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Showing releases 76-100 out of 1244.

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Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
International study identifies new genetic variants indicating risk for prostate cancer
An international data study co-led by Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California scientists and researchers in the United Kingdom has revealed 23 new genetic susceptibility locations indicating risk for prostate cancer.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
Genetic testing can identify men at 6-fold increased risk of prostate cancer
Scientists can now explain one-hird of the inherited risk of prostate cancer, after a major international study identified 23 new genetic variants associated with increased risk of the disease.
Cancer Research UK, Prostate Cancer UK, European Union, National Institutes for Health

Contact: Graham Shaw
graham.shaw@icr.ac.uk
44-207-153-5380
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature
Nature: New drug blocks gene driving cancer growth
When active, the protein called Ral can drive tumor growth and metastasis in several human cancers including pancreatic, prostate, lung, colon and bladder. Unfortunately, drugs that block its activity are not available. A study published today in the journal Nature uses a novel approach to target the activation of these Ral proteins.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Advanced esophageal cancer patients who receive RT alone experience less problems when swallowing
Radiation therapy alone is as effective in decreasing swallowing complications experienced by advanced esophageal cancer patients as RT combined with chemotherapy, thus allowing patients to forgo chemotherapy, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Blood test for VEGF-A, TGF-B1 could help determine treatment options for esophageal cancer patients
A blood test may be beneficial in indicating neoadjuvant treatment regimens for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Genes & Development
UNC researchers find final pieces to the circadian clock puzzle
UNC researchers discovered how two genes -- Period and Cryptochrome -- keep the circadian clocks in cells in proper rhythm with the 24-hour day. The finding has implications for drug development for various diseases including cancer and conditions such as jetlag and season affective disorder.
National Institutes of Health, Science Research Council, Academia Sinica in Taiwan

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Shorter course of ADT for high-risk prostate cancer patients yields improved quality of life
High-risk prostate cancer patients who receive radiation therapy and an 18-month course of androgen deprivation therapy recover a normal testosterone level in a shorter amount of time compared to those who receive a 36-month course of ADT, thus resulting in a better quality of life and without detriment to long-term outcomes, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Patient-reported data shows RT does not increase risk of lymphedema in node-negative BC patients
A secondary analysis of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-32 trial indicates that radiation therapy does not increase the incidence of lymphedema in patients with node-negative breast cancer, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Manuka honey does not decrease pain of radiation-induced esophagitis for lung cancer patients
Patient-reported data indicates that when Manuka honey is prescribed for esophagitis pain during radiation therapy, it is not more effective than standard medical care, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Improved survival shown in early-stage Hodgkin's Disease patients who receive radiation therapy
Patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease who receive consolidated radiation therapy have a higher 10-year survival rate of 84 percent, compared to 76 percent for patients who did not receive RT; and, the data also shows a decrease in utilization of RT, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
The shadow of a disease
A biosensor for the scattered light of individual unmarked biomolecules such as proteins and tumor markers may facilitate medical diagnosis. The biodetector, that a team led by V. Sandoghdar has developed at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, uses the interferometric method iSCAT.

Contact: Vahid Sandoghdar
vahid.sandoghdar@mpl.mpg.de
49-091-316-877-200
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Re-expression of an embryonic signaling pathway in Melanoma utilizes different receptors
Re-expression of an embryonic signaling pathway in melanoma utilizes different receptors than normal embryonic stem cells providing new insights for therapeutic intervention.

Contact: Peggy Murphy
pemurphy@luriechildrens.org
773-755-7485
Children's Memorial Hospital

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Cell
A non-toxic strategy to treat leukemia
A study comparing how blood stem cells and leukemia cells consume nutrients found that cancer cells are far less tolerant to shifts in their energy supply than their normal counterparts. The results suggest that there could be ways to target leukemia metabolism so that cancer cells die but other cell types are undisturbed.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Diverse gut bacteria associated with favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites
Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit a more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites, which is associated with reduced risk for breast cancer, compared to women with less microbial variation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endocrine.org
202-971-3654
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Investigators from Montefiore and Einstein to present data at 2014 ASTRO Meeting
Members of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University's NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center will present new study findings at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) revealing the impact socioeconomic status has on radiation treatment compliance, predictive indicators for clinical outcomes and on radiation therapy duration and dosing recommendations. ASTRO is being held Sept. 14-17 in San Francisco.

