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Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
The 9th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9)
Lancet
Radiotherapy after mastectomy benefits women with breast cancer in 1-3 lymph nodes
Women whose breast cancer has spread to just a few lymph nodes under their arm are less likely to have their disease recur or to die from it if they have radiotherapy after mastectomy, according to new research to be presented at the European Breast Cancer Conference and published simultaneously in The Lancet.
Cancer Research UK, British Heart Foundation, UK Medical Research Council

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
American Chemical Society 247th National Meeting & Exposition
Catching the early spread of breast cancer
When cancer spreads, it becomes even more deadly. It moves with stealth and can go undetected for months or years. But a new technology that uses 'nano-flares' has the potential to catch these tumor cells early. Today, at the 247th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, scientists presented the latest advances in nano-flare technology as it applies to the detection of metastatic breast cancer cells.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
55th ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition
Chemo-free treatment a possibility for leukemia/lymphoma
Patients with terminal forms of leukemia and lymphoma who have run out of treatment options could soon benefit from a new drug, which not only puts an end to chemotherapy and has virtually no side effects but also improves a patient's life expectancy and quality of life.

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@plymouth.ac.uk
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
IU, Regenstrief study: New noninvasive colorectal cancer screening tool highly accurate
An Indiana University and Regenstrief Institute study of nearly 10,000 average-risk, asymptomatic men and women from 90 sites across the United States reports that a multi-target stool DNA test -- a new noninvasive colorectal cancer screening tool that has not yet been approved for sale by the FDA -- detects 92.3 percent of colon cancers, compared to only 73.8 percent of cancers detected by a fecal immunochemical test, the most commonly used noninvasive test today.
Exact Sciences Corp.

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
The 9th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9)
Where are we with breast cancer in 2013?
The global burden of breast cancer remains immense in 2013, with over 1.6 million new cases being diagnosed annually. This burden has been increasing at a rate of 3.1 percent per year, and while the majority of new cases are diagnosed among women in developed countries, the 450,000 deaths per year from the disease are now equally divided between the developing and developed world.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New, noninvasive, stool-based colorectal cancer screening test
A new, noninvasive, stool-based screening test detected 92 percent of colorectal cancer, according to a multicenter trial published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The new test, which is not yet approved by the FDA, allows patients to collect a sample at home without the need for bowel preparation or diet restrictions.
Exact Sciences Corporation

Contact: Johanna Younghans
johanna.younghans@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Noninvasive colorectal cancer screening tool shows unprecedented detection rates
Results of a clinical trial of Cologuard show unprecedented rates of precancer and cancer detection by a noninvasive test. The detection rates are similar to those reported for colonoscopy. The results were published in the March 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Cologuard was co-developed by Mayo Clinic and Exact Sciences.
Exact Sciences

Contact: Brian Kilen
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Molecular Systems Biology
101 liver cancer drug candidates pave the way to personalized medicine
The heart disease drug perhexiline is one of 101 compounds predicted to prevent cancer growth in most patients suffering from our most common liver cancer, HCC. This is an outcome from a novel simulation-based approach using personal sets of proteins of six HCC patients. 'This is the first time personalized models have been used to find and evaluate new potential drugs,' says professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology.
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation

Contact: Christian Borg
christian.borg@chalmers.se
46-317-723-395
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Moffitt researchers discover new mechanism allowing tumor cells to escape immune surve
The immune system plays a pivotal role in targeting cancer cells for destruction. However, tumor cells are smart and have developed ways to avoid immune detection. A collaborative team of researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center recently discovered a novel mechanism that lung cancer cells use to block detection by a type of immune cell called a natural killer cell.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Exposure to snuff smoke in non-smokers fell by 90 percent after the tobacco control laws
The study evaluated a biomarker of exposure to snuff smoke in non-smokers and also their perception before and after the entry into force of the two laws. The work done by the Tobacco Control Unit of the ICO-IDIBELL has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
34-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Radiology
Using big data to identify triple-negative breast, oropharyngeal, and lung cancers
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and colleagues used 'big data' analytics to accurately predict if a patient is suffering from aggressive or more treatable forms of breast cancer and a type of head and neck cancer. They are beginning a similar study on lung cancers. All efforts are to provide patients with earlier and more accurate detection, enabling them to choose the most suitable treatments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Nature Methods
Major breakthrough in developing new cancer drugs: Capturing leukemic stem cells
The Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer at the University of Montreal, in collaboration with the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital's Quebec Leukemia Cell Bank, recently achieved a significant breakthrough thanks to the laboratory growth of leukemic stem cells, which will speed up the development of new cancer drugs.

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-566-3813
University of Montreal

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
TGen-led study spotlights dog DNA role in developing new therapies for human cancers
Using genomic analysis to study cancer in dogs can help develop new therapies for humans with cancer, according to a proof-of-concept study led by the National Cancer Institute and the Translational Genomics Research Institute.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print table of contents for March 18, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, March 18, 2014 in the JCI: Cardiac conduction altered by intragenic enhancer, Inflammatory feedback loop promotes colorectal cancer metastasis, Insulin resistance in bone disrupts whole-body glucose homeostasis, Pathogenic interactions between platelets and neutrophils are mediated by AKT2, Sympathetic activity-associated periodic repolarization dynamics predict mortality following myocardial infarction, and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Early detection of childhood eye cancer doesn't always improve survival, prevent eye loss
For the most common form of childhood eye cancer, unilateral retinoblastoma, shortening the time from the first appearance of symptoms to diagnosis of disease has no bearing on survival or stage of the disease, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in partnership with the Hospital Infantil de Mexico. The results appear online in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Timothy S. Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Primary androgen deprivation therapy ineffective for most men with early prostate cancer
A study of more than 15,000 men with early stage prostate cancer finds that those who received androgen deprivation as their primary treatment instead of surgery or radiation did not live any longer than those who received no treatment.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Study: Colon cancer incidence rates decreasing steeply in older Americans
Colon cancer incidence rates have dropped 30 percent in the US in the last 10 years among adults 50 and older due to the widespread uptake of colonoscopy, with the largest decrease in people over age 65.
American Cancer Society

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacterial reporters that get the scoop
A new engineered strain of E. coli bacteria non-destructively detected and recorded an environmental signal in the mouse gut, and remembered what it 'saw.' The advance could lead to a radically new screening tool for human gut health.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Harvard's Wyss Institute

Contact: Kristen Kusek
kristen.kusek@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Study finds that fast-moving cells in the human immune system walk in a stepwise manner
A team of biologists and engineers at UC San Diego applied advanced mathematical tools to answer a basic question in cell biology about how cells move and discovered that the mechanism looks very similar to walking. Their discovery, published March 17 in the Journal of Cell Biology, is an important advance toward developing new pharmacological strategies to treat chronic inflammatory diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-General Subjects
New hope for early detection of stomach cancer
University of Adelaide research has provided new hope for the early detection of stomach cancer with the identification of four new biomarkers in the blood of human cancer patients.

Contact: Peter Hoffmann
Peter.Hoffmann@adelaide.edu.au
61-043-407-9108
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Health gap between adult survivors of childhood cancer and siblings widens with age
Adult survivors of childhood cancer face significant health problems as they age and are five times more likely than their siblings to develop new cancers, heart and other serious health conditions beyond the age of 35, according to the latest findings from the world's largest study of childhood cancer survivors.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
media@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Archaeologists discover the earliest complete example of a human with cancer
Archaeologists have found the oldest complete example in the world of a human with metastatic cancer in a 3,000-year-old skeleton.
Leverhulme Trust, Institute of Bioarchaeology Amara West Field School

Contact: Dionne Hamil
dionne.hamil@durham.ac.uk
01-913-346-078
Durham University

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
American Chemical Society 247th National Meeting & Exposition
Major 'third-hand smoke' compound causes DNA damage -- and potentially cancer
Leftover cigarette smoke that clings to walls and furniture is a smelly nuisance, but now research suggests that it could pose a far more serious threat, especially to young children who put toys and other smoke-affected items into their mouths. Scientists reported today at the 247th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society that one of the tobacco-specific nitrosamines newly formed in 'third-hand smoke' damages DNA and could potentially cause cancer.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature
How diabetes drugs may work against cancer
Scientists at Whitehead Institute have pinpointed a major mitochondrial pathway that imbues cancer cells with the ability to survive in low-glucose environments. By identifying cancer cells with defects in this pathway or with impaired glucose utilization, the scientists can predict which tumors will be sensitive to these anti-diabetic drugs known to inhibit this pathway.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Jane Coffin Childs Fund, Council of Higher Education Turkey, Karadeni

Contact: Nicole Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature Genetics
Cancer therapy may be too targeted
Targeted therapies seem to be the future of cancer treatment, but can they be too narrowly focused? In a study published in Nature Genetics, scientists have found that for a rare cancer of the blood vessel where several mutations can underlie the disease, many different parts of the pathway can be disrupted. For patients with multiple underlying mutations, previously developed therapies that focus on targeting a single component in the pathway will be ineffective.
Wellcome Trust

Contact: Mary Clarke
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-95328
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1278.

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