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Showing releases 251-275 out of 1258.

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Public Release: 27-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Afatinib improves progression-free survival in head and neck cancer
The tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival compared to methotrexate in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, the results of a Phase III trial show.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 27-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
New England Journal of Medicine
Crizotinib treatment effective against ROS1-positive lung cancer
Treatment with the targeted therapy drug crizotinib effectively halted the growth of lung tumors driven by rearrangements of the ROS1 gene in a small clinical trial.
Pfizer, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Uniting Against Lung Cancer, Swedish Research Council, Be a Piece of the Solution

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 27-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Cancer during pregnancy: Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are safe for babies, studies show
Children who are exposed to chemotherapy or radiotherapy while in the womb suffer no negative impacts on mental or cardiac development, international studies presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid have shown.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 27-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Anamorelin improve appetite and body mass in patients with cancer anorexia-cachexia
A new drug, anamorelin, improves appetite and body mass in patients with advanced lung cancer who are suffering cancer anorexia and cachexia, according to phase III data presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Protein 'map' could lead to potent new cancer drugs
Imperial chemists have gained fresh insights into how a disease-causing enzyme makes changes to proteins and how it can be stopped.
Cancer Research UK, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Medical Research Council, The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, European Union

Contact: Gail Wilson
gail.wilson@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46702
Imperial College London

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
Discrepancies in access to new cancer drugs revealed
Access to potentially life-extending cancer drugs varies significantly in different regions of the world, two new studies show at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
ESMO 2014 Congress
Annals of Oncology
More than 70 percent of young oncologists in Europe suffer symptoms of burnout
Across Europe, more than 70 percent of young cancer specialists are showing signs of burnout, the largest survey of its kind has revealed. The results, reported at the Congress of the European Society for Medical Oncology in Madrid, have prompted calls for serious action to address the issue at all levels.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Many patients excluded from clinical trials due to prior cancer, UTSW study finds
Lung cancer clinical trials exclude a substantial proportion of patients due to a history of prior cancer, as shown in an analysis by cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Strategy to reduce side effects in modern cancer therapy
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna has successfully developed a new strategy for reducing the often serious side effects of an important class of modern anticancer drugs -- tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The novel drug is supposed to restrict its activity with high selectivity to the malignant tumor.

Contact: Christian Kowol
christian.kowol@univie.ac.at
0043-142-775-2609
University of Vienna

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cancer Discovery
Calming down immune cells could hold key to melanoma treatment
Immune cells may be responsible for drug resistance in melanoma patients, according to research published in Cancer Discovery.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Greg Jones
greg.jones@cancer.org.uk
44-020-346-98311
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Human papilloma virus vaccination provides long-term protection
This edition of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International reveals that Yvonne Deleré of Berlin's Robert Koch Institute et al. have produced a systematic review that shows no decrease in protection over a period of five years following vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18.

Contact: Dr. med. Thomas Harder
HarderT@rki.de
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell Reports
NYU Langone scientists identify key factor that maintains stem cell identity
A protein implicated in several cancers appears to play a pivotal role in keeping stem cells in an immature 'pluripotent' state, according to a new study by NYU Langone Medical Center scientists.
New York Stem Cell Foundation, Lady Tata Memorial Trust for Leukemia, American Society of Hematology, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Mandler
Jim.Mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell Reports
New protein players found in key disease-related metabolic pathway
Cells rely on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway -- which senses the availability of nutrients -- to coordinate their growth with existing environmental conditions. The lab of Whitehead Member David Sabatini has identified a family of proteins that negatively regulate the branch upstream of mTORC1 that senses amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. The mTORC1 pathway is known to be deregulated in a variety of diseases, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell
Modified vitamin D shows promise as treatment for pancreatic cancer
Salk scientists find that a vitamin D-derivative makes tumors vulnerable to chemotherapy.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell Reports
Novel compound prevents metastasis of multiple myeloma in mouse studies
Dana-Farber scientists and colleagues find the compound olaptesed pegol can stop multiple myeloma from spreading in mouse models, potentially leading to a new approach in addressing the challenge of metastasis, one of the deadliest aspects of cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institue

Contact: Teresa M Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5653
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Simple blood test could be used as tool for early cancer diagnosis
High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a study by researchers from the universities of Bristol and Exeter.

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Risk of esophageal cancer decreases with height
Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer and it's precursor, Barrett's esophagus, according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Steigerwald
media@gastro.org
301-272-1603
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell
Researchers engineer 'Cas9' animal models to study disease and inform drug discovery
Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a new mouse model to simplify application of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for in vivo genome editing experiments. The researchers successfully used the new 'Cas9 mouse' model to edit multiple genes in a variety of cell types, and to model lung adenocarcinoma, one of the most lethal human cancers. A paper describing this new model and its initial applications appears this week in Cell.
National Science Foundation, The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Institute, MIT/Simons Center for the Social Brain, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7968
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
2014 AAO-HNSF Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO
Study: Widespread vitamin D deficiency in thyroidectomy patients
A new study from researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit finds widespread vitamin D deficiency among patients who undergo a thyroidectomy, potentially putting them at greater risk for developing dangerously low blood calcium levels after surgery.

Contact: Krista Hopson Boyer
khopson1@hfhs.org
313-874-7207
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
ChemBioChem
Chemists recruit anthrax to deliver cancer drugs
Researchers from MIT have found that with some tinkering, a deadly protein becomes an efficient carrier for antibody drugs.
MIT Reed Fund, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s+mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cancer Cell
USC researchers discover dual purpose of cancer drug in regulating expression of genes
Keck Medicine of USC scientists have discovered new clues about a drug instrumental in treating a certain blood cancer that may provide important targets for researchers searching for cures.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
323-442-2823
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
New research outlines promising therapies for small cell lung cancer
Two recently published studies by a research team at University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center have the potential to advance treatments for small cell lung cell cancer. This aggressive form of lung cancer has seen no treatment advances in 30 years and 'is a disease in urgent need of new drug therapies,' write the study's authors.

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell
How the ends of chromosomes are maintained for cancer cell immortality
Maintaining telomeres is a requisite feature of cells that are able to continuously divide and also a hallmark of human cancer. Telomeres are much like the plastic cap on the ends of shoelaces -- they keep the ends of DNA from fraying. In a new study published this week in Cell, researchers describe a mechanism for how cancer cells take over one of the processes for telomere maintenance to gain an infinite lifespan.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute for General Medical Sciences, Abramson Cancer Research Institute, Basser Research Center for BRCA

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Bacterial 'communication system' could be used to stop and kill cancer cells, MU study finds
Researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered that a molecule used as a communication system by bacteria can be manipulated to prevent cancer cells from spreading.

Contact: Nathan Hurst
hurstn@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
NCI/FDA lung cancer workshop leads to the innovatively designed clinical trials
The recent launch of two clinical trials offer innovative study designs for patients with lung cancer.

Contact: Murry W. Wynes, Ph.D.
Murry.Wynes@IASLC.org
720-325-2945
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Showing releases 251-275 out of 1258.

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