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Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
JAMA
Study examines presence of uterine cancers at the time of hysterectomy using morcellation
Among women undergoing a minimally invasive hysterectomy using electric power morcellation, uterine cancers were present in 27 per 10,000 women at the time of the procedure, according to a study published by JAMA. There has been concern that this procedure, in which the uterus is fragmented into smaller pieces, may result in the spread of undetected malignancies.

Contact: Lucky Tran
cumcnews@columbia.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Bacteriology
Investigators identify genes that contribute to radiation resistance
A team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin have identified 46 genes in Escherichia coli that are necessary for its survival at exceptionally high levels of radiation. The paper appears ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Advanced cancer patients can benefit from programs combining exercise, nutrition
Patients with advanced cancer can benefit from a rehabilitation program combining exercise, nutritional counselling and symptom control, according to an evidence review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Palliative care programs should be expanded to include these elements and should be available to patients from diagnosis.

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116 x2224
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
Vanderbilt discovery may advance colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment
A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein 'signatures' of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Biological Education
Described novel regulator of a protein inactive in over 50 percent of human tumors
Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute and the University of Barcelona have discovered the interaction between HERC2 proteins with another protein called p53 that is inactivated in more than half of human tumors. The study results were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
0034-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Translational Oncology
Unique study focuses on combined treatment approach for locally advanced pancreatic cancer
Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute are developing a novel, multistep investigational treatment for one of the most complex and difficult-to-treat forms of the disease, locally advanced pancreatic cancer.
PHASE ONE, Diane V. Allen

Contact: Cara Martinez
cara.martinez@cshs.org
310-423-7798
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Increased overall survival for advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer patients is associated with availability of less toxic chemotherapy
A 10-year population-based study shows that increased availability of better systemic chemo- and targeted-therapies for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer coincides with increased usage of these therapies. This in turn leads to a significant increase in overall survival.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Urology
New accurate epigenetic test could eliminate unnecessary repeat biopsies for prostate cancer
More than one million prostate biopsies are performed each year in the US alone, including many repeat biopsies for fear of cancer missed. Therefore there is a need to develop diagnostic tests that will help avoid unnecessary repeat biopsies. Two independent trials have now validated the performance of an epigenetic test that could provide physicians with a better tool to help eliminate unnecessary repeat prostate biopsies, report investigators in the Journal of Urology.

Contact: Linda Gruner
e.leahy@elsevier.com
212-633-3923
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
ROS1 gene fusions are found in 2.4 percent of Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma
ROS1 fusion genes were successfully detected independent of gender or smoking history in young East Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a histological subgroup in non-small cell lung cancer, using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry diagnostic tests.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Scientists map one of most important proteins in life -- and cancer
Scientists reveal the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division - a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer -- in research published in Nature today.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Graham Shaw
graham.shaw@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35380
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Metabolic enzyme stops progression of most common type of kidney cancer
Researchers found that an enzyme called FBP1 -- essential for regulating metabolism -- binds to a transcription factor in the nucleus of certain kidney cells and restrains energy production in the cell body. What's more, they determined that this enzyme is missing from all kidney tumor tissue analyzed. These tumor cells without FBP1 produce energy at a much faster rate than their non-cancer cell counterparts.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Singapore scientists discover genetic cause of common breast tumours in women
A multidisciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore and Singapore General Hospital have made a seminal breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumours diagnosed in women. The team, led by Professors Teh Bin Tean, Patrick Tan, Tan Puay Hoon and Steve Rozen, used advanced DNA sequencing technologies to identify a critical gene called MED12 that was repeatedly disrupted in nearly 60 percent of fibroadenoma cases.
Singapore National Medical Research Council, Singapore Millennium Foundation, Lee Foundation, Tanoto Foundation, National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Cancer Science Institute Singapore, Verdant Foundation

Contact: Lydia Ng
lydia.ng.w.r@singhealth.com.sg
659-271-6175
SingHealth

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Bowel cancer breakthrough may benefit thousands of patients
Researchers at Queen's University have made a significant breakthrough that may benefit patients with bowel cancer. Dr Sandra van Schaeybroeck and her team have discovered how two genes cause bowel cancer cells to become resistant to treatments used against the disease. The research, which was funded by Cancer Research UK, was published this month in the prestigious international journal Cell Reports.

