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Showing releases 901-925 out of 1302.

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Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Cell Reports
Johns Hopkins biologist leads research shedding light on stem cells
A research team reports progress in understanding the mysterious shape-shifting ways of stem cells, which have vast potential for medical research and disease treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Arthur Hirsch
ahirsch6@jhu.edu
443-997-9909
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
JAMA Dermatology
Online advertising can deliver targeted cancer prevention messages, UCSF study finds
Online advertising based on Google search terms is a potentially effective way to deliver targeted cancer prevention education, according to a study led by Eleni Linos, M.D., Dr.P.H., an assistant professor of dermatology at UCSF.

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
The perfect match might be the imperfect one
When it comes to treating blood cancers like leukemia and lymphomas, new research shows that a half-matched donor bone marrow transplant may be just as good as a full match, in the first apples to apples type comparison of its kind.

Contact: Edyta Zielinska
edyta.zielinska@jefferson.edu
215-955-5291
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
JAMA Dermatology
Advanced device improves health and saves costs for patients with lymphedema
Lymphedema patients saw a nearly 80 percent reduction in their cellulitis episodes just by using an advanced pneumatic compression device at home, according to a study in JAMA Dermatology co-authored by Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Professor Sheila Ridner, Ph.D., MSHSA, FAAN, and University of Minnesota School of Public Health Associate Professor Pinar Karaca-Mandic, Ph.D.

Contact: Kathy Rivers
kathy.rivers@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-3894
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
JAMA Dermatology
Using Google online advertising as a public health tool for cancer prevention
Online advertising may be a feasible way to deliver targeted prevention messages related to indoor tanning and skin cancer, according to an article published online by JAMA Dermatology.

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
Elizabeth.Fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-514-1592
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2015
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Researchers isolate novel urinary biomarkers that may indicate adrenal cancer
A global analysis of metabolites and small molecules in urine samples from patients with adrenal cancer has identified four biochemicals that, when measured together, can distinguish malignant from benign adrenal tumors, according to study results presented at the 2015 Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

Contact: Devin Rose
pressinquiry@facs.org
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
JAMA Dermatology
Indoor tanning and skin cancer among gay, bisexual men and women
Gay and bisexual men indoor tan more frequently and report higher rates of skin cancer than heterosexual men, according to an article published online by JAMA Dermatology.

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
Elizabeth.Fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-514-1592
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Nature Genetics
Singapore scientists uncover genetic landscape of distinct breast tumors
A team from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Academic Medical Centre, comprising scientists and clinicians from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore General Hospital and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, has uncovered the genetic landscape of a distinct breast tumor group called fibroepithelial tumors. Their study identified the culprit genes behind the formation and progression of these tumors, potentially improving the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer and enhancing clinical intervention for patients with such tumors.
Singapore National Medical Research Council, National Cancer Centre Singapore's NCC Research Fund, Lee Foundation, Tanoto Foundation, Verdant Foundation Hong Kong

Contact: Lydia Ng
lydia.ng.w.r@singhealth.com.sg
656-377-8039
SingHealth

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
JAMA Dermatology
Gay, bisexual men report higher rates of indoor tanning, skin cancer than heterosexual men
Gay and bisexual men were up to six times more likely than heterosexual men to take part in indoor tanning, and twice as likely to report a history of skin cancer, according to a study led by UCSF researchers.

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Cell Reports
Two-hit therapy for breast tumors using approved drugs looks promising in animal study
Disabling a cancer-causing pathway and administering an immune-molecule-based mop-up therapy eradicated a specific type of breast tumor in mice.
Breast Cancer Research Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
IC3K 2015
Lancet Oncology
Expanding global access to radiotherapy
Queen's University researcher Timothy Hanna has co-authored a Lancet Oncology study that suggests as many as 90 per cent of people in low-income countries lack access to radiotherapy treatment.

Contact: Chris Armes
chris.armes@queensu.ca
613-533-6000 x77513
Queen's University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
BMC Medical Genomics
Groundbreaking computer program diagnoses cancer in two days
In by far the majority of cancer cases, the doctor can quickly identify the source of the disease, for example cancer of the liver, lungs, etc. However, in about one in 20 cases, the doctor can confirm that the patient has cancer -- but cannot find the source. These patients then face the prospect of a long wait with numerous diagnostic tests and attempts to locate the origin of the cancer before starting any treatment.

Contact: Aron Charles Eklund
eklund@cbs.dtu.dk
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Molecular Cancer Research
UT Southwestern researchers develop classification model for cancers caused by most frequently mutated gene in cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have developed a classification for cancers caused by KRAS, the most frequently mutated gene in cancer, that could eventually help oncologists choose more effective, customized cancer therapies.

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
'Chromosomal Chaos:' Complex array of mutations found in rare, aggressive leukemia
Sezary syndrome, an aggressive leukemia of mature T cells, is more complicated at a molecular level than ever suspected. With a poor prognosis and limited options for targeted therapies,this cancer needs new treatment approaches. The team's results uncover a previously unknown, complex genomic landscape, which can be used to design new personalized drug regimens for SS patients based on their unique genetic makeup.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
EMBO Journal
CNIO researchers have discovered a new player in tumor suppression and aging
The study reveals the protective role played by a little-known protein complex, SMC 5/6, in cancer and aging; the results emphasize, once more, the relationship between these two pathological processes. The research was published this week in the digital edition of the magazine 'EMBO Journal.'

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Medical diagnosis: Will brain palpation soon be possible?
By drawing on seismology, Inserm researchers led by Stéfan Catheline have just developed a noninvasive brain imaging method using MRI that provides the same information as physical palpation.

Contact: Stéfan Catheline
stefan.catheline@inserm.fr
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Experts recommend assessing individual benefits, risks of menopausal therapies
The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline on identifying women who are candidates for treatment of menopausal symptoms and selecting the best treatment options for each individual.
Endocrine Society

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Binghamton University professor fights cancer with hedgehogs
A Binghamton University biochemist has discovered a new way to fight cancer, one that attacks only the cancer cells and promises fewer side effects. He hunts hedgehogs. Hedgehogs are proteins that help govern how cells develop. Normally, once a person reaches maturation, the hedgehogs turn off. But in some cancers -- prostate, pancreatic, ovarian and lung in particular -- the hedgehogs somehow turn back on, and force uncontrolled cell growth: cancer.
Department of Defense

Contact: Brian Callahan
callahan@binghamton.edu
607-777-3089
Binghamton University

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies
From Molecular Case Studies: Genomics of exceptional responder to NOTCH inhibitor
Normal T-cell development requires Notch signaling but hyperactivity can lead to cancer. Drugs that inhibit Notch, such as gamma-secretase inhibitors, are currently being tested in different cancer types but clinical remission has yet to be reported. In a paper published today in Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies, researchers describe an acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient in which GSI treatment resulted in complete remission, suggesting that GSIs may hold therapeutic promise in ALL and other cancers.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Specialized Center of Research, William Lawrence and Blanche Hughes Foundation

Contact: Peggy Calicchia
calicchi@cshl.edu
516-422-4012
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Tolerant immune system increases cancer risk
If peripheral immune tolerance is very distinct, the risk for lung cancer doubles, the risk for colon cancer increases by 60 percent, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have now reported. They have shown for the first time that individual variations in immune tolerance have an impact on the development of specific types of cancer - long before the actual onset of the disease.

Contact: Sibylle Kohlstaedt
s.kohlstaedt@dkfz.de
German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Research calls for stricter screening recommendations for family history of colon cancer
All relatives of individuals with colorectal cancer are at increased risk for this cancer, regardless of the age of diagnosis of the index patient in the family, according to a study published online in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.

Contact: Rachel Steigerwald
media@gastro.org
301-272-1603
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Neuro-Oncology
Virus-drug combination shows improved effectiveness against brain tumor cells
A rabbit virus currently being developed for cancer therapy can be paired with one of several existing drugs to deliver a more potent punch to a deadly type of brain tumor cell, researchers have found.
V Foundation for Cancer Research, Terry Fox Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Doug Bennett
dougbennett@ufl.edu
352-273-5706
University of Florida

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Journal of Biomedical Optics
New microscopy technology augments surgeon's view for greater accuracy
Researchers at the University of Arizona in Tucson have developed a prototype of a new microscope technology that could help surgeons work with a greater degree of accuracy in diagnosing cancer or performing brain surgery or other procedures. The new technology, call augmented microscopy, is reported today in the Journal of Biomedical Optics, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Studies suggest new ways to inhibit oncogenes, enhance tumor-suppressor activity
Two studies by cancer scientists at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute suggest new approaches for treating cancer by inhibiting overactive cancer-promoting genes and by enhancing the activity of sluggish tumor-suppressor genes. The findings were reported in the journals Nature Communications and Nature Genetics.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, US Department of Defense, V Foundation for Cancer Research, Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Health Communication
Chapman University researches way to mathematically make something go viral on Facebook
Researchers at Chapman University have proposed a strategic approach for information spreading via Facebook using cancer screenings as a health intervention. They use Facebook to identify social clusters and opinion leaders and mathematically determine the best way to spread information, using health information as the subject.
Chapman University

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1302.

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