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Showing releases 926-950 out of 1224.

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Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Gene 'driver' of Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia in up to one-third of patients identified
In nearly one-third of patients with Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia, a specific genetic mutation switches on the disease, and a new drug that blocks the defective gene can arrest the disease in animal models, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and allied institutions will report at the 2013 annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology. The finding may open the way to clinical trials of the drug in Waldenstrom's patients whose tumor cells carry the mutation.
The International Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia, the Kirsch lab and the Heje Fellowship Foundation

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
NLST data highlight probability of lung cancer overdiagnosis with low-dose CT screening
Data from the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial--conducted by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network and National Cancer Institute Lung Screening Study--provided researchers the opportunity to investigate the probability that cancer detected with screening low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) would not have progressed to become life threatening. The results published online in JAMA Internal Medicine suggest that up to 18 percent of the cancers detected by LDCT may not have progressed to affect patient health if left undetected.

Contact: Shawn Farley
PR@acr.org
703-648-8936
American College of Radiology

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Breast cancer prognosis associated with oncometabolite accumulation
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation Stefan Ambs and colleagues at the National Cancer Institute discovered an association between the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate levels, DNA methylation patterns, and breast cancer prognosis.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, CCR

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Dec. 9, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, December 9, 2013 in the JCI:Breast cancer prognosis associated with oncometabolite accumulation, Choloroquine reduces formation of bone resorbing cells in murine osteoporosis, Increased sugar uptake promotes oncogenesis via EPAC/RAP1 and O-GlcNAc pathways, Hematopoietic stem cells are acutely sensitive to Acd shelterin gene inactivation, Embryonic exposure to excess thyroid hormone causes thyrotrope cell death, and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Nature Methods
Measuring life's tugs and nudges
Scientists at Harvard University have devised the first method to measure the forces cells exert on each other in living three-dimensional tissues, including developing embryos. The method, developed at the Wyss Institute for Biological Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, could lead to new insights into how body shape develops as well as new tools to diagnose cancer, hypertension, connective tissue diseases, and more.

Contact: Dan Ferber
617-432-1547
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Study suggests overdiagnosis in screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT
More than 18 percent of all lung cancers detected by low-dose computed tomography appeared to represent an overdiagnosis, according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Mayo Clinic: Drug induces morphologic, molecular and clinical remissions in myelofibrosis
Imetelstat, a novel telomerase inhibiting drug, has been found to induce morphologic, molecular and clinical remissions in some patients with myelofibrosis a Mayo Clinic study has found. The results were presented today at the 2013 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in New Orleans.
Geron Corporation

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Breakthrough in treating leukemia, lymphoma with umbilical cord blood stem cells
Donated umbilical cord blood contains stem cells that can save the lives of patients with leukemia, lymphoma and other blood cancers. Now a study lead by a Loyola University Medical Center oncologist has found that growing cord blood stem cells in a laboratory before transplanting them into patients significantly improves survival.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Keep on exercising, researchers advise older breast cancer survivors
To build and maintain muscle strength, it is best for older breast cancer survivors to follow an ongoing exercise program of resistance and impact training. This summarizes the findings of a team of researchers who published their study in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship. They found out that the bone benefit from one year of such training could be maintained, even with less exercise, up to a year later.

Contact: Renate Bayaz
renate.bayaz@springer.com
49-622-148-78531
Springer

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Clinical Cancer Research
Ovarian cancer discovery deepens knowledge of survival outcomes
Researchers in the Women's Cancer Program at Cedars-Sinai's Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute have identified a series of 10 genes that may signify a trifecta of benefits for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer and ultimately reflect improved survival outcomes. The research found that the 10-gene biomarker panel may identify the aggressiveness of a patient's disease, help predict survival outcomes and result in novel therapeutic strategies tailored to patients with the most adverse survival outcomes.
American Cancer Society, Sandy Rollman Ovarian Cancer Foundation, Pacific Ovarian Cancer Research Consortium

Contact: Cara Martinez
cara.martinez@cshs.org
310-423-7798
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Neurology
REiNS collaboration seeks common outcome measures for neurofibromatosis clinical trials
As potentially effective new treatments for neurofibromatosis (NF) are developed, standardized research approaches -- including outcome measures specific to NF -- are needed. The first report from the Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis (REiNS) International Collaboration has been published as a supplement to Neurology®, the Official Journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Cancer
Inflammation in prostate may reduce cancer risk
Doctors at the North Shore-LIJ Health System have discovered that increased inflammation in the prostate may predict reduced risk for prostate cancer. The findings are published online in CANCER.

