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Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Cancer
Study finds decreased rates of high-grade cervical lesions in young women
A new analysis indicates that rates of high-grade cervical lesions decreased in young US women after vaccines were made available to protect against human papillomavirus (HPV), but the trend may be due in part to changes in cervical cancer screening recommendations.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Higher sTNF-RII associated with reduced memory functioning among breast cancer patients before treatment
Pretreatment cytokine levels, specifically soluble TNF receptor type two (sTNF-RII), are associated with reduced memory performance among newly-diagnosed, post-menopausal breast cancer (BC) patients prior to receipt of surgery and/or adjuvant therapy, according to a new study published June 22 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Cell Reports
Supercomputers surprisingly link DNA crosses to cancer
Supercomputers have helped scientists find a surprising link between cross-shaped (or cruciform) pieces of DNA and human cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin).
National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Cell
Discovery promises new treatments to thwart colon cancer
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered how an immune system protein, called AIM2 (Absent in Melanoma 2), plays a role in determining the aggressiveness of colon cancer. They found that AIM2 deficiency causes uncontrolled proliferation of intestinal cells. Surprisingly, they also discovered that AIM2 influences the microbiota -- the population of gut bacteria -- apparently fostering the proliferation of 'good' bacteria that can protect against colon cancer.
National Institutes of Health, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Oncogene
Moffitt researchers discover mechanism leading to BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma
The development of targeted therapies has significantly improved the survival of melanoma patients over the last decade; however, patients often relapse because many therapies do not kill all of the tumor cells, and the remaining cells adapt to treatment and become resistant. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a novel mechanism that can lead melanoma cells to develop resistance to drugs that target the protein BRAF.
National Insitutes of Health

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kimberly.Polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Journal of Cancer Education
Latina women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer need more stress management tools
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, along with collaborators at the University of South Florida, recently published a study about the attitudes and cultural perspectives of Latinas undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer. The article also discusses their cancer experiences and the ways they manage stress associated with cancer.
Komen for the Cure

Contact: Kimberly Polacek
Kimberly.Polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Faster, not stronger: How a protein regulates gene expression
By measuring the motion of single molecules, EPFL scientists have discovered how specialized proteins control gene expression by binding and compacting discrete parts of DNA inside the cell. The findings have significant implications for genetics and cancer research.
Sandoz Family Foundation, Swiss National Science Foundation, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell
TSRI research leads to 3-D structures of key molecule implicated in diseases of the brain
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have teamed up with several other institutions and pharmaceutical companies, to publish the first 3-D structures of a receptor implicated in many diseases of the brain and in normal physiology throughout the body. Surprisingly, the structures revealed a new understanding of the body's use of cannabinoids -- a naturally produced substance chemically related to marijuana.
National Institutes of Health, Ono Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell Metabolism
Diet that mimics fasting appears to slow aging
Study shows broad health benefits from periodic use of diet that mimics fasting in mice and yeast -- which appear to translate to humans, also.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Tubal ligation may improve the prognosis of endometrial cancer later in life
Endometrial cancer (EC) can spread by several routes, including the lymph system, blood vessels, through the uterine wall, as well as through the fallopian tubes into the peritoneal cavity, but the association of transtubal dissemination of EC with cancer stage, histological type, and mortality is unknown.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Blood
Study: Abdominal blood clots may indicate undiagnosed cancer
New research published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, concludes that a blood clot in an abdominal vein may be an indicator of undiagnosed cancer. The study also suggests that these clots predict poorer survival in patients with liver and pancreatic cancer.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
202-552-4914
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell
A single gene turns colorectal cancer cells back into normal tissue in mice
Anti-cancer strategies generally involve killing off tumor cells. However, cancer cells may instead be coaxed to turn back into normal tissue simply by reactivating a single gene, according to a study published June 18 in the journal Cell. Researchers found that restoring normal levels of a human colorectal cancer gene in mice stopped tumor growth and re-established normal intestinal function within only four days.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-335-6270
Cell Press

