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Showing releases 276-300 out of 1427.

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Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
Clinical Cancer Research
Presurgery chemotherapy may make advanced ovarian cancers responsive to immunotherapy
Metastatic ovarian cancer patients treated with chemotherapy prior to surgery had altered immune cells in their tumors, and specific alterations identified suggest that immunotherapy given after chemotherapy may help in preventing the cancer from coming back.
Swiss Cancer League, European Research Council, Cancer Research UK, Barts and the London Charity

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
Cancer Research
Sylvester scientists provide proof of concept for potential new class of cancer drugs
A recent study led by scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, in collaboration with the Univerity of Maryland School of Pharmacy and StemSynergy Therapeutics, Inc., has identified a small-molecule inhibitor of the Notch pathway, paving the way for a potential new class of personalized cancer medicines. Aberrant activity in the Notch pathway contributes to the initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patrick Bartosch
patrick.bartosch@med.miami.edu
305-243-8219
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
Clinical Cancer Research
New imaging technique could ID additional ovarian tumors not visible to surgeons' eyes
A newly devised tumor-specific fluorescent agent and imaging system guided surgeons in real time to remove additional tumors in ovarian cancer patients that were not visible without fluorescence or could not be felt during surgery.
On Target Laboratories LLC

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
Clinical Cancer Research
Chemotherapy may boost immunotherapy power in ovarian cancer
Cancer Research UK scientists have found that women with advanced ovarian cancer may benefit more from immunotherapy drug treatments if they are given straight after chemotherapy.
Cancer Research UK, Swiss Cancer League, European Research Council, Barts and the London Charity

Contact: Simon Shears
simon.shears@cancer.org.uk
44-203-469-8054
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
AcademyHealth 2016
Allina Health presents LifeCourse developments at national conference
These are three new tools to help caregivers involved in late life care from LifeCourse in Minneapolis. LifeCourse is a multi-year study to test a unique whole-person approach to late life care.
Robina Foundation

Contact: Gloria O'Connell
gloria.oconnell@allina.com
612-863-4801
Allina Health

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer proves accurate biopsy guide
Prostate cancer is the leading cancer among men, second only to skin cancer. With surgical removal at the frontline of defense, oncologists are considering prostate-specific molecular imaging at the point of initial biopsy and pre-operative planning to root out the full extent of disease, researchers revealed at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
British Journal of Cancer
International Tree Nut Council funds study linking tree nut consumption to prostate cancer mortality
New study on nut consumption and prostate cancer published in the British Journal of Cancer.
International Tree Nut Council

Contact: Erin McGraw
erin@motionpr.net
312-670-8943
Motion PR

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
Sleep hormone helps breast cancer drug kill more cancer cells
Tiny bubbles filled with the sleep hormone melatonin can make breast cancer treatment more effective, which means people need a lower dose, giving them less severe side effects. In a new study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, researchers show that the bubbles, called nanostructured lipid carriers, made tamoxifen stronger and help it kill cancer cells.
Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

Contact: Aileen Christensen
a.christensen@elsevier.com
31-204-852-053
Elsevier

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Oncotarget
MicroRNAs help to predict disease progression in brain tumors
Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich have developed a new method of predicting disease progression in gliobastoma patients who have undergone standard treatment. Their findings, published in the journal Oncotarget, show that four miRNAs may hold the vital clue. An application for the corresponding patent has already been filed.

Contact: Dr. Kristian Unger
unger@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-3515
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New study explains how very aggressive cancer cells use energy to divide, move
A new study explains how cancer cells use energy to fuel this switch between motion and proliferation. The researchers identified for the first time a connection between a cancer gene that controls motility and how cancer cells metabolize energy to move and divide so quickly.
Metavivor Foundation, Avon Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, James S. McDonnell Foundation, Liz and Eric Lefkofsky Innovative Research Fund, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
CT-based calculations improve accuracy of PET for cancer patients
Cancer patients often experience significant fluctuations in weight and lean body mass (LBM). Neglecting to account for these changes can prevent clinicians from obtaining precise data from molecular imaging, but a new method of measuring LBM takes changes in individual body composition into account for better staging of disease and therapy monitoring, say researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Genes & Development
Starving cancer cells by blocking their metabolism
Scientists at EPFL have found a way to starve liver cancer cells by blocking a protein that is required for glutamine breakdown -- while leaving normal cells intact. The discovery opens new ways to treat liver cancer.
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Swiss Cancer League, Swiss National Science Foundation, Novartis Consumer Health Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Study identifies a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer
In this month's issue of the JCI, a team led by Julian Sage and Irving Weissman at Stanford University identified a molecular target that may stimulate a patient's own immune system to destroy lung tumors.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Geoffrey Beene Cancer Research Center, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, German Cancer Aid

