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Showing releases 901-925 out of 1267.

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Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons
Most Internet sources on prostate cancer disagree with expert panel's recommendation
Only 17 percent of top-ranked consumer health websites advise against screening for prostate cancer, a recommendation made more than two years ago by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, according to a study presented at the 2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Higher copayments are associated with discontinuation of aromatase inhibitors
Discontinuation and nonadherence were higher among breast cancer patients taking brand name aromatase inhibitors vs. generic AIs, according to a new study published Oct. 27 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
New prostate cancer screening guideline recommends not using PSA test
A new Canadian guideline recommends that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test should not be used to screen for prostate cancer based on evidence that shows an increased risk of harm and uncertain benefits. The guideline is published in CMAJ.

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Cell Biology
A switch to dampen malignancy
Ludwig Oxford researchers have discovered a key mechanism that governs how cells of the epithelia, the soft lining of inner body cavities, shift between a rigid, highly structured and immobile state and a flexible and motile form.
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Medical Research Council UK

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Genetics
Unsuspected gene found frequently mutated in colorectal, endometrial cancers
Scientists say they have identified in about 20 percent of colorectal and endometrial cancers a genetic mutation that had been overlooked in recent large, comprehensive gene searches. With this discovery, the altered gene, called RNF43, now ranks as one of the most common mutations in the two cancer types.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Lancet Oncology
International research group publishes updated criteria for diagnosing multiple myeloma
The International Myeloma Working Group today announced that it has updated the criteria for diagnosing multiple myeloma. A paper outlining the new criteria was published in the journal Lancet Oncology. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell.

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Biosensors and Bioelectronics
New nanodevice to improve cancer treatment monitoring
In less than a minute, a miniature device developed at the University of Montreal can measure a patient's blood for methotrexate, a commonly used but potentially toxic cancer drug. Just as accurate and ten times less expensive than equipment currently used in hospitals.
National Science and Engineering Research Council, Centre for self-assembled chemical structures, Fonds québécois de recherche – Nature et technologies, Institut Mérieux

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stem Cells
Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, M.S., Ph.D., who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Prognostic factors identified for peripheral squamous cell carcinomas of the lung
A better survival outcome is associated with low blood levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, or absence of tumor invasion either into the space between the lungs and chest wall or into blood vessels of individuals with a peripheral squamous cell carcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Precise and programmable biological circuits
A team led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson has developed several new components for biological circuits. These components are key building blocks for constructing precisely functioning and programmable bio-computers.

Contact: Yaakov Benenson
kobi.benenson@bsse.ethz.ch
41-613-873-338
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Useful markers to predict response to chemotherapy in patients with liver cancer
A study led by the researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research, Isabel Fabregat, could serve to select patients with hepatocellular carcinoma unresponsive to most frequently used drug in liver cancer: sorafenib. The study, published in the International Journal of Cancer describes how tumor cells that have a less differentiated phenotype (mesenchymal) and expresses CD44, do not respond to sorafenib action.

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
34-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cancer Cell
Cancer exosome 'micro factories' aid in cancer progression
Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer
Federal Express and UPS are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution. There exists in cancer biology an impressive packaging and delivery system that influences whether your body will develop cancer or not.
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, American Cancer Society, National Basic Research Program of China, Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Center for Cancer Epigenetics

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
eScholarship
California's tobacco control efforts losing steam, finds UCSF report
California's position as a leader in tobacco control is under threat, according to a new report from the UC San Francisco Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education.

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Thyroid cancer genome analysis finds markers of aggressive tumors
A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Medical Care
62 percent of colorectal cancer patients report financial burden from treatment, study finds
Nearly two-thirds of patients treated for colorectal cancer reported some measure of financial burden due to their treatment, according to a new study. The burden was greatest among patients who received chemotherapy.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Novel software application can stratify early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients
Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool developed at Mayo Clinic that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung cancer patients into risk groups that have significantly different disease-free survival outcome.

Contact: Rob mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Dartmouth study measures breast cancer tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
A Dartmouth study suggests that it may be possible to use Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic imaging to predict which patients will best respond to chemotherapy used to shrink breast cancer tumors before surgery. These findings could eliminate delays in effective early treatment for tumors unlikely to respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
European multicenter harmonization study shows anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing
Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein expression test, immunohistochemistry, is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
TCGA study improves understanding of genetic drivers of thyroid cancer
An analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas -- the most common form of thyroid cancer -- provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other alterations driving disease development. The findings also may help improve diagnosis and treatment. Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified new molecular subtypes that will help clinicians determine which tumors are more aggressive and which are more likely to respond to certain treatments.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Fast modeling of cancer mutations
A new genome-editing technique enables rapid analysis of genes mutated in tumors.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Prostate
Finally: A missing link between vitamin D and prostate cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Prostate offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Current Oncology Reports
Cancer patients should not hesitate to speak with their doctors about dietary supplements
Many cancer patients use dietary supplements such as vitamins, minerals and herbs or other botanicals but often don't tell their doctor. This gap in communication can happen when patients believe that their doctors are indifferent or negative toward their use of these supplements. As a result, patients may find information about dietary supplements from unreliable sources, exposing themselves to unneeded risks. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers describe a practical patient-centered approach to managing dietary supplement use in cancer care in a review article.

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
UTMB researchers uncover powerful new class of weapons in the war on cancer
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch, and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have identified small molecules that can represent a new class of anticancer drugs with a novel target for the treatment of lung cancer. These findings are detailed in Nature Communications. A PCT patent was jointly documented by these two Institutes for the invention.
National Institutes of Health, Emory University, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1267.

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