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Showing releases 951-975 out of 1240.

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Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Tumor chromosomal translocations reproduced for the first time in human cells
Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre and the Spanish National Cardiovascular Research Centre have been able to reproduce, for the first time in human cells, chromosomal translocations associated with two types of cancer: acute myeloid leukemia and Ewing's sarcoma. The discovery, published today in the journal Nature Communications, opens the door to the development of new therapeutic targets to fight these types of cancer.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Cancer
Screening has prevented half a million colorectal cancers
An estimated half a million cancers were prevented by colorectal cancer screening in the United States from 1976 to 2009, report researchers from the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale Cancer Center. Their study appears in the journal Cancer. During this more than 30-year time span, as increasing numbers of men and women underwent cancer screening tests -- including fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopies, and colonoscopies -- colorectal cancer rates declined significantly, the researchers found.
Medtronic, Johnson & Johnson, Natoinal Institutes of Health

Contact: Helen Dodson
helen.dodson@yale.edu
203-436-3984
Yale University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Myriad myPath melanoma test improves the reliability of melanoma diagnosis
Results from a pivotal clinical validation study of the Myriad myPath Melanoma test at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting show that it accurately differentiates malignant melanoma from benign skin lesions with a high level of accuracy and helps physicians deliver a more objective and confident diagnosis for patients. The Myriad myPath Melanoma test is a unique test of 23 genes that provides valuable, additive diagnostic information unavailable from any other method.

Contact: Ronald Rogers
rrogers@myriad.com
908-285-0248
Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Nature Biotechnology
DREAM project crowdsources answer to cancer cell drug sensitivities
A study published June 1 in the journal Nature Biotechnology describes the results of an open challenge to predict which breast cancer cell lines will respond to which drugs, based only on the sum of cells' genomic data. The winning entry, from the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, was 78 percent accurate in identifying sensitive versus resistant cell lines, and was one of 44 algorithms submitted by groups from around the world.
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Myriad presents clinical data on Myriad myRisk Hereditary Cancer Test at ASCO
Data being presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting show that the Myriad myRisk Hereditary Cancer test detects significantly more deleterious mutations than single cancer tests and helps solve the overlap dilemma that exists among hereditary cancer syndromes. The myRisk test uses next-generation sequencing technology to evaluate 25 clinically significant hereditary cancer genes associated with eight major hereditary cancers including: breast, colon, ovarian, endometrial, pancreatic, prostate, gastric cancers and melanoma.

Contact: Ronald Rogers
rrogers@myriad.com
908-285-0248
Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Study shows tale of 2 prognoses in pediatric brain tumor, pilocytic astrocytoma
Research presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 used a newly designed test for K:B fusion to show that point mutations lead to a more dangerous form of the disease than does K:B fusion.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
303-524-2780
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
News from Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet June 3, 2014
The June 3, 2014, issue of Annal of Internal Medicine contains the following papers: 'For some, screening for colorectal cancer should continue well past age 75,' 'Practices using patient-centered medical home with EHRs have improved quality of care,' and 'Observation: Tanning beds associated with vitamin D toxicity?'

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
New data shows ProMark accurately predicts aggressive prostate cancer, pathology outcomes
Metamark presents data showing test accurately predicts low/high risk prostate cancer.

Contact: Theresa Dolge
Theresa.Dolge@toniclc.com
215-928-2748
Tonic Life Communications USA

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Nature Genetics
BRCA2 gene now connected to lung cancer, doubling a smoker's risk
New research confirms a vulnerability to lung cancer can be inherited and implicates the BRCA2 gene as harboring one of the involved genetic mutations. An international consortium of scientists including investigators used integrated results from the 1000 Genomes Project with genetics studies of lung cancer to complete the investigation published on June 1, 2014, in Nature Genetics.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Expanded health coverage may improve cancer outcomes in young adults, study suggests
Young adults who lack health care insurance are more likely to be diagnosed in advanced stages of cancer and have a higher risk of death, according to a study from Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School.
Heritage Medical Research Institute

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5653
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Gene therapy combined with IMRT found to reduce recurrence for select prostate cancer patients
Combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy with intensity modulated radiation therapy reduces the risk of having a positive prostate biopsy two years after treatment in intermediate-risk prostate cancer without affecting patients' quality of life.

Contact: Brittany Ashcroft
press@astro.org
703-839-7336
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print table of contents for June 2, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, June 2, 2014 in the JCI: 'Mucin concentration contributes to a sticky situation in cystic fibrosis,' 'Engineered aptimer targets malignant and tumor-associated T cells,' 'NOTCH inhibits osteoblast formation in inflammatory arthritis via noncanonical NF-κB,' 'Myosin Vb uncoupling from RAB8A and RAB11A elicits microvillus inclusion disease,' 'Biliary repair and carcinogenesis are mediated by IL-33-dependent cholangiocyte proliferation,' and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
New therapies harness power of the immune system against cancer
New research on innovative immunotherapies for advanced or high-risk melanoma and cervical cancer were presented today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. These treatments -- used alone or in combination -- fight cancer by activating and amplifying the body's immune response to the disease.