Contact: Elyse Dankoski
press_releases@the-jci.org
JCI Journals

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Oncogene
New research provides hope for patients with hard-to-treat breast cancer
CANCER RESEARCH UK scientists have found a new way to slow the growth of the most aggressive type of breast cancer, according to research published in the journal Oncogene* today (Monday).
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Emily Head
emily.head@cancer.org.uk
020-346-96189
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Oncogene
Blocking PRMT5 might force resistant brain-tumor cells into senescence, study suggests
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute suggests that blocking an enzyme called PRMT5 in tumor cells could be a promising new strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma, the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association
Eating more whole grains linked with lower mortality rates
Eating more whole grains may reduce the risk of premature death, according to a new meta-analysis by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Blood
Study: Autologous stem cell transplant should be standard care for HIV-associated lymphoma
According to researchers, people with HIV-associated lymphoma who receive autologous stem cell transplant have similar survival rates and are no more at risk of serious complications compared to those without HIV receiving this therapy.

Contact: Stephen Fitzmaurice
sfitzmaurice@hematology.org
202-552-4927
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Cell Biology
Reclaiming the immune system's assault on tumors
One of the major obstacles with treating cancer is that tumors can conscript the body's immune cells and make them work for them. Researchers at EPFL have now found a way to reclaim the corrupted immune cells, turn them into signals for the immune system to attack the tumor, and even prevent metastasis.
Swiss National Science Foundation, Fondation pour la lutte contre le cancer, Swiss Federal Commission for Scholarships for Foreign Students, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Veterinary Comparative Oncology
A common enemy: Through clinical trials, veterinarian fights cancer in animals, humans
A Kansas State University veterinarian is conducting clinical trials to treat cancers in dogs, cats and other companion animals.
American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Foundation, Mark Derrick Canine Research Fund, Zoetis Animal Health

Contact: Jennifer Tidball
jtidball@k-state.edu
785-532-0847
Kansas State University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Genetics
Probing proteins' 3-D structures suggests existing drugs may work for many cancers
Examining databases of proteins' 3-D shapes, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified more than 850 DNA mutations that appear to be linked to cancer. The information may expand the number of cancer patients who can benefit from existing drugs.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Genetics and Genomics of Disease Pathway at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
FDG PET evaluates immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer
Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Screening strategy may predict lethal prostate cancer later in life
Through a prospective study of US men, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have found that measuring PSA levels in younger men (between the ages of 40 and 59) could accurately predict future risk of lethal prostate cancer later in life. Their findings suggest that screening PSA levels in men at mid-life may help identify those who are at greater risk and should be monitored more closely.

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
2016 NCRAS the Cancer Outcomes and Data Conference
Middle-aged more likely to be diagnosed with advanced lung cancer
Younger patients aged 50 to 64 are more likely to be diagnosed with late stage lung cancer than older patients according to new data being presented at the Cancer Outcomes and Data Conference in Manchester today.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Paul Thorne
paul.thorne@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98352
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Adjuvant chemotherapy improves overall survival in patients with stage IB NSCLC
The use of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients improves overall survival and five-year OS in patients with tumor sizes ranging from 3-7 cm.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
Jeff.Wolf@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Mouse model shows that Notch activation can drive metastatic prostate cancer
Notch signaling is involved in prostate cancer and, in a paper published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions have shown that, in a mouse model of the disease, Notch promotes metastasis, or the ability of the tumors to spread to other organs.

Contact: Graciela Gutierrez
ggutierr@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1427.

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