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Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Breast cancer survivors gain more weight than cancer-free women
Among women with a family history of breast cancer, those diagnosed with breast cancer gained weight at a greater rate compared with cancer-free women of the same age and menopausal status.
Breast Cancer Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Gunther
julia.gunther@aacr.org
215-446-6896
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
Trends in Biochemical Sciences
Defective telomeres are now being linked to dozens of diseases, including many types of cancer
Studying telomeres, the structures that protect the ends of chromosomes, has become a key issue in biology. In recent years, not only has their relation to aging been confirmed; defective telomeres seem to be linked to more and more illnesses, including many types of cancer.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Breast cancer survivors gain weight at a higher rate than their cancer-free peers
Breast cancer survivors with a family history of the disease, including those who carry BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, gained more weight over the course of four years than cancer-free women -- especially if they were treated with chemotherapy, according to a prospective study by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers.
Breast Cancer Research Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Valerie Mehl
mehlva@jhmi.edu
443-375-1991
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
ACS Nano
Magnetic nanoparticles could be key to effective immunotherapy
In recent years, researchers have hotly pursued immunotherapy, a promising form of treatment that relies on harnessing and training the body's own immune system to better fight cancer and infection. Now, results of a study led by Johns Hopkins investigators suggests that a device composed of a magnetic column paired with custom-made magnetic nanoparticles may hold a key to bringing immunotherapy into widespread and successful clinical use.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Troper Wojcicki Foundation, Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Fund for Cancer Research

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
Analytical Chemistry
A portable 'paper machine' can diagnose disease for less than $2
In the US and other industrialized nations, testing for infectious diseases and cancer often requires expensive equipment and highly trained specialists. In countries where resources are limited, performing the same diagnostics is far more challenging. To address this disparity, scientists are developing a portable, low-cost 'paper machine' for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, genetic conditions and cancer. Their report appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
13th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano
PET adapted treatment improves outcome of patients with stages I/II Hodgkin Lymphoma
Final results of the randomized intergroup EORTC, LYSA (Lymphoma Study Association), FIL (Fondazione Italiana Linfomi) H10 trial presented at the 13th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano, Switzerland, on 19 June 2015 show that early FDG-PET ( 2-deoxy-2[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography) adapted treatment improves the outcome of early FDG-PET-positive patients with stages I/II Hodgkin lymphoma.

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Anti-stress hormone may provide indication of breast cancer risk
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that women with low levels of an anti-stress hormone have an increased risk of getting breast cancer. The study is the first of its kind on humans and confirms previous similar observations from animal experiments.
European Research Council, Swedish Research Council, Region Skåne

Contact: Olle Melander
Olle.Melander@med.lu.se
46-704-546-820
Lund University

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Scientific Reports
New classification system for brain tumors
Despite modern chemoradiation therapy it is still very difficult to give reliable prognoses for malignant gliomas. Surgical removal of the glioma is still the preferred method of treatment. Doctors at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen's Department of Neurosurgery have now developed a new procedure for analyzing radiological imaging scans which makes it possible to predict the course of a disease relatively precisely. Their findings have now been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Contact: Katrin Piecha
presse@fau.de
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Advanced Materials
Nanospheres shield chemo drugs, safely release high doses in response to tumor secretions
Scientists coated nanospheres of the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel with a peptide shell that shields the drug as it travels through the circulatory system. When the nanosphere reaches a cancerous tumor, enzymes that enable metastasis slice open the shell to release the drug. The targeted delivery allowed them to safely give mice 16 times the maximum tolerated dose of the clinical formulation of paclitaxel and halted the growth of cancerous tumors.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Clinical Cancer Research
Dietary intervention primes triple-negative breast cancer for targeted therapy
A diet that starves triple-negative breast cancer cells of an essential nutrient primes the cancer cells to be more easily killed by a targeted antibody treatment, UW Carbone Cancer Center scientists report in a recent publication.

Contact: Susan Lampert Smith
SSmith5@uwhealth.org
608-890-5643
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nutrients turn on key tumor signaling molecule, fueling resistance to cancer therapy, Ludwig Cancer Research study shows
Tumors can leverage glucose and another nutrient, acetate, to resist targeted therapies directed at specific cellular molecules, according to Ludwig Cancer Research scientists studying glioblastoma, a deadly brain cancer. The findings, published in the July 13 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrate that nutrients can strongly affect the signaling molecules that drive tumors.
Ludwig Cancer Research, NIH/National Institute for Neurological Diseases and Stroke, Defeat GBM Research Collaborative, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation, Ziering Family Foundation, Ichiro Kanehara Foundation, and others

