IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 876-900 out of 1312.

<< < 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 > >>

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) 2015 Annual Meeting
Diffusion tensor MR tractography effective as quantitative tool, treatment marker response
MR tractography may be a reliable quantitative imaging biomarker to assess prostate cancer treatment response to androgen deprivation and radiation therapy.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) 2015 Annual Meeting
FDG PET/CT not useful in staging newly diagnosed stage III invasive lobular breast cancer
Although National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines consider 18F-PET/CT appropriate for systemic staging of newly diagnosed stage III breast cancer, the technique may not be equally valuable for all breast cancer histologies.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) 2015 Annual Meeting
DBT dramatically improves cancer detection rate in dense breast tissue
Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) increases the rate of cancer detection in women with dense breast tissue by as much as 67 percent, according to new research from the Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Breakthrough provides new hope for more effective treatments of HER2+ breast cancer
Ahmad M. Khalil, Ph.D., and his team identified the parts of the body responsible for revving up one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer, HER2+. Their findings appear this month in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment about 38 genes and molecules that most likely trigger HER2+ cancer cells to spread.
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
Jeannette.Spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
A 'forest instead of the trees' viewpoint may motivate change after negative feedback
The probability that an individual accepts negative feedback is dependent on construal level and perceived changeability of the feedback domain, according to new research.

Contact: Mike Swain
mswain@spsp.org
202-524-6543
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Cell Research
Beyond genes: Are centrioles carriers of biological information?
EPFL scientists discover that certain cell structures, the centrioles, could act as information carriers throughout cell generations. The discovery raises the possibility that transmission of biological information could involve more than just genes.
European Research Council

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Brain
Stem-cell-based therapy promising for treatment of breast cancer metastases in the brain
Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study published online in the journal Brain also describes a strategy of preventing the potential negative consequences of stem cell therapy.
National Institutes of Health, James McDonald Foundation

Contact: B. D. Colen
bd_colen@harvard.edu
617-413-1224
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Neurology
Drug prices to treat multiple sclerosis soar, point to larger problem
A study released today found that drugs used to treat multiple sclerosis have soared in price in the past two decades, in some cases more than 700 percent, even though newer drugs have come to the market -- a process that normally should have stabilized or reduced the cost of at least the older medications. The findings point to a systemic problem in the US pharmaceutical industry that leads to enormous, uncontrolled and rapidly increasing prices for some types of drugs.
Oregon State University College of Pharmacy

Contact: Dan Hartung
hartungd@ohsu.edu
503-494-4720
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Brain
Stem-cell-based therapy promising for treatment of breast cancer metastases in the brain
Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study published online in the journal Brain also describes a strategy of preventing the potential negative consequences of stem cell therapy.
National Institutes of Health, James McDonald Foundation

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
3rd ESTRO Forum
Combined brachytherapy techniques should be 'benchmark' for cervical cancer treatment
The first large international study to investigate the late side-effects of a combination of two forms of brachytherapy to treat cervical cancer has shown that the technique successfully delivers higher radiation doses to the tumor without an increase in treatment-related problems afterwards. The presentation at the 3rd Forum of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) in Barcelona suggests that the technique should be the 'benchmark' for treatment of the disease.
Varian, Nucletron

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
JAMA Oncology
Oophorectomy associated with decrease in breast cancer death in women with cancer, BRCA1 mutation
Removal of the ovaries, a procedure known as an oophorectomy, was associated with a 62 percent reduction in breast cancer death in women diagnosed with breast cancer and carrying a BRCA1 gene mutation, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Rebecca Cheung
Rebecca.Cheung@wchospital.ca
416-323-6400 x3210
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
American Surgical Association's 135th Annual Meeting
Annals of Surgery
Eligible for breast conserving therapy, many still choose mastectomy
New research led by Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that breast conserving therapy -- or the removal of less breast tissue via a lumpectomy -- was successful in more than 90 percent of patients with triple-negative breast cancer who became eligible for this procedure after treatment with chemotherapy. Despite these findings, 31 percent who were eligible for breast conserving therapy chose to have the entire breast removed via mastectomy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Cell
Brain tumor growth stimulated by nerve activity in the cortex, Stanford study finds
Deadly brain tumors called high-grade gliomas grow with the help of nerve activity in the cerebral cortex, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, McKenna Claire Foundation, Matthew Larson Foundation, National Science Foundation, Godfrey Family Fund in Memory of Fiona Penelope, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Erin Digitale
digitale@stanford.edu
650-724-9175
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
ecancermedicalscience
Cures and curcumin -- turmeric offers potential therapy for oral cancers
Curcumin, an antioxidant found in the common spice turmeric, has been found to limit the activity of human papillomavirus in oral cancer cells.