Contact: Kate Blackburn
Kate.Blackburn@asco.org
312-949-3232
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Blood
One in 4 children with leukemia not taking maintenance medication, study shows
An estimated 25 percent of children in remission from acute lymphocytic leukemia are missing too many doses of an essential maintenance medication that minimizes their risk of relapse, according to a study published online in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology.

Contact: Amanda Szabo
aszabo@hematology.org
202-552-4914
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Genes & Development
Stopping the spread of breast cancer
Scientists have discovered a new pathway that can stop breast cancer cells from spreading. Working with human cancer cells and a mouse model of breast cancer, scientists identified a new protein that plays a key role in reprogramming cancer cells to migrate and invade other organs. When that protein is removed from cancer cells in mice, the ability of the cells to metastasize to the lung is dramatically decreased.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Study finds risk of recurrence low in smallest HER2+ breast cancer tumors
Patients with specific HER2+ breast cancer tumors had a low risk of the cancer recurring five years after diagnosis, even without chemotherapy or treatment with a common antibody, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Contact: Vincent Staupe
vstaupe@golinharris.com
415-318-4386
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Long-term results encouraging for combination immunotherapy for advanced melanoma
The first long-term follow-up results from a phase 1b immunotherapy trial combining drugs for advanced melanoma patients has shown encouraging results -- long-lasting with high survival rates -- researchers report. First author Mario Sznol, M.D., professor of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center, is presenting the updated data at the 2014 annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Ono Pharmaceutical Company

Contact: Vicky Agnew
vicky.agnew@yale.edu
843-697-6208
Yale University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Nutrition experts: Debate over value of vitamin, mineral supplements is far from over
Researchers have taken issue with recent claims that 'the case is closed' on whether or not a multivitamin/mineral supplement should be taken by most people to help obtain needed micronutrients.

Contact: Balz Frei
balz.frei@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5078
Oregon State University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
Nature Medicine
'Quadrapeutics' works in preclinical study of hard-to-treat tumors
A Rice University-led study in this week's Nature Medicine reports the first preclinical tests for a novel anti-cancer technology called 'quadrapeutics' that converts current clinical treatments to instantaneously detect and kill only cancer cells. Quadrapeutics combines clinically available drugs, colloidal gold, pulsed lasers and radiation in a novel and safe micro-treatment that improved standard therapy by 17-fold against aggressive, drug-resistant tumors.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Simmons Family Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Chemotherapy following radiation treatment improves progression-free survival
A chemotherapy regimen consisting of procarbazine, CCNU, and vincristine administered following radiation therapy improved progression-free survival and overall survival in adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain cancer, when compared to radiation therapy alone. The findings were part of the results of a Phase III clinical trial presented today at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting by the study's primary author Jan Buckner, M.D., deputy director, Cancer Practice, at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Joe Dangor
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
Nature
Paired enzyme action in yeast reveals backup system for DNA repair
The combined action of two enzymes, Srs2 and Exo1, prevents and repairs common genetic mutations in growing yeast cells, according to a new study led by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Prostate cancer drug delivers benefits before chemotherapy
A drug used to treat men with late-stage prostate cancer proved effective in stemming progression of the disease in research participants who had not yet received chemotherapy and extended their survival, according to results from a multi-national Phase III clinical trial led by the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University.
Medivation, Astellas Pharma

Contact: Elisa Williams
willieli@ohsu.edu
971-344-5441
Oregon Health & Science University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Major advances in breast, prostate, colorectal cancer featured at ASCO Annual Meeting
Findings from four phase III clinical trials in breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers were released today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The studies were presented in ASCO's Plenary session, which features the meeting's most important clinical cancer research with the greatest potential to impact patient care.

Contact: Wendy Stokes
wendy.stokes@asco.org
312-949-3232
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Drug combination extends survival by more than a year in metastatic prostate cancer
Men with newly diagnosed metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer lived more than a year longer when they received a chemotherapy drug as initial treatment instead of waiting to for the disease to become resistant to hormone-blockers, report scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
440-670-6563
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Mayo Clinic: Ovarian cancer subtypes may predict response to bevacizumab
Molecular sequencing could identify ovarian cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with bevacizumab (Avastin), a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. Results of the research were presented today at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting.
2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting

Contact: Joe Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1240.

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