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Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Economic factors may affect getting guideline-recommended breast cancer treatment
Women with interruptions in health insurance coverage or with low income levels had a significantly increased likelihood of failing to receive breast cancer care that is in concordance with recommended treatment guidelines, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Diabetes identified as risk factor for liver cancer across ethnic groups
Diabetes was associated with an increased risk for developing a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma, and this association was highest for Latinos, followed by Hawaiians, African-Americans, and Japanese-Americans, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Biomarker linked to aggressive breast cancers, poor outcomes in African-Americans
Among African-American women with breast cancer, increased levels of the protein HSET were associated with worse breast cancer outcomes, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Potential biological factor contributing to racial disparities in prostate cancer
Researchers have uncovered a potential biological factor that may contribute to disparities in prostate cancer incidence and mortality between African-American and non-Hispanic white men in the United States, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7155
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Genetic mutations and molecular alterations may explain racial differences in head and neck cancers
A team of scientists at Johns Hopkins and in Texas has identified a handful of genetic mutations in black Americans, in addition to some chemical alterations affecting gene activity, which may help explain why the death rate among African-Americans from the most common form of head and neck cancer continues to hover some 18 percent higher above the death rate of whites with the same cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: David March
dmarch1@jhmi.edu
410-955-1534
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities
Survey: Knowledge about HPV vaccine effectiveness lacking
Knowledge about the efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in preventing cervical cancer was lacking in the majority of survey respondents for whom the information would be relevant, according to results presented here at the Sixth AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held Dec. 6-9.

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Blood
High-tech gene-therapy advances offer hope for patients with hard-to-treat blood disorders
A series of advancements in genetically engineered cell therapies demonstrate early efficacy and safety in patients with blood disorders for whom standard treatments have been unsuccessful, according to data showcased today during the 55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans.

Contact: Kassidie Blackstock
Kassidie.Blackstock@fleishman.com
865-776-6827
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
T cell immunotherapy: Promising results in children and adults with leukemia
Nearly 90 percent of children and adults with a highly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed no evidence of cancer after receiving a novel, personalized cell therapy that reprograms a patient's immune system. In pilot studies of bioengineered T cells that attack leukemia, 24 of 27 patients experienced complete responses within 28 days after treatment.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society; Novartis, W.W. Smith Charitable Trust, and others

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman
Salis@email.chop.edu
267-970-3685
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Penn Medicine team reports on study of first 59 leukemia patients who received cell therapy
Three and a half years after beginning a clinical trial which demonstrated the first successful and sustained use of genetically engineered T cells to fight leukemia, a research team from the University of Pennsylvania will announce the latest data on 59 adults and children with advanced blood cancers that have failed to respond to standard therapies. Results in patients who received this investigational, personalized cellular therapy, known as CTL019, will be presented during the American Society of Hematology's Annual Meeting and Exposition.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy, Novartis

Contact: Holly Auer
holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu
215-200-2313
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Blood
Advances in stem cell transplantation strategies show promise to improve availability, success
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, once considered an effective yet risky alternative to drug therapy for blood cancer, has become more accessible and successful in a wide range of patients as a result of major advances in transplant strategies and technologies. Several studies representing these advances were presented today during the 55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans.

Contact: Kassidie Blackstock
Kassidie.Blackstock@fleishman.com
865-776-6827
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 7-Dec-2013
55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Age shouldn't limit access to transplants for MDS, study suggests
Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes who were as old as 74 fared as well with stem cell transplantation as did patients in the 60-to-65 age range, according to a study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Journal of National Cancer Institute
Gut microbes may be a risk factor for colorectal cancer
In one of the largest epidemiological studies of human gut bacteria and colorectal cancer ever conducted, a team of researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center has found a clear association between gut bacteria and colorectal cancer. The study, published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, discovered that colorectal cancer patients had fewer beneficial bacteria and more harmful bacteria than people without the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Decreased diversity of bacteria microbiome in the gut is associated with risk of colorectal cancer
Decreased diversity in the microbial community found in the human gut is associated with colorectal cancer, according to a new study published December 6 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Molecular Cell
Cancer-promoting protein is vital to safe division of tumor cells
Researchers have caught a protein they previously implicated in a variety of cancer-promoting roles performing a vital function in cell division, survival and development of brain tumors.

