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Showing releases 76-100 out of 1250.

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Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer
An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Cytokine therapy enhances natural killer cell functions against tumor cells
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reveals that cytokine therapy enhances the activity of natural killer cells against tumors lacking MHC class I.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Oct. 21, 2014
This edition includes, 'Three-minute in-office test accurately diagnoses delirium,' 'Physicians often unaware when patients' catheters are left in place,' 'Knowing individual risk does not increase cancer screening rates,' and 'Many common symptoms unrelated to disease,' published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Patients who have left breast tumors have comparable OS to those with right breast tumors
Tumor laterality (left-side vs. right-side) does not impact overall survival in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy, according to a study published in the Oct. 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature
New study demonstrates advances in creating treatment for common childhood blood cancer
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center conclude new drug in development may offer first alternative to standard chemotherapy for T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Earlier unknown molecular-level mechanism may increase the growth of breast cancer cells
Researchers at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the University of Turku and the University of Oslo have discovered a previously unknown molecular-level mechanism that may partly explain the increased growth of cancer cells.

Contact: Dr. Marko Kallio
marko.kallio@vtt.fi
358-207-222-810
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice
Researchers have successfully transplanted 'organoids' of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice -- creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Reporting their results Oct. 19 online in Nature Medicine, scientists from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center said that, through additional translational research the findings could eventually lead to bioengineering personalized human intestinal tissue to treat gastrointestinal diseases.

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Biological clock disruptions increase breast cancer risk, UGA study finds
The disruption of a person's circadian rhythm -- their 24-hour biological clock -- has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, according to new University of Georgia research. The culprit, in this study in particular, is artificial light. 'Exposure to artificial light leads to a significantly higher risk for developing breast cancer,' said Chunla He, a biostatistics graduate student in the UGA College of Public Health.

Contact: Sara Wagner Robb
swagner@uga.edu
706-583-8149
University of Georgia

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Practical Radiation Oncology
Image guided radiation therapy is commonly used to ensure accuracy in treating pediatric tumors
Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a commonly used modality to ensure treatment accuracy in the management of pediatric tumors; however, consensus recommendations are needed in order to guide clinical decisions on the use of IGRT in treating pediatric patients, according to a study published in the September-October 2014 issue of Practical Radiation Oncology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cancer Cell
Human cancer prognosis is related to newly identified immune cell
A newly discovered population of immune cells in tumors is associated with less severe cancer outcomes in humans, and may have therapeutic potential, according to a new UC San Francisco study of 3,600 human tumors of 12 types, as well as mouse experiments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
A good diet before diagnosis is linked with lower mortality among OVCA survivors
Prediagnosis diet quality was associated with mortality and may have a protective effect after ovarian cancer, according to a new study published Oct. 14 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Pitt/McGowan Institute team discovers stem cells in the esophagus
Despite previous indications to the contrary, the esophagus does have its own pool of stem cells, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an animal study published online today in Cell Reports. The findings could lead to new insights into the development and treatment of esophageal cancer and the precancerous condition known as Barrett's esophagus.
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, National Institutes of Health, McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) 2014 Annual Meeting
Simple test may predict surgical wound healing complications
A simple test called transcutaneous oximetry may be able to predict which patients with soft tissue sarcomas will experience complications while healing from surgery, potentially enabling surgeons to take extra precautions, a study has found.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Food Additives and Contaminants A
Some rice-based foods for people with celiac disease contain relevant amounts of arsenic
Rice is one of the few cereal grains consumed by people with celiac disease, as it does not contain gluten. However, it can have high concentrations of a toxic substance -- arsenic -- as revealed by the analyses of flour, cakes, bread, pasta and other foods made with rice, conducted by researchers from the Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain. The European Union is working to establish the maximum quantities of arsenic in these products.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Researchers develop personalized ovarian cancer vaccines
Researchers used new genomic analysis techniques to identify specific protein sequences, called epitopes, that the immune system can use to identify cancer cells. Their key insight was that the most effective epitopes to include in a personalized vaccine are not those that react most strongly with the immune system, but rather the epitopes that differ most from the host's normal tissue.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Krieger
kim.krieger@uconn.edu
860-486-0361
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Modeling tumor dormancy
A new computational model developed in the laboratory of Salvatore Torquato, a Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University, may help illuminate the conditions surrounding tumor dormancy and the switch to a malignant state. Published today in PLOS ONE, the so-called cellular automaton model simulated various scenarios of tumor growth leading to tumor suppression, dormancy or proliferation.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
American Society of Clinical Oncology
Subsidies help breast cancer patients adhere to hormone therapy
A federal prescription-subsidy program for low-income women on Medicare significantly improved their adherence to hormone therapy to prevent the recurrence of breast cancer after surgery.
American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research
Pattern recognition receptors may be potent new drug targets for immune-mediated diseases
Chronic inflammation caused by activation of the human immune system contributes to a large and rapidly growing list of diseases including some cancers, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Significant advances in understanding the role that the cytokine-mediated JAK/STAT signaling network and pattern recognition receptors play in regulating immune responses and their potential as novel targets for developing potent new therapies are presented in a Review article in Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Genes and Development
Key moment mapped in assembly of DNA-splitting molecular machine
Scientists reveal crucial steps and surprising structures in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication.
National Institutes of Health, United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Ebola highlights disparity of disease burden in developed vs. developing countries
A recent study in Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology shows Ebola and other skin disease rates are hundreds of times higher in developing than in developed countries. The study highlights the need for disease monitoring even when the global burden of disease remains low.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Cryptic clues drive new theory of bowel cancer development
Melbourne researchers have challenged conventional thinking on how the bowel lining develops and, in the process, suggested a new mechanism for how bowel cancer starts. The researchers produced evidence that stem cells are responsible for maintaining and regenerating the 'crypts' that are a feature of the bowel lining, and believe these stem cells are involved in bowel cancer development, a controversial finding as scientists are still divided on the stem cells' existence.
National Health and Medical Research Council, Victorian Government

Contact: Alan Gill
gill.a@wehi.edu.au
61-393-452-719
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study reveals optimal particle size for anticancer nanomedicines
Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. In a recent study, researchers from the University of Illinois systematically evaluated the size-dependent biological profiles of three monodisperse drug-silica nanoconjugates to determine the optimum particle size for tissue penetration and tumor inhibition.

Contact: Jianjun Cheng
jianjunc@illinois.edu
217-244-3924
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
ACS Nano
Tuning light to kill deep cancer tumors
An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, Ph.D., at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. This promising new treatment strategy could expand the current use of photodynamic therapies to access deep-set cancer tumors.

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2688
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Showing releases 76-100 out of 1250.

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