Contact: Claire O'Callaghan
c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Yale researchers identify targets for immunotherapy in early-stage breast cancer
Yale Cancer Center researchers used a new molecular analysis tool to detect the level of an important target for immunotherapy in early-stage breast cancers. The diagnostic test, using RNAScope, measures the amount of PD-L1 mRNA in cancer tissues and is devoid of many of the technical issues that plague antibody-based detection methods that have yielded conflicting results in the past. PD-L1 is the target of several novel immune stimulatory therapies in clinical trials.
Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Novartis/Genoptix

Contact: Vicky Agnew
vicky.agnew@yale.edu
203-785-7001
Yale University

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
A negative HPV test may predict lower cervical cancer risk than a negative Pap
In the US, cotesting for human papilloma virus and Pap testing for cervical cancer every 5 years for women aged 30-65 years is now recommended. However, human papilloma virus testing alone may provide better reassurance against cervical cancer than Pap testing alone and similar reassurance to cotesting, according to a study published July 18 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Physical Biology
Physicists reveal random nature of metastasis
The spreading of a cancerous tumour from one part of the body to another may occur through pure chance instead of key genetic mutations, a new study has shown.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Cell
Faithful cell division requires tightly controlled protein placement at the centromeres
The protein CENP-A, which is integrated into human DNA at the centromere on each chromosome, has a vital role in cell division. Work from Whitehead Institute Member Iain Cheeseman's lab describes how the vital and tightly controlled replenishment of CENP-A progresses.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Cell Metabolism
Brown fat found to be at the root of cancer-related wasting syndrome
Many patients with advanced stages of cancer, AIDS, tuberculosis, and other diseases die from a condition called cachexia, which is characterized as a 'wasting' syndrome that causes extreme thinness with muscle weakness. Cachexia is the direct cause of roughly 20 percent of deaths in cancer patients. While boosting food intake doesn't help, and no effective therapies are available, new research points to a promising strategy that may stimulate weight gain and muscle strength.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Cell
Gut microbes turn carbs into colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer has been linked to carbohydrate-rich western diets, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published in Cell shows that gut microbes metabolize carbohydrates in the diet, causing intestinal cells to proliferate and form tumors in mice that are genetically predisposed to colorectal cancer. Treatment with antibiotics or a low-carbohydrate diet significantly reduced tumors in these mice, suggesting that these easy interventions could prevent a common type of colorectal cancer in humans.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Cell Metabolism
One third of cancer patients are killed by a 'fat-burning' process termed 'cachexia'
Erwin Wagner's team at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center has uncovered that cachexia is triggered by a process thoroughly studied in the fight against obesity: the conversion of white fat into brown fat. The researchers also argue that reducing the transformation of fat tissue can improve the symptoms of cachexia. This approach can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies to treat cancer. These results are published in the journal 'Cell Metabolism'.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Cancer Cell
Tak Mak study in Cancer Cell maps decade of discovery to potential anticancer agent
The journal Cancer Cell today published research led by Dr. Tak Mak mapping the path of discovery to developing a potential anticancer agent.
The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Genome Canada

Contact: Jane Finlayson
jane.finlayson@uhn.ca
416-946-2846
University Health Network

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
CNIO researchers discover a gene that links stem cells, aging and cancer
An organism is healthy thanks to a good maintenance system: the normal functioning of organs and environmental exposure cause damage to tissues, which need to be continuously repaired. This process is not yet well understood, but it is known that stem cells in the organs play a key role. Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have discovered one of the key genes that make up the maintenance mechanism for tissues.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Lipoic acid helps restore, synchronize the 'biological clock'
Researchers have discovered a possible explanation for the surprisingly large range of biological effects that are linked to a micronutrient called lipoic acid: It appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms, or the 'biological clock' found in most life forms.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tory Hagen
tory.hagen@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5083
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
University of Houston researchers create new method to draw molecules from live cells
University of Houston researchers have devised a new method for extracting molecules from live cells without disrupting cell development, work that could provide new avenues for the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. The researchers used magnetized carbon nanotubes to extract biomolecules from live cells, allowing them to retrieve molecular information without killing the individual cells.

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Molecular Cell
New gene discovered that stops the spread of deadly cancer
Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers.

Contact: Kristina Grifantini
press@salk.edu
858-453-4100 x1226
Salk Institute

Showing releases 876-900 out of 1275.

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