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Showing releases 901-925 out of 1365.

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Public Release: 4-Mar-2016
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Dietary glycemic index linked to lung cancer risk in select populations
Consuming a diet with a high glycemic index, a classification of how rapidly carbohydrates elevate blood sugar levels, was independently associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in non-Hispanic whites, according to a new epidemiologic study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Clayton R. Boldt, Ph.D.
crboldt@mdanderson.org
713-792-9518
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 4-Mar-2016
Scientific Reports
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers target specific protein associated with poor survival and treatment
Glioblastoma multiformeis a highly aggressive brain tumor with low survival rates, with newly diagnosed patients surviving a median of 14 months and recurrent patients surviving a median of only 3 to 9 months. New therapeutic targets and biomarkers for prognosis are urgently needed. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers recently reported that expression of the protein BIRC3 is associated with poor survival and recurrent disease in GBM patients; and therefore may be a good therapeutic target.

Contact: Lisa Chillura
lisa.chillura@moffitt.org
813-745-1353
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cell Reports
Blocking transfer of calcium to cell's powerhouse selectively kills cancer cells
Inhibiting the transfer of calcium ions into the cell's powerhouse is specifically toxic to cancer cells, suggesting new ways to fight the disease. Calcium addiction by mitochondria is a novel feature of cancer cells. This unexpected dependency on calcium transfer to the mitochondria for the survival of cancer cells surprised the researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
Tapping into Twitter to help recruit cancer patients into #ClinicalTrials
Twitter may be an effective, untapped resource to stimulate interest in cancer clinical trials and boost enrollment, physicians at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania suggest in a new research letter in JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
Long-term aspirin use linked to lower risk for gastrointestinal tract cancers
Regular low doses of aspirin for at least six years was associated with a modestly reduced overall risk for cancer, primarily due to a lower risk for gastrointestinal tract cancer, especially colorectal cancers, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
Regular aspirin use found to protect against overall cancer risk
An analysis of data from two major, long-term epidemiologic studies finds that the regular use of aspirin significantly reduces the overall risk of cancer, a reduction that primarily reflects a lower risk of colorectal cancer and other tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cell
Scientists reveal alternative route for cell death
Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered a new pathway for mitochondrial cell death that involves the protein BCL-2 ovarian killer otherwise known as BOK. The discovery, which is described online in the journal Cell, may lead to new ways to trigger cell death in some types of cancer cells.

Contact: Barry Whyte
barry.whyte@stjude.org
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cancer Cell
Breast cancer: An improved animal model opens up new treatments
EPFL scientists have developed an animal model for breast cancer that faithfully captures the disease. Tested on human breast tissue, this the most clinically realistic model of breast cancer to date.
European Union Seventh Framework Programme, European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations, Oncosuisse, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Science
There goes the neighborhood: Changes in chromosome structure activate cancer-causing genes
In a finding with enormous implications for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, Whitehead Institute scientists have discovered that breaches in looping chromosomal structures known as 'insulated neighborhoods' can activate oncogenes capable of fueling aggressive tumor growth.
National Institutes of Health, Erwin Schrödinger Fellowship from the Austrian Science Fund, Ludwig Graduate Fellowship funds, Laurie Kraus Lacob Faculty Scholar Award in Pediatric Translational Research, Hyundai Hope on Wheels

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cell Reports
Common genetic variant in a tumor suppressor gene linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes
P53, a tumor suppressor referred to as has often been described as the 'guardian of the genome,' may also be the 'guardian of obesity.' New research found that a variant of the gene is heavily implicated in metabolism, which may lead to obesity and the development of type 2 diabetes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ben Leach
bleach@wistar.org
215-495-6800
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Without ancestral gene life on Earth might not have evolved beyond slime
Researchers at the University of British Columbia have identified a common ancestral gene that enabled the evolution of advanced life over a billion years ago.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
How effective is Twitter to share cancer clinical trial information and recruit?
Could Twitter be a way to communicate with the public about cancer clinical trials and increase awareness and patient recruitment? A new research letter published online by JAMA Oncology considers that question.

Contact: Steve Graff
Stephen.Graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Science
Tumors contain the seeds of their own destruction
Scientists have made a groundbreaking discovery in understanding how the genetic complexity of tumors can be recognized and exploited by the immune system, even when the disease is at its most advanced stages.

Contact: Stephanie Mcclellan
stephanie.mcclellan@cancer.org.uk
020-346-95314
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Cell Reports
New vulnerability revealed in blood cancer development
Australian researchers have uncovered a protein that is key to the development of blood cancers caused by a common genetic error.
Victorian Government Operational Infrastructure Support Program, National Health and Medical Research Council, Leukaemia Foundation of Australia, Cancer Council Victoria, Lady Tata Memorial Trust, Estate of Anthony (Toni) Redstone OAM, and others

Contact: Vanessa S Solomon
solomon@wehi.edu.au
61-431-766-715
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Neuron
By cloning mouse neurons, TSRI scientists find brain cells with 100+ unique mutations
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute are the first to sequence the complete genomes of individual neurons and to produce live mice carrying neuronal genomes in all of their cells. Use of the technique revealed surprising insights into these cells' genomes.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Baxter Family Foundation, Norris Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
JAMA Oncology
Cancer expert says public health and prevention measures are key to defeating cancer
Is investment in research to develop new treatments the best approach to controlling cancer? Many people believe that the time is right for another big push to defeat cancer, including President Obama, who called for a major cancer-fighting campaign in his final State of the Union address. But in the latest paper, 'Targeting the Cancer Moonshot' in JAMA Oncology, this kind of effort will never cure cancer without public health and prevention.

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Plenaries at American Chemical Society meeting will focus on computers in chemistry
Scientists, in four plenary talks, will explore a variety of subjects related to the 'Computers in Chemistry' theme of the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place March 13-17 in San Diego.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Journal of Nutrition
Study shows broccoli may offer protection against liver cancer
Research has shown that eating broccoli three to five times per week can lower the risk of many types of cancers. Consuming a high-fat, high-sugar diet and having excess body fat is linked with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which can lead to diseases such as cirrhosis and liver cancer. A new study from the University of Illinois shows that including broccoli in the diet may protect against liver cancer, as well as aid in countering the development of NAFLD.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Stephanie Henry
slhenry@illinois.edu
217-244-1183
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Molecular Cell
PGK1 protein promotes brain tumor formation and cancer metabolism
PGK1, a glycolytic enzyme, has been found to play a role in coordinating cellular processes crucial to cancer metabolism and brain tumor formation, according to results published in today's online issue of Molecular Cell.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Current Biology
Healthy cells 'collaborate' with tumors to help build new blood vessels
Healthy cells actively collaborate with tumors by creating a mesh of collagen that encourages cancer cells to build new blood vessels, a new study shows. Researchers found that 'collaborator' cells build a beneficial environment around the tumor which helps it to build the new blood vessels it needs to grow.
Cancer Research UK, Breast Cancer Now

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Stem Cell Reports
MSU discovers a new kind of stem cell
Scientists at Michigan State University have discovered a new kind of stem cell, one that could lead to advances in regenerative medicine as well as offer new ways to study birth defects and other reproductive problems.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
ACS Central Science
Toward diagnosing diseases such as cancer in their earliest stages
Detecting diseases such as cancer in their earliest stages can make a huge difference in patient treatment, but it is often difficult to do. Now scientists report in the journal ACS Central Science a new, simple method that could make early disease diagnosis much easier. In addition, their approach only requires a minute sample of patient blood and is 1,000 times more sensitive in detecting biomarkers for thyroid cancer than the current government-approved test.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
New report finds 'surprising gaps' in knowledge of ovarian cancers
Ovarian cancer should not be categorized as a single disease, but rather as a constellation of different cancers involving the ovary, yet questions remain on how and where various ovarian cancers arise, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Contact: Jennifer Walsh
news@nas.edu
202-334-2138
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Next-generation immunotherapy offers new hope for beating brain cancer
High-grade glioma is the most aggressive form of brain cancer. Despite improvements in surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, this type of brain tumor is still notoriously hard to treat: less than 10 percent of patients survive beyond five years. Researchers from KU Leuven, Belgium, have now shown that next-generation cell-based immunotherapy may offer new hope in the fight against brain cancer.

Contact: Patrizia Agostinis
Patrizia.Agostinis@med.kuleuven.be
KU Leuven

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Cancer Causes & Control
Processed meat may increase the risk of breast cancer for Latinas, USC study finds
Latinas who eat processed meats such as bacon and sausage may have an increased risk for breast cancer, according to a new study that did not find the same association among white women. Researchers also looked at consumption of red meats, poultry, all fish and just tuna. White women who ate an average of 14 grams of tuna daily (roughly the size of a thimble) were 25 percent more likely to have breast cancer than those who did not.
California Department of Public Health, National Institutes of Health, California Breast Cancer Research Program, American Cancer Society and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Zen Vuong
zvuong@usc.edu
213-300-1381
University of Southern California

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1365.

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