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Showing releases 926-950 out of 1202.

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Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nicotine & Tobacco Research
Identifying a better message strategy for dissuading smokers: Add the positive
Which is more likely to convince a smoker to quit? The words, 'Warning: cigarettes cause cancer' beneath the image of an open mouth with a cancerous lesion and rotten teeth, or the same image with the words, 'Warning: Quitting smoking reduces the risk of cancer'? The answer depends on how confident you are in your ability to quit.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cancer and the immune system: A double-edged sword
During cancer development, tumor cells decorate their surfaces with sugar compounds called glycans that are different from those found on normal, healthy cells. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that sialic acids at the tips of these cancer cell glycans are capable of engaging with immune system cells and changing the latter's response to the tumor -- for good and bad.
Swiss National Science Foundation, Samuel and Ruth Engelberg Cancer Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
New knowledge of genes driving bladder cancer points to targeted treatments
A collaborative study between researchers at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute published today in the journal Clinical Cancer Research identifies BAP1 mutations in bladder cancer and also, independently, TERT mutations, implying two 'causes' of two distinct types of bladder cancer.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute-Intramural Support Program

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
UK study identifies molecule that induces cancer-killing protein
A new study by University of Kentucky researchers has identified a novel molecule named Arylquin 1 as a potent inducer of Par-4 secretion from normal cells. Par-4 is a protein that acts as a tumor suppressor, killing cancer cells while leaving normal cells unharmed.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
IU study: Combining epilepsy drug, morphine can result in less pain, lower opioid doses
Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control with fewer side effects. Moreover, the combination can reduce the dosage of the opioid needed to be effective, according to a team of pain researchers at Indiana University.
National Institutes of Health, Indiana Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Fund

Contact: Eric Schoch
eschoch@iu.edu
316-274-8205
Indiana University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Study adds to cancer-fighting promise of combined immunotherapy-radiation treatment
A study in mice implanted with breast and melanoma cancers adds to a growing body of evidence that highly focused radiation -- long thought to suppress immunity -- can actually help boost the immune system's fight against cancer when combined with a new kind of immune-enhancing drug.
American Association of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
T-bet tackles hepatitis
A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous hepatitis virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to researchers in Germany.
German Federal Ministry of Research, European Research Council

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Gastroenterology
AGA releases new tool to help GIs evaluate and treat Crohn's disease
The treatment of Crohn's disease is evolving. To help gastroenterologists better identify and manage their Crohn's disease patients, the American Gastroenterological Association has created a clinical decision tool to guide gastroenterologists in their decision-making process, which is published in Gastroenterology.

Contact: Aimee Frank
media@gastro.org
301-941-2620
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
Researchers develop improved means of detecting mismatched DNA
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified a highly sensitive means of analyzing very tiny amounts of DNA. The discovery, they say, could increase the ability of forensic scientists to match genetic material in some criminal investigations. It could also prevent the need for a painful, invasive test given to transplant patients at risk of rejecting their donor organs and replace it with a blood test that reveals traces of donor DNA.
Sol Goldman Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Pathology
Predicting prostate cancer: Pitt-developed test identifies new methods for treatment
A genetic discovery out of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is leading to a highly accurate test for aggressive prostate cancer and identifies new avenues for treatment.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Scientists identify the master regulator of cells' heat shock response
Heat shock proteins protect the molecules in all human and animal cells with factors that regulate their production and work as thermostats. Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere report for the first time that a protein called translation elongation factor eEF1A1 orchestrates the entire process of the heart shock response.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
World Congress on Cancers of the Skin
Skin cancer risks higher for soldiers serving abroad
Soldiers deployed to tropical and sunny climates are coming home with increased risk factors for a threat far from the battlefield: skin cancer.

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
International study identifies new genetic variants indicating risk for prostate cancer
An international data study co-led by Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California scientists and researchers in the United Kingdom has revealed 23 new genetic susceptibility locations indicating risk for prostate cancer.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Genes & Development
UNC researchers find final pieces to the circadian clock puzzle
UNC researchers discovered how two genes -- Period and Cryptochrome -- keep the circadian clocks in cells in proper rhythm with the 24-hour day. The finding has implications for drug development for various diseases including cancer and conditions such as jetlag and season affective disorder.
National Institutes of Health, Science Research Council, Academia Sinica in Taiwan

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature
Nature: New drug blocks gene driving cancer growth
When active, the protein called Ral can drive tumor growth and metastasis in several human cancers including pancreatic, prostate, lung, colon and bladder. Unfortunately, drugs that block its activity are not available. A study published today in the journal Nature uses a novel approach to target the activation of these Ral proteins.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Blood test for VEGF-A, TGF-B1 could help determine treatment options for esophageal cancer patients
A blood test may be beneficial in indicating neoadjuvant treatment regimens for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Genetics
Genetic testing can identify men at 6-fold increased risk of prostate cancer
Scientists can now explain one-hird of the inherited risk of prostate cancer, after a major international study identified 23 new genetic variants associated with increased risk of the disease.
Cancer Research UK, Prostate Cancer UK, European Union, National Institutes for Health

Contact: Graham Shaw
graham.shaw@icr.ac.uk
44-207-153-5380
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Advanced esophageal cancer patients who receive RT alone experience less problems when swallowing
Radiation therapy alone is as effective in decreasing swallowing complications experienced by advanced esophageal cancer patients as RT combined with chemotherapy, thus allowing patients to forgo chemotherapy, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Shorter course of ADT for high-risk prostate cancer patients yields improved quality of life
High-risk prostate cancer patients who receive radiation therapy and an 18-month course of androgen deprivation therapy recover a normal testosterone level in a shorter amount of time compared to those who receive a 36-month course of ADT, thus resulting in a better quality of life and without detriment to long-term outcomes, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Patient-reported data shows RT does not increase risk of lymphedema in node-negative BC patients
A secondary analysis of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-32 trial indicates that radiation therapy does not increase the incidence of lymphedema in patients with node-negative breast cancer, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Improved survival shown in early-stage Hodgkin's Disease patients who receive radiation therapy
Patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease who receive consolidated radiation therapy have a higher 10-year survival rate of 84 percent, compared to 76 percent for patients who did not receive RT; and, the data also shows a decrease in utilization of RT, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Manuka honey does not decrease pain of radiation-induced esophagitis for lung cancer patients
Patient-reported data indicates that when Manuka honey is prescribed for esophagitis pain during radiation therapy, it is not more effective than standard medical care, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
The shadow of a disease
A biosensor for the scattered light of individual unmarked biomolecules such as proteins and tumor markers may facilitate medical diagnosis. The biodetector, that a team led by V. Sandoghdar has developed at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, uses the interferometric method iSCAT.

Contact: Vahid Sandoghdar
vahid.sandoghdar@mpl.mpg.de
49-091-316-877-200
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Re-expression of an embryonic signaling pathway in Melanoma utilizes different receptors
Re-expression of an embryonic signaling pathway in melanoma utilizes different receptors than normal embryonic stem cells providing new insights for therapeutic intervention.

Contact: Peggy Murphy
pemurphy@luriechildrens.org
773-755-7485
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Cell
Researchers make scientific history with new cellular connection
Researchers led by Dr. Helen McNeill at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute have revealed an exciting and unusual biochemical connection. Their discovery has implications for diseases linked to mitochondria, which are the primary sources of energy production within our cells.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Sandeep Dhaliwal
dhaliwal@lunenfeld.ca
416-586-4800 x2046
Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1202.

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