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Showing releases 951-975 out of 1318.

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Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Common chemotherapy is not heart toxic in patients with BRCA1/2 mutations
Use of anthracycline-based chemotherapy, a common treatment for breast cancer, has negligible cardiac toxicity in women whose tumors have BRCA1/2 mutations -- despite preclinical evidence that such treatment can damage the heart.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
215-514-9751
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Data published on ANG4043, anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody for treatment of brain metastases
Data published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, entitled 'ANG4043, a Novel Brain-penetrant Peptide-mAb Conjugate, is Efficacious against HER2-positive Intracranial Tumors in Mice,' demonstrates that ANG4043, a peptide-monoclonal antibody conjugate, entered the brain at therapeutic concentrations, resulting in significantly prolonged survival in mice. The antibody is directed against HER2, which is the protein targeted by Herceptin. The data published shows that this technology to cross the blood brain barrier is applicable to biologics such as mAbs.
Angiochem

Contact: Kathryn Morris
kathryn@theyatesnetwork.com
914-204-6412
The Yates Network

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature
Genetic errors linked to aging underlie leukemia that develops after cancer treatment
New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis challenges the view that cancer treatment in itself is a direct cause of a fatal form of leukemia that can develop several years after a patient receives chemotherapy or radiation therapy.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Heat-shock protein enables tumor evolution and drug resistance in breast cancer
Long known for its ability to help organisms successfully adapt to environmentally stressful conditions, the highly conserved molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 also enables estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy.
National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Susan G. Komen Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cancer Cell
New agent causes small cell lung tumors to shrink in pre-clinical testing
Small cell lung cancer -- a disease for which no new drugs have been approved for many years -- has shown itself vulnerable to an agent that disables part of tumor cells' basic survival machinery, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reported.
The National Institutes of Health, The Thoracic Foundation, The Susan Spooner Foundation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Bridge grant, the Danish Cancer Society.

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Immunotherapy shows clinical benefit in relapsed transplant recipients
A multicenter phase 1 trial of the immune checkpoint blocker ipilimumab found clinical benefit in nearly half of blood cancer patients who had relapsed following allogeneic stem cell transplantation, according to investigators from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, who developed and lead the study.
The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program of the National Cancer Institute, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Blood Cancer Research Partnership

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Disorder in gene-control system is a defining characteristic of cancer, study finds
The genetic tumult within cancerous tumors is more than matched by the disorder in one of the mechanisms for switching cells' genes on and off, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard report in a new study. Their findings, published online today in the journal Cancer Cell, indicate that the disarray in the on-off mechanism -- known as methylation -- is one of the defining characteristics of cancer and helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Blavatnik Family Foundation, Stand Up to Cancer, Melton and Rosenbach Funds, American Cancer Society, National Science Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists pinpoint a new line of defence used by cancer cells
Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered a new line of defense used by cancer cells to evade cell death, according to research published in Nature Communications.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Stephanie McClellan
stephanie.mcclellan@cancer.org.uk
44-203-469-5314
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
News from Annals of Internal Medicine Dec. 8, 2014
This week's issue includes: 'Breast density notification laws substantially increase costs yet save few lives' and 'Institute of Medicine 'Dying in America' report sparks discussion and debate.'

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cancer
Most elderly women with early stage breast cancer receive a treatment that may not be as effective
A new analysis has found that while clinical trial data support omitting radiation treatments in elderly women with early stage breast cancer, nearly two-thirds of these women continue to receive it.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cancer
Older breast cancer patients still get radiation despite limited benefit
Women over the age of 70 who have certain early-stage breast cancers overwhelmingly receive radiation therapy despite published evidence that the treatment has limited benefit, researchers at Duke Medicine report.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Blood
Experimental gene therapy successful in certain lymphomas and leukemia
Study results of CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor therapy using the Sleeping Beauty non-viral transduction system to modify T cells has demonstrated further promise in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
American Society of Hematology 56th Annual Meeting
UH Case Medical Center experts present data at ASH Annual Meeting
In a poster, Jane Little, MD, from Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, and colleagues present promising findings related to a novel biochip aimed at improving outcomes for patients with sickle cell disease. The innovative biochip, which evaluates the biophysical properties of red blood cells in sickle cell patients, has the potential to become a standard test for monitoring the disease.
Doris Duke Foundation, Belcher-Weir Innovation grant from UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital

Contact: Alicia Reale
Alicia.Reale@UHhospitals.org
216-533-0685
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cancer Cell
Targeting microRNA may benefit some ovarian and breast cancer patients
A genetic misfire called the 3q26.2 amplicon can cause real havoc. In fact, it is among the most frequent chromosomal aberrations seen in many cancers, including ovarian and breast cancers.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Blood
PRM-151 therapy well tolerated in patients with advanced myelofibrosis
A study that investigated the potential of the compound PRM-151 for reducing progressive bone marrow fibrosis in patients with advanced myelofibrosis has shown initial positive results. Myelofibrosis is a life-threatening bone marrow cancer.
Promedior Inc., National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Hookah smoking increases risk of subsequent cigarette smoking among adolescents
A team of researchers at Dartmouth College and University of Pittsburgh found respondents who had smoked water pipe tobacco but not smoked cigarettes were at increased risk of cigarette smoking two years later as recently published online in JAMA Pediatrics.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Kirk Cassel
Kirk.A.Cassels@Hitchcock.org
603-653-6177
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Experience counts with radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, study shows
Radiation therapy for head and neck cancer is highly complex, and a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology with an accompanying editorial suggests that medical centers with more experience centers have better patient outcomes.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
darrell.ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Turning biological cells to stone improves cancer and stem cell research
A simple technique that creates near-perfect, robust models of human and animal cells is being used to study cancer and stem cells, and could be used to create complex durable structures without the use of machinery.
US Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Injectable 3-D vaccines could fight cancer and infectious diseases
Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences show a non-surgical injection of programmable biomaterial that spontaneously assembles in vivo into a 3-D structure could fight and even help prevent cancer and also infectious disease such as HIV.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Toughest breast cancer may have met its match
Triple-negative breast cancer is as bad as it sounds. The cells that form these tumors lack three proteins that would make the cancer respond to powerful, customized treatments. Instead, doctors are left with treating these patients with traditional chemotherapy drugs that only show long-term effectiveness in 20 percent of women with triple-negative breast cancer.
Department of Defense (Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Cindy Rosencrans Fund for Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Women Together Fighting Cancer Organization, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Cathy Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Genetics
Genes that cause pancreatic cancer identified by new tool
A new screening tool in mice can identify causes of cancer invisible to genetic sequencing. The technique, which works by introducing sections of DNA called piggyBac transposons into the mouse genome, has uncovered large sets of previously unknown pancreatic cancer genes. It is hoped that this study will boost research into a disease that is still poorly understood and for which five-year survival rates have stood at around 5 percent for four decades.
Wellcome Trust, Helmholtz Alliance Preclinical Comprehensive Cancer Center, German Cancer Consortium

Contact: Mary Clarke
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
01-223-492-368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Genetics
A yardstick to measure the malignancy of prostate cancer
A protein that influences the epigenetic characteristics of tumor cells is directly linked to the grade of malignancy of prostate cancer. This key discovery has been made by a team of scientists from the German Cancer Research Center, the University of Zurich, Hamburg-Eppendorf University Hospital, Heidelberg University, and other institutes. The detection of this biomarker may serve as an indicator of the likelihood that the disease may take an aggressive course, and may thus be helpful in choosing an appropriate treatment.

Contact: Christoph Plass
c.plass@dkfz.de
49-622-142-1300
University of Zurich

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Improving health through smarter cities: Debut of a major new global science collaboration
A new international program to promote health in cities through better urban design and policies debuts at an international meeting of world experts in health, environmental, behavioral and social sciences hosted by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, China Tuesday Dec. 9.

Contact: Terry Collins
tc@tca.tc
416-538-8712
United Nations University

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
CNIO team has visualized the DNA double-strand break process for the first time
Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, led by Guillermo Montoya, have developed a method for producing biological crystals that has allowed scientists to observe -- for the first time -- DNA double chain breaks. They have also developed a computer simulation that makes this process, which lasts in the order of millionths of a second, visible to the human eye. The study is published today by the journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Cell Death & Disease
Study offers future hope for tackling signs of aging
A new advance in biomedical research at the University of Leicester could have potential in the future to assist with tackling diseases and conditions associated with aging -- as well as in treating cancer.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Salvador Macip
sm460@le.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1318.

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