were published in the latest edition of the journal eLife.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Aagard
801-587-7639
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Molecular Cancer
Researchers find potential anti-cancer use for anti-epilepsy drug
Scientists at the University of York have discovered that a drug used widely to combat epilepsy has the potential to reduce the growth and spread of breast cancer.
UK Medical Research Council

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Researchers pinpoint 2 genes that trigger severest form of ovarian cancer
Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine create the first ever mouse model of ovarian clear cell carcinoma using data gleaned from the human cancer genome atlas. They show how when the genes ARID1A and PIK2CA are mutated in specific ways, the result is the most severe form of ovarian cancer 100 percent of the time. In their paper in Nature Communications, they also show that a known drug can suppress tumor growth.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Ovarian Cancer Research Fund/Ann Schreiber Mentored Investigator Award

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Blood
Keeping the Kraken asleep
Despite enormous progress in cancer therapy, many patients still relapse because their treatment addresses the symptoms of the disease rather than the cause, the so-called stem cells. Work in the group of Veronika Sexl at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna has given a tantalizing clue to a solution. In the current issue of Blood, the scientists report that the cell-cycle kinase CDK6 is required for activation of the stem cells responsible for causing leukemia.

Contact: Susanna Kautschitsch
susanna.kautschitsch@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1153
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
New model better predicts breast cancer risk in African American women
Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center have developed a breast cancer risk prediction model for African American women that found greater accuracy in predicting risk for the disease. The use of this model could result in increased eligibility of African Americans in breast cancer prevention trials.
The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How cancer turns good cells to the dark side
Rice University biophysicists reveal how cancer uses notch-signaling pathways to promote metastasis. Their computer models provide a fresh theoretical framework for scientists who study ways to target cancer progression.
National Science Foundation, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, The Keck Center for Interdisciplinary Bioscience Training of the Gulf Coast Consortia, The Sao Paulo Research Foundation, The Welch Foundation, The Tauber Family Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Cancer Research
An engineering approach from Virginia Tech helps breast cancer researchers at Georgetown
Biologists working with engineers and physicists have found a molecule they say helps determine if breast cancer cells that are resistant to antiestrogen therapy will live or die. Their study, published online earlier this month in Cancer Research, represents a major finding from a unique collaboration between Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and Virginia Tech that was designed to study the living cell as an information processing system.
National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen Grant

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
215-514-9751
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Clinical Cancer Research
Phase 1 clinical trial of CUDC-101 'throws kitchen sink' at head and neck cancer
At 18 months median follow up, one patient's cancer had worsened, two had died, and nine remained free of disease. Testing of blood and tumor samples showed that CUDC-101 had indeed inhibited the action of EGFR, HDAC and Her2.
Curis, Inc.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Inherited gene variation helps explain drug toxicity in patients of East Asian ancestry
About 10 percent of young leukemia patients of East Asian ancestry inherit a gene variation that is associated with reduced tolerance of a drug that is indispensable for curing acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which is being published online today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
National Institutes of Health, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Study finds potential new drug target for lung cancer
A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a key enzyme and its associated metabolic programming may lead to novel drug development to treat lung cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/Common Fund

Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
American Journal of Roentgenology
Is head CT overused in emergency departments?
Most patients presenting to the emergency department with syncope or dizziness may not benefit from head CT unless they are older, have a focal neurologic deficit, or have a history of recent head trauma.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1208.

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