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell
Genomic discovery of skin cancer subtypes provides potential 'signpost' for drug targets
Cutaneous melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, is now believed to be divided into four distinct genomic subtypes, say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, a finding that could prove valuable in the ever-increasing pursuit of personalized medicine.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell
Specific roles of adult neural stem cells may be determined before birth
Adult neural stem cells, which are commonly thought of as having the ability to develop into many type of brain cells, are in reality pre-programmed before birth to make very specific types of neurons, at least in mice, according to a study led by UC San Francisco researchers.
National Institutes of Health, John G. Bowes Research Fund, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell
Single enzyme's far-reaching influence in human biology and disease
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have made a surprisingly simple discovery: The modification of more than 100 secreted proteins is the work of a single enzyme called Fam20C. The finding is published June 18 by Cell.
National Institutes of Health, Welch Foundation, AIRC

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Small
Biomedical breakthrough: Carbon nanoparticles you can make at home
Researchers have found an easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that are small enough to evade the body's immune system, reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection, and carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues. The new approach generates the particles in a few hours and uses only a handful of ingredients, including store-bought molasses.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
New tool on horizon for surgeons treating cancer patients
Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
JAMA Oncology
Parkinson's disease appears associated with many cancers in Taiwan
Parkinson's disease appeared associated with 16 types of cancer in a study in Taiwan, an effort to explain the association in an East Asian population because most prior research has been conducted in Western populations, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Pan-Chyr Yang, M.D., Ph.D.
pcyang@ntu.edu.tw
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Genetics
Massively parallel gene function assays aim to reduce uncertainty of genetic diagnoses
Patients seeking certainty in genetic tests often receive a perplexing result. Many learn they carry a 'variant of unknown significance' of a disease-linked gene. Such variants might -- or equally might not -- increase disease risk. A study published in the June issue of the journal Genetics characterized nearly 2000 variants of the breast cancer-associated gene BRCA1, demonstrating the potential of a new approach for sorting out which variants are harmful and which are harmless.

Contact: Tracey DePellegrin
tracey.depellegrin@thegsajournals.org
412-760-5391
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Nature Genetics
Detroit researchers help identify gene mutation that can trigger lymphoblastic leukemia
After collecting data on a leukemia-affected family for nearly a decade, Children's Hospital of Michigan Hematologist and Wayne State University School of Medicine Professor of Pediatrics Madhvi Rajpurkar, M.D., joined an international team of genetic researchers in an effort to track down a mutation partly responsible for causing the disease. Their findings, recently published in one of the world's leading science journals, have 'major implications' for better understanding the genetic basis of several types of cancer, including leukemia.
National Institutes of Health, Postle Family Chair in Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorders

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell Stem Cell
Scientists identify progenitor cells for blood and immune system
University of California San Francisco scientists have identified characteristics of a family of daughter cells, called MPPs, which are the first to arise from stem cells within bone marrow that generate the entire blood system
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Future Oncology
Future oncology explores role of biomarkers and next generation sequencing
Highlighting the seismic shift in cancer research and treatment that is underway due to biomarkers and next generation sequencing, a special issue of Future Oncology offers multiple review articles summarizing the opportunities presented by improvements in molecular testing and analysis.

Contact: Leela Ripton
l.ripton@future-science-group.com
44-208-371-6090
Future Science Group

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
New biomarkers might help personalize metastatic colorectal cancer treatment
Metastatic colorectal cancer patients tend to live longer when they respond to the first line of chemotherapy their doctors recommend. To better predict how patients will respond to chemotherapy drugs before they begin treatment, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine conducted a proof-of-principle study with a small group of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. The results revealed two genes that could help physicians make more informed treatment decisions for patients with this disease.
Arthur Athans in the name of his wife, Barbara Mae Athans, National Institutes of Health, Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research and Conquer Cancer Foundation of ASCO

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
The Journal of Urology
Vanderbilt-led study finds significant drop in new prostate cancer diagnoses
A new study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators found new diagnoses of prostate cancer in the US declined 28 percent in the year following the draft recommendation from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) against routine PSA screening for men.

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Molecular Cell
Discovery may lead to targeted melanoma therapies
Melanoma patients with high levels of a protein that controls the expression of pro-growth genes are less likely to survive, according to a new study.

Contact: Lucia Lee
newsmedia@mssm.edu
646-605-5940
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Showing releases 251-275 out of 1375.

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