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Cancer Cell
New drug combo could make cancer more sensitive to chemo
Combining chemotherapy with new drugs that target a protein that helps cancer cells to withstand chemotherapy could drastically improve treatment, according to research published in Cancer Cell.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Greg Jones
greg.jones@cancer.org.uk
44-705-026-4059
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
19th International Conference on Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy
JAMA
Certain abnormal prenatal testing results and subsequent diagnosis of maternal cancer
In preliminary research, a small number of occult (hidden) malignancies were subsequently diagnosed among pregnant women whose noninvasive prenatal testing results showed chromosomal abnormalities but the fetal karyotype was subsequently shown to be normal, according to a study appearing in JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the 19th International Conference on Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Jeremy Lechan
JLechan@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
617-636-0104
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Cancer
Cancer survivors may face unique challenges when trying to adopt
A new study has found that cancer survivors' options for adoption may be limited by adoption agencies' policies.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Nature Genetics
Skin cancer marker plays critical role in tumor growth
New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the protein keratin 17 -- the presence of which is used in the lab to detect and stage various types of cancers -- is not just a biomarker for the disease, but may play a critical role in tumor growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Nature Medicine
VIB-KU Leuven-ULB researchers uncover genetic alterations in development of skin cancer
Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is one of the most frequent cancers in humans affecting more than half million new persons every year in the world. Transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell is caused by accumulation of genetic abnormalities in progeny of single cells. SCC arising from various organs are induced by carcinogens, such as tobacco and UV exposure.
FNRS, Télévie, Fondation Contre le Cancer, Fondation ULB, ERC, Fonds Gaston Ithier, Foundation Bettencourt Schueller, Foundation Baillet-Latour

Contact: Katrina Wright
katrina.wright@vib.be
32-476-929-706
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Young adults who survive cancer hospitalized more often than the general population
Up to 20 years after people in the 20-44 age group are declared cancer-free, they still have more hospitalizations than the general public, new research has found.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant, Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
ACS Central Science
Cancer discovery links experimental vaccine and biological treatment
A new study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has linked two seemingly unrelated cancer treatments that are both now being tested in clinical trials. One treatment is a vaccine that targets a structure on the outside of cancer cells, while the other is an altered enzyme that breaks apart RNA and causes the cell to commit suicide. The new understanding could help both approaches.

Contact: Ronald Raines
rtraines@wisc.edu
608-262-8588
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering
Chemotherapeutic coatings enhance tumor-frying nanoparticles
In a move akin to adding chemical weapons to a firebomb, researchers at Duke University have devised a method to deposit a thin layer of hydrogels on the surface of nanoshells designed to absorb infrared light and generate heat to destroy tumors. When heated by the nanoshells, these special hydrogels lose their water content and any drugs trapped within, creating a formidable one-two punch.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
19th International Conference on Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy
JAMA
Noninvasive prenatal testing may also detect some maternal cancers
A study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that genetic test results, as revealed by non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities, may detect underlying conditions in the mother, including cancer. The study reports on a case series of eight women who had abnormal noninvasive prenatal testing results. Their fetuses had normal chromosomes; retrospective genomic analysis showed the results were due to undiagnosed cancers in the mothers.
Illumina

Contact: Jeremy Lechan
jlechan@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
617-636-0104
Tufts Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Cancers caught during screening colonoscopy are more survivable
Patients whose colorectal cancer is detected during a screening colonoscopy are likely to survive longer than those who wait until they have symptoms before having the test.

Contact: Gina Steiner
gsteiner@asge.org
630-570-5635
American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Study links leisure time sitting to higher risk of specific cancers
Spending more leisure time sitting was associated with a higher risk of total cancer risk in women, and specifically with multiple myeloma, breast, and ovarian cancers, according a new study.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Nature
New cell division mechanism discovered
Canadian and British researchers have discovered that chromosomes play an active role in animal cell division. This occurs at a precise stage -- cytokinesis -- when the cell splits into two new daughter cells.
Medical Research Council, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canada Foundation for Innovation, Fonds de Recherche du Québec-Santé, Cole Foundation, INCa, Cancer Research UK, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Gynecologic Oncology
Online registry improves clinical research study participation
Research for Her, Cedars-Sinai's groundbreaking online registry that matches women with research studies and clinical trials, enrolled study participants more quickly when compared with traditional paper-based registries, according to new research published in the journal Gynecologic Oncology.

Contact: Cara Martinez
cara.martinez@cshs.org
310-423-7798
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Lancet Oncology
Liquid biopsy identifies mutations in colorectal cancer undetected in tissue biopsy
The CORRECT study, published ahead of print online today in The Lancet Oncology, is one of the largest trials to date comparing data provided by liquid versus tissue biopsy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients. According to the study, liquid biopsy (BEAMing technology) could become an essential tool for analyzing tumor genotypes in real time, and identifying significant mutations that occur during the course of disease and are not detected by tissue biopsy.

Contact: Amanda Wren
awren@vhio.net
34-695-207-886
Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology

Showing releases 301-325 out of 1303.

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