Contact: Audrey Nailor
audrey@ecancer.org
44-117-909-4608
ecancermedicalscience

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology
The past, present and future of pancreatic cancer research and treatment
Oncologists at the CNIO and the Huntsman Cancer Institute reviewed close to 200 scientific articles about this type of tumor that have been published over the past 30 years. The review addresses questions such as the use of immunotherapy or the possible systemic origin of this illness. Pancreatic cancer is rare, but it is one of the most deadly cancers with the highest mortality rates, and one of the lowest five-year survival rates.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Nature Genetics
Hundreds of cancer possibilities arise from common skin mole mutation
A team of international scientists has identified hundreds of possible new genes in mice that could transform benign skin growths into deadly melanomas.
National Cancer Institute, Agency for Science, Technology, and Research, Singapore,Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, Health Research Council of New Zealand, University of Auckland, New Zealand Maurice Wilkins Centre, Melanoma Research Allianc

Contact: David Bricker
dmbricker@houstonmethodist.org
832-667-5811
Houston Methodist

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Oncogene
'Humanized' mice will lead to better testing of cancer immunotherapies
New model reported in Oncogene, XactMice, uses human blood stem cells to grow a 'humanized' mouse immune system prior to tumor transplantation, allowing anti-cancer therapies to be tested in a much more human-like environment.
US Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
PLOS Computational Biology
Chance and circumstance tip immune control of cancer
A team of Northwestern University researchers developed a new computational model that elucidates the dynamic interplay between cancer and the immune system.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Pain
An end to cancer pain?
A new study led by University of Toronto researcher Dr. David Lam has discovered the trigger behind the most severe forms of cancer pain. Released in top journal Pain this month, the study points to TMPRSS2 as the culprit: a gene that is also responsible for some of the most aggressive forms of androgen-fueled cancers.

Contact: Erin Vollick
erin.vollick@dentistry.utoronto.ca
41-697-949-004-381
University of Toronto - Faculty of Dentistry

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Gastroenterology
Updates in liver disease research: Do you want the good or bad news?
The May issues of AGA's journals -- Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology -- highlight important research updates on the most deadly forms of liver disease.

Contact: Rachel Steigerwald
media@gastro.org
301-272-1603
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Science Signaling
New therapeutic target for a type of colorectal cancer with poor prognosis has been identified
Researchers at the Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques have identified a new way of treating colorectal cancer. In the study published in the journal Science Signaling, the team led by Luís Espinosa, investigator of IMIM's research group into stem cells and cancer, have shown that inhibition of endosomal activity is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with the BRAF mutated gene.

Contact: Marta Calsina
mcalsina@imim.es
34-933-160-680
IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
The Association for Molecular Pathology compiles current research on liquid biopsy
In general, the article supports the notion that this type of diagnostic testing in and of itself allows for earlier diagnosis, faster and more targeted treatment, reduced costs, and increased quality of life and even increased lifespan for the patient.

Contact: Nicole Litchfield
nicole@bioscribe.com
415-793-6468
Association for Molecular Pathology

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Nature Scientific Reports
Study illuminates role of cancer drug decitabine in repairing damaged cells
A Purdue University study sheds light on how cell damage is reversed by the cancer drug decitabine and identifies a potential biomarker that could indicate a patient's stage of cancer and response to treatment.
National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute/Cancer Prevention Internship Program, Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Thyroid
First guidelines from the American Thyroid Associationn: Managing thyroid nodules and cancer in children
Previous guidelines from the American Thyroid Association (ATA) for evaluating and managing thyroid nodules and thyroid cancers targeted adults. Recognizing the potential differences in clinical presentation and long-term outcomes, and the potential risks of overly aggressive therapy in pediatric patients with thyroid cancer, an ATA Task Force developed management guidelines for children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer, which are published in Thyroid.

Contact: Vicki Cohn
vcohn@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Nature
Toxic mushroom-based drug may help battle colorectal cancer
For some time, cancer scientists have considered the toxin, alpha-amanatin derived from 'death cap' mushrooms, as a possible cancer treatment. However, due to its penchant for causing liver toxicity, its potential as an effective therapy has been limited.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Showing releases 876-900 out of 1312.

<< < 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

EurekAlert!