Contact: Scott Merville
SMerville@mdanderson.org
713-792-0661
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Cigarette smoking after cancer diagnosis increases risk of death
Men who continued to smoke after a cancer diagnosis had an increased risk of death compared with those who quit smoking after diagnosis, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
US Public Health Service Grants

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Clinical waste may prove valuable for monitoring treatment response in ovarian cancer
A microchip-based device developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may greatly simplify the monitoring of patients' response to treatment for ovarian cancer -- the most lethal form of gynecologic cancer -- and certain other malignancies. The team reports using their device to isolate and identify tumor cells from ascites, an accumulation of fluid in the abdomen that often occurs in abdominal cancers.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense

Contact: Cassandra Aviles
cmaviles@partners.org
617-724-6433
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Science
Cancer mutation likely trigger of scleroderma
Johns Hopkins scientists have found evidence that cancer triggers the autoimmune disease scleroderma, which causes thickening and hardening of the skin and widespread organ damage.

Contact: David March
dmarch1@jhmi.edu
410-955-1534
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Cancer Prevention Research
Computer model suggests genetic breast cancer screening may benefit those at intermediate risk
Archimedes Inc., a healthcare modeling and analytics company, today announced results of a simulated clinical trial which found that the seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (7SNP) genetic test for breast cancer was most cost effective when used to guide MRI screenings for patients found to have an intermediate lifetime risk of developing the disease. The study, "Cost-effectiveness of a genetic test for breast cancer risk," appeared in the Dec. 5 online issue of the peer-reviewed journal Cancer Prevention Research.

Contact: Kerry Sinclair
kerry.sinclair@gcihealth.com
310-710-0321
GCI Health

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
PLOS Genetics
Coffee or beer? The choice could affect your genome
Coffee and beer are polar opposites in the beverage world -- coffee picks you up, and beer winds you down. Now Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered that the beverages may also have opposite effects on your genome. Working with a kind of yeast that shares many important genetic similarities with humans, the researchers found that caffeine shortens and alcohol lengthens telomeres -- the end points of chromosomal DNA, implicated in aging and cancer.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Science
Brain cancer cells hide while drugs seek
A team of scientists, led by principal investigator Paul S. Mischel, M.D., a member of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has found that brain cancer cells resist therapy by dialing down the gene mutation targeted by drugs, then re-amplify that growth-promoting mutation after therapy has stopped.
The Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation Fund, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Epigenetics
Researchers identify fundamental differences between human cancers and genetically engineered mouse models of cancer
Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, WA have taken a closer look at existing mouse models of cancer, specifically comparing them to human cancer samples. These genetically engineered mouse models (which usually either overexpress a cancer-causing gene--or "oncogene"--or carry a deletion for a "tumor suppressor" gene) have been extensively used to understand human cancer biology in studies of drug resistance, early detection, metastasis, and cancer prevention, as well as for the preclinical development of novel targeted therapeutics.

Contact: Andrew Thompson
andrew@landesbioscience.com
Landes Bioscience

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Group of anti-diabetic drugs can significantly lower cancer risk in women with type 2 diabetes
A Cleveland Clinic-led study shows that a specific type of diabetes drug can decrease the risk of cancer in female patients with type 2 diabetes by up to 32 percent.

Contact: Caroline Auger
augerc@ccf.org
216-636-5874
Cleveland Clinic

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Cancer Research
Prostate cancer biomarker may predict patient outcomes
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of Alberta in Canada have identified a biomarker for a cellular switch that accurately predicts which prostate cancer patients are likely to have their cancer recur or spread.
National Institutes of Health, Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute

Contact: Dagny Stuart
dagny.stuart@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Journal of Hospital Medicine
CARING Criteria shows 1 year death risk at time of hospital admission
A new tool allows doctors to recognize patients at highest mortality risk, matching treatments to values and health goals.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Clinical Cancer Research
UAlberta researchers uncover why combination drug treatment ineffective in cancer clinical trials
Medical researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered that combination drug therapy didn't work well in clinical trials for cancer patients because one drug was making the other drug ineffective.
Alberta Cancer Board, Alberta Cancer Foundation, Alberta Innovates -- Health Solutions

Contact: Raquel Maurier
rmaurier@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1231.

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