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Showing releases 301-325 out of 1413.

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Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
Sleep hormone helps breast cancer drug kill more cancer cells
Tiny bubbles filled with the sleep hormone melatonin can make breast cancer treatment more effective, which means people need a lower dose, giving them less severe side effects. In a new study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, researchers show that the bubbles, called nanostructured lipid carriers, made tamoxifen stronger and help it kill cancer cells.
Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

Contact: Aileen Christensen
a.christensen@elsevier.com
31-204-852-053
Elsevier

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Oncogene
New research provides hope for patients with hard-to-treat breast cancer
CANCER RESEARCH UK scientists have found a new way to slow the growth of the most aggressive type of breast cancer, according to research published in the journal Oncogene* today (Monday).
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Emily Head
emily.head@cancer.org.uk
020-346-96189
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Genes & Development
Starving cancer cells by blocking their metabolism
Scientists at EPFL have found a way to starve liver cancer cells by blocking a protein that is required for glutamine breakdown -- while leaving normal cells intact. The discovery opens new ways to treat liver cancer.
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Swiss Cancer League, Swiss National Science Foundation, Novartis Consumer Health Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Oncogene
Blocking PRMT5 might force resistant brain-tumor cells into senescence, study suggests
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute suggests that blocking an enzyme called PRMT5 in tumor cells could be a promising new strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma, the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association
Eating more whole grains linked with lower mortality rates
Eating more whole grains may reduce the risk of premature death, according to a new meta-analysis by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Annals of Internal Medicine
The most prolific perpetrators of elder abuse may be living among them
Researchers studying the prevalence of resident-to-resident mistreatment in nursing homes found that at least one in five elderly residents had experienced some form of verbal or physical mistreatment from other residents during a one-month surveillance period.

Contact: Cara Graeff
cgraeff@acponline.org
215-351-2513
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Oncotarget
Radiation and vaccination can magnify effects of immunotherapy
By combining local radiation therapy and anti-cancer vaccines with checkpoint inhibitors, researchers from the University of Chicago -- working with mice -- were able to increase the response rate for these new immunotherapy agents. This sequence of treatments could open up unresponsive tumors to immune cell infiltration, boosting immunologic control of tumor growth.
The Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Fund for Cancer Research, Rolfe Pancreatic Cancer Foundation, Foglia Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Cancer
Many family physicians have inaccurate knowledge about lung cancer screening
Although clinical trials have shown that lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) can detect lung cancers early and reduce lung cancer mortality, less than half of family physicians in a recent survey agreed that screening reduces lung cancer-related deaths.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Study identifies a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer
In this month's issue of the JCI, a team led by Julian Sage and Irving Weissman at Stanford University identified a molecular target that may stimulate a patient's own immune system to destroy lung tumors.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Geoffrey Beene Cancer Research Center, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, German Cancer Aid

Contact: Elyse Dankoski
press_releases@the-jci.org
JCI Journals

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Cell Biology
Reclaiming the immune system's assault on tumors
One of the major obstacles with treating cancer is that tumors can conscript the body's immune cells and make them work for them. Researchers at EPFL have now found a way to reclaim the corrupted immune cells, turn them into signals for the immune system to attack the tumor, and even prevent metastasis.
Swiss National Science Foundation, Fondation pour la lutte contre le cancer, Swiss Federal Commission for Scholarships for Foreign Students, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Genetics
Probing proteins' 3-D structures suggests existing drugs may work for many cancers
Examining databases of proteins' 3-D shapes, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified more than 850 DNA mutations that appear to be linked to cancer. The information may expand the number of cancer patients who can benefit from existing drugs.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Genetics and Genomics of Disease Pathway at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Veterinary Comparative Oncology
A common enemy: Through clinical trials, veterinarian fights cancer in animals, humans
A Kansas State University veterinarian is conducting clinical trials to treat cancers in dogs, cats and other companion animals.
American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Foundation, Mark Derrick Canine Research Fund, Zoetis Animal Health

Contact: Jennifer Tidball
jtidball@k-state.edu
785-532-0847
Kansas State University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Blood
Study: Autologous stem cell transplant should be standard care for HIV-associated lymphoma
According to researchers, people with HIV-associated lymphoma who receive autologous stem cell transplant have similar survival rates and are no more at risk of serious complications compared to those without HIV receiving this therapy.

Contact: Stephen Fitzmaurice
sfitzmaurice@hematology.org
202-552-4927
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Screening strategy may predict lethal prostate cancer later in life
Through a prospective study of US men, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have found that measuring PSA levels in younger men (between the ages of 40 and 59) could accurately predict future risk of lethal prostate cancer later in life. Their findings suggest that screening PSA levels in men at mid-life may help identify those who are at greater risk and should be monitored more closely.

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
FDG PET evaluates immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer
Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Mouse model shows that Notch activation can drive metastatic prostate cancer
Notch signaling is involved in prostate cancer and, in a paper published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions have shown that, in a mouse model of the disease, Notch promotes metastasis, or the ability of the tumors to spread to other organs.

Contact: Graciela Gutierrez
ggutierr@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Adjuvant chemotherapy improves overall survival in patients with stage IB NSCLC
The use of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients improves overall survival and five-year OS in patients with tumor sizes ranging from 3-7 cm.

Contact: Jeff Wolf
Jeff.Wolf@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
2016 NCRAS the Cancer Outcomes and Data Conference
Middle-aged more likely to be diagnosed with advanced lung cancer
Younger patients aged 50 to 64 are more likely to be diagnosed with late stage lung cancer than older patients according to new data being presented at the Cancer Outcomes and Data Conference in Manchester today.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Paul Thorne
paul.thorne@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98352
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 12-Jun-2016
New England Journal of Medicine
Antibody-based drug helps 'bridge' leukemia patients to curative treatment
In a randomized Phase III study of the drug inotuzumab ozogamicin, a statistically significant percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease had relapsed following standard therapies, qualified for stem cell transplants.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 12-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy may eliminate colorectal cancer
An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging are unveiling a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 12-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Blood test predicts success of neuroendocrine cancer therapy
Malignant neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare, notoriously difficult to treat, and associated with poor long-term survival. According to research presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, an investigative blood test could predict how patients will respond to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy before they commit to a course of treatment.

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
International Journal of Cancer
Cancer-causing virus strikes genetically vulnerable horses
A new study shows genetic differences in immune function partly account for why some horses get sarcoid tumors while others do not.
Morris Animal Foundation

Contact: Merry Buckley
mrb46@cornell.edu
607-256-5645
Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Damage to tiny liver protein function leads to heart disease, fatty liver
A UCF College of Medicine researcher has identified for the first time a tiny liver protein that when disrupted can lead to the nation's top killer -- cardiovascular disease -- as well as fatty liver disease, a precursor to cancer.

Contact: Zenaida Gonzalez Kotala
zenaida.kotala@ucf.edu
407-823-6120
University of Central Florida

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Clinical Cancer Drugs
Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in prostate cancer development and progression
The research article -- 'Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression: Insight to Therapy,' by Dr. Claudio Festuccia (University of L'Aquila, Italy) and published in Clinical Cancer Drugs, volume 3, issue 1 -- discusses experimental and clinical data on the pharmacological inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathways.

Contact: Faizan ul Haq
faizan@benthamscience.org
Bentham Science Publishers

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Cancer
Young cancer survivors are more likely to smoke than people without cancer history
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that cancer survivors who were diagnosed at adolescent and young adult ages are more likely to be current cigarette smokers than people who have not had cancer. The findings of this study are currently available in Cancer.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1413.

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