Contact: Emily Ng
eng3@nshs.edu
516-562-2670
North Shore-Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Health System

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Economic factors may affect getting guideline-recommended breast cancer treatment
Women with interruptions in health insurance coverage or with low income levels had a significantly increased likelihood of failing to receive breast cancer care that is in concordance with recommended treatment guidelines, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Potential biological factor contributing to racial disparities in prostate cancer
Researchers have uncovered a potential biological factor that may contribute to disparities in prostate cancer incidence and mortality between African-American and non-Hispanic white men in the United States, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Biomarker linked to aggressive breast cancers, poor outcomes in African-Americans
Among African-American women with breast cancer, increased levels of the protein HSET were associated with worse breast cancer outcomes, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Nature Methods
Novel method could help bring cancer biomarkers to clinic
International study demonstrates protein-measurement technique's potential to standardize quantification of the entire human proteome.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Deborah Bach
media@fredhutch.org
206-667-2210
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Diabetes identified as risk factor for liver cancer across ethnic groups
Diabetes was associated with an increased risk for developing a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma, and this association was highest for Latinos, followed by Hawaiians, African-Americans, and Japanese-Americans, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Nature
From common colds to deadly lung diseases, 1 protein plays key role
An international team of researchers has zeroed in on a protein that plays a key role in many lung-related ailments, from seasonal coughing and hacking to more serious diseases such as MRSA infections and cystic fibrosis. The finding advances knowledge about this range of illnesses and may point the way to eventually being able to prevent infections such as MRSA. The key protein is called MUC5B.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dan Meyers
dan.meyers@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Nature Genetics
Gene promotes 1 in 100 of tumors
Scientists propose that a gene that is mutated in one per cent of cancer patients could offer a new avenue to personalised cancer therapy. The team used data from thousands of cancer patients to find that the CUX1 gene is mutated at a low frequency over a wide range of cancer types. Drugs that could be effective against this cancer causing mutation are currently available.

Contact: Aileen Sheehy
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-92368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Nature Neuroscience
Boosting the immune system to treat brain cancer
Researchers at the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute have made a discovery that could lead to better treatment for patients suffering from brain cancer. Researchers looked at human brain tumor samples and discovered that specialized immune cells in brain tumor patients are compromised. The researchers took this discovery and, in an animal model, identified a drug that is able to re-activate those immune cells and reduce brain tumor growth, thereby increasing the lifespan of mice two to three times.
Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions/Alberta Cancer Foundation

Contact: Marta
mcyperli@ucalgary.ca
403-210-3835
University of Calgary

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Novel drug regimen can improve stem cell transplantation outcomes
Adding bortezomib (Velcade) to standard preventive therapy for graft-versus-host-disease results in improved outcomes for patients receiving stem-cell transplants from mismatched and unrelated donors, according to researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
Millennium & Ostsuka Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Targeted treatment can significantly reduce relapse in children with AML leukemia
A new study finds targeted treatment can significantly reduce relapse risk in high-risk children with acute myeloid leukemia.

Contact: Jake Jacobson
jajacobson@cmh.edu
816-701-4097
Children's Mercy Hospital

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
T cell immunotherapy: Promising results in children and adults with leukemia
Nearly 90 percent of children and adults with a highly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed no evidence of cancer after receiving a novel, personalized cell therapy that reprograms a patient's immune system. In pilot studies of bioengineered T cells that attack leukemia, 24 of 27 patients experienced complete responses within 28 days after treatment.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society; Novartis, W.W. Smith Charitable Trust, and others

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman
Salis@email.chop.edu
267-970-3685
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Penn Medicine team reports on study of first 59 leukemia patients who received cell therapy
Three and a half years after beginning a clinical trial which demonstrated the first successful and sustained use of genetically engineered T cells to fight leukemia, a research team from the University of Pennsylvania will announce the latest data on 59 adults and children with advanced blood cancers that have failed to respond to standard therapies. Results in patients who received this investigational, personalized cellular therapy, known as CTL019, will be presented during the American Society of Hematology's Annual Meeting and Exposition.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy, Novartis

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Age shouldn't limit access to transplants for MDS, study suggests
Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes who were as old as 74 fared as well with stem cell transplantation as did patients in the 60-to-65 age range, according to a study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Showing releases 926-950 out of 1224.

<< < 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 > >>

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