Contact: Tracy Gurrisi
TGurrisi@montefiore.org
718-920-8274
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Cell
Researchers make scientific history with new cellular connection
Researchers led by Dr. Helen McNeill at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute have revealed an exciting and unusual biochemical connection. Their discovery has implications for diseases linked to mitochondria, which are the primary sources of energy production within our cells.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Sandeep Dhaliwal
dhaliwal@lunenfeld.ca
416-586-4800 x2046
Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Dartmouth research links genetic mutation and melanoma progression
Dartmouth researchers have found that the genetic mutation BRAFV600E, frequently found in metastatic melanoma, not only secretes a protein that promotes the growth of melanoma tumor cells, but can also modify the network of normal cells around the tumor to support the disease's progression. Targeting this mutation with Vemurafenib reduces this interaction, and suggests possible new treatment options for melanoma therapy.
National Institutes of Health, Norris Cotton Cancer Center Pilot Grant, Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award

Contact: Robin Dutcher
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
SpringerPlus
African American women receive less breast reconstruction after mastectomy
Dartmouth researchers have found that African American women are 55 percent less likely to receive breast reconstruction after mastectomy regardless of where they received their care
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Robin Dutcher
robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
European Journal of Cancer
Monitoring the response of bone metastases to treatment using MRI and PET
Imaging technologies are useful in evaluating response to cancer treatment, and this can be done quite effectively for most tumors using RECIST, Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. RECIST works well for tumors located in soft tissue, but not cancers that spread to the bone, e.g. prostate and breast cancers. More effort, therefore, is needed to improve our understanding of how to monitor the response of bone metastases to treatment using MRI and PET imaging.
Fondation Saint Luc, Fondation contre la Cancer, FRS-FNRS Télévie, French Ministry of Health, Cancer Research UK, National Institute of Health research UK, Fonds Cancer/FOCA Belgium

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature
Gibbon genome sequence deepens understanding of primates rapid chromosomal rearrangements
With the completion of the sequencing and analysis of the gibbon genome, scientists now know more about why this small ape has a rapid rate of chromosomal rearrangements, providing information that broadens understanding of chromosomal biology.

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
British Journal of Cancer
CNIO successfully completes its fisrt clinical trial on HER-2-negative breast cancer with nintedanib
The experimental drug nintedanib, combined with standard chemotherapy with paclitaxel, causes a total remission of tumors in 50 percent of patients suffering from early HER-2-negative breast cancer, the most common type of breast cancer.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
'Electronic skin' could improve early breast cancer detection
For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an 'electronic skin' that 'feels' and images small lumps that fingers can miss. Knowing the size and shape of a lump could allow for earlier identification of breast cancer, which could save lives. They describe their device, which they've tested on a breast model made of silicone, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Thyroid cancer rates in Pennsylvania rising faster than rest of country
Incidence of thyroid cancer is rising faster in Pennsylvania than in the rest of the United States, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Genomic analysis reveals that a high-risk leukemia subtype becomes more common with age
More than one-quarter of young adults with the most common form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a high-risk subtype with a poor prognosis and may benefit from drugs widely used to treat other types of leukemia that are more common in adults, according to multi-institutional research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Cancer, ALSAC, and others

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Chemistry & Biology
Discovery paves the way for a new generation of chemotherapies
In a collaborative study, researchers from the Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory at the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials, the University of California in San Diego and the Technische Universität München identified a new mechanism to inhibit proteasomes, protein complexes that are a target for cancer therapy.
Sao Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Samuel Antenor
samuel@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1244.

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