IMAGE: Lung squamous cell carcinoma

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1265.

<< < 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
2014 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting
Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR technology highlighted at the 2014 AACR Annual Meeting
Cancer researchers will showcase new applications of Droplet Digital PCR, including its ability to track mutant DNA in liquid biopsies, and a faster, more cost-effective version for quantifying genetic aberrations.

Contact: Ken Li
kli@chempetitive.com
312-532-4675
Chempetitive Group

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Disease-free survival estimates for ovarian cancer improve over time
The probability of staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients who already have been disease-free for a period of time, and time elapsed since remission should be taken into account when making follow-up care decisions, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The findings will be presented Wednesday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach
The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment, according to a multidisciplinary team led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The results recently were published in Cancer Research and will be expanded upon on Tuesday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.
Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Pennsylvania Deptartment of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Recurrent head and neck tumors have gene mutations that could be vulnerable to cancer drug
An examination of the genetic landscape of head and neck cancers indicates that while metastatic and primary tumor cells share similar mutations, recurrent disease is associated with gene alterations that could be exquisitely sensitive to an existing cancer drug. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and Yale University School of Medicine will share their findings during a mini-symposium Sunday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
New test developed to detect men at high risk of prostate cancer recurrence
A new genetic 'signature' to identify prostate cancer patients who are at high risk of their cancer recurring after surgery or radiotherapy has been developed by researchers in Canada, the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology in Vienna will hear on Saturday. The test should help doctors identity men who might benefit from additional treatments.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
In mice, obese dads produce heavier daughters with epigenetically altered breast tissue
Obese male mice and normal weight female mice produce female pups that are overweight at birth and in childhood, and have increased number of 'terminal end buds' in their breast tissue -- the site where breast cancer often develops in rodents. 'Researchers traditionally study the maternal link to weight and cancer risk. This unusual study demonstrates a potential paternal link as well,' says the study author.
American Cancer Society, Prevent Cancer Foundation

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Brachytherapy helps maintain erectile function in prostate cancer patients without compromising treatment outcomes
The use of permanent brachytherapy, a procedure where radioactive sources are placed inside the prostate, into or near to the tumor, preserves erectile function in approximately 50 percent of patients with prostate cancer. Brachytherapy used alone is as effective as other established therapies for localized low to intermediate risk prostate cancer.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Plant-derived anti-cancer compounds explained at national conference
Compounds derived from plant-based sources -- including garlic, broccoli and medicine plants -- confer protective effects against breast cancer, explain researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with the UPMC CancerCenter. In multiple presentations Sunday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014, UPCI scientists will update the cancer research community on their National Cancer Institute-funded findings, including new discoveries about the mechanisms by which the plant-derived compounds work.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Journal of National Cancer Institute
Major genetic study links liver disease gene to bladder cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (with related research being presented this weekend at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Conference 2014) details the discovery of a new genetic driver of bladder cancer: silencing of the gene AGL.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Nowhere to hide: Kids, once protected, now influenced by tobacco marketing
New study finds teenagers and young adults are exposed and influenced by direct mail and web coupons from tobacco manufacturers. This direct marketing exposure is translating to increased nicotine use.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Genetic testing beneficial in melanoma treatment
Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments so that patients with melanoma have the best chance of beating it, according to the results of a clinical trial by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The trial, funded by the National Institutes of Health, will be presented Monday at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.
National Institutes of Health, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Antioxidants can protect against omega 6 damage -- or promote it
Given omega 6 fatty acid's reputation for promoting cancer -- at least in animal studies -- researchers are examining the role that antioxidants play in blocking the harmful effects of this culprit, found in many cooking oils. After all, antioxidants are supposed to prevent DNA damage. But employing antioxidants could backfire, say researchers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Bacterial gut biome may guide colