IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1339.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Annals of Internal Medicine
Little cost difference between tests to diagnose coronary heart disease
For patients with suspected coronary artery disease, computed tomographic angiography and functional diagnostic testing strategies have similar costs through three years of follow up. Results of this prospective economic study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Contact: Cara Graeff
cgraeff@acponline.org
215-351-2513
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Digestive Disease Week
Racial disparities found in liver cancer survival rates
Black patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common liver cancer, had a 33 percent increased risk of death compared to non-Hispanic whites. They also were far less likely to receive life-saving liver transplants, according to a new study being presented at Digestive Disease Week® 2016.

Contact: Aimee Frank
newsroom@gastro.org
301-941-2620
Digestive Disease Week

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Nature Immunology
Harnessing the 'Natural Killer' within us to fight cancer
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers, led by Dr. Sandra Nicholson and Dr. Nicholas Huntington, together with colleagues from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, are investigating ways to 'switch on' our Natural Killer cells. The researchers identified a protein 'brake' within Natural Killer cells that controls their ability to destroy their target tumor cells.
National Health and Medical Research Council, Victorian Government, Harry J. Lloyd Charitable Trust

Contact: Ebru Yaman
ebru.yaman@wehi.edu.au
042-803-4089
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Cancer
Many young adult female cancer survivors need more information and support to preserve their fertility
A new study indicates that many young adult female cancer survivors do not receive adequate information about their fertility as part of their survivorship care after completing treatment, despite having concerns about their ability to bear children in the future.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Digestive Disease Week
Colonoscopy prep may improve with some solid foods
There's good news for patients who dread the clear-liquid diet before a colonoscopy. A new study presented at Digestive Disease Week® finds that patients who ate certain solid foods, considered 'low residue,' were better prepared for their colonoscopies than individuals who followed the conventional liquid diet.

Contact: Aimee Frank
newsroom@gastro.org
301-941-2620
Digestive Disease Week

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Cancer Discovery
Investigational CDK4/6 inhibitor abemaciclib is active against a range of cancer types
The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial.
Eli Lilly and Company

Contact: Lauren Riley
lauren.riley@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Pediatrics
Evidence of link between cancer & light therapy inconclusive but warrants consideration
Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing it for infants whose jaundice will likely resolve on its own, according to an editorial in Pediatrics. The suggestion of a link, however, should not deter use of the treatment, also known as phototherapy, in babies who otherwise would be at risk of brain damage or hearing loss.

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 23-May-2016
European Society of Human Genetics Conference 2016
American Journal of Human Genetics
Loss of Y chromosome in blood cells associated with developing Alzheimer's disease
Men with blood cells that do not carry the Y chromosome are at greater risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. This is in addition to an increased risk of death from other causes, including many cancers. These new findings by researchers at Uppsala University could lead to a simple test to identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Contact: Jan Dumanski
jan.dumanski@igp.uu.se
46-704-250-616
Uppsala University

Public Release: 23-May-2016
European Society of Human Genetics Conference 2016
American Journal of Human Genetics
Loss of Y chromosome in blood is associated with developing Alzheimer's disease
Men with blood cells that do not carry the Y chromosome are at greater risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and this is in addition to an increased risk of death from other causes, including many cancers, the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics will hear today.
European Research Council, Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare Foundation, Swedish Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Swedish Cancer Society, Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation, and others

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 22-May-2016
European Society of Human Genetics Conference 2016
Dietary experiments in mice point the way to early detection of cancer in humans
Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world, mainly because it is usually diagnosed too late. Finding ways to identify those people who are at increased risk of developing colon cancer is therefore crucial, a researcher will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today.
European Research Council, Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Technology
Two-stage nanoparticle delivery of piperlongumine and TRAIL anti-cancer therapy
New combination approach of nanoparticles and liposomes successfully deliver a potent TRAIL sensitizer followed by the anti-cancer protein TRAIL.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Leukemia
Researchers reveal how a new class of drugs kills cancer cells
A team of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers has worked out how a new class of anti-cancer drugs kills cancer cells, a finding that helps explain how cancer cells may become resistant to treatment.
Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, Cancer Council Victoria, Leukaemia and Lymphoma Society, China Scholarship Council, Australian Cancer Research Foundation, Victorian Government

Contact: Ebru Yaman
ebru.yaman@wehi.edu.au
042-803-4089
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Cell
You are what you eat: Immune cells remember their first meal
Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response -- a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases.
Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Simon Davies
simon.l.davies@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Technology
An integrated inertial microfluidic vortex sorter
A novel microfluidic device enables automatic double extraction and purification of target cells, serving as a powerful tool for cellular sample preparation in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Scientific Reports
Taking control of key protein stifles cancer spread in mice
In a new study in mice, researchers overcame a process by which cancer co-opts a fundamental protein into protecting it against the body's defenses.
National Institutes of Health, Korea Drug Development Fund

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Nanomedicine - Future Medicine
Tiny packages may pack powerful treatment for brain tumors
A study using nanotechnology to treat brain tumors got such good results, the researchers initially questioned themselves. But further testing showed the results held up.

Contact: Dawn Brazell
brazell@musc.edu
843-792-3622
Medical University of South Carolina

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Cell
Liquid order: Fluid self-organizes into structure that controls cell growth and health
Princeton Professor Clifford Brangwynne and colleagues have discovered how the nucleolus, an organelle with the consistency of honey, maintains a complex internal structure.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Helen Hay Whitney Foundation

Contact: john sullivan
js29@princeton.edu
609-258-4597
Princeton University, Engineering School

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Molecular Cell
Breaking down cancer cell defenses
The mistaken activation of certain cell-surface receptors contributes to a variety of human cancers. Knowing more about the activation process has led researchers to be able to induce greater vulnerability by cancer cells to an existing first-line treatment for cancers (mainly lung) driven by a receptor called EGFR.
National Institute for Health, American Cancer Society, Department of Defense

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Nanoscale
Nanotubes are beacons in cancer-imaging technique
Strong LED light, a unique detector and targeted nanotubes combine to offer a new way to pinpoint the location of cancer tumors, according to Rice University scientists.
National Science Foundation, Welch Foundation, National Institutes of Health, John S. Dunn Foundation Collaborative Research Award Program

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Cell
Immune cells help reverse chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer
New research explains why ovarian cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy. The findings suggesting the potential to harness immunotherapy as a future treatment option.
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research, Barbara and Don Leclair

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Current Urology
In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic surgery reduces risk of blood loss
In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic-assisted surgery to remove the prostate reduces the risk of blood loss and prolonged hospital stays, a Loyola Medicine study has found.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 19-May-2016
Organic Electronics
Electronic device detects molecules linked to cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
A biosensor developed by researchers at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory in Campinas, Brazil, has been proven capable of detecting molecules associated with neurodegenerative diseases and some types of cancer. The device is a single-layer organic nanometer-scale transistor on a glass slide. It contains the reduced form of the peptide glutathione, which reacts in a specific way when it comes into contact with the enzyme glutathione S-transferase, linked to Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and breast cancer, among other diseases.
São Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Samuel Antenor
samuel@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 19-May-2016
Scientific Reports
More light on cancer
The group of Russian and French researchers, with the participation of scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, has succeeded to synthesize nanoparticles of ultrapure silicon, which exhibited the property of efficient photoluminescence, i.e., secondary light emission after photoexcitation.

Contact: Vladimir Koryagin
science-release@rector.msu.ru
Lomonosov Moscow State University

Public Release: 19-May-2016
Cancer Research
Mouse study: Triple-therapy cocktail shrinks triple-negative breast tumors
In a new study using mice and lab-grown human cells, a scientific team led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers show how a triple-drug cocktail can shrink triple-negative breast cancers by killing off cancer cells and halting new tumor growth.
Department of Defense BCRP Center of Excellence Grants

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-May-2016
Oncogene
Lab cell study shows that HOXA5 protein acts as tumor suppressor in breast cancer
Many breast cancers are marked by a lack of HOXA5 protein, a gene product known to control cell differentiation and death, and lower levels of the protein correspond to poorer outcomes for patients. Now, results of a new study by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists suggests a powerful role for the protein in normal breast cells, acting as a tumor suppressor that halts abnormal cell growth.
Susan G. Komen Foundation Leadership Grant, Department of Defense Center of Excellence, SKCCC Core grant, Avon Foundation Center of Excellence

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1339.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

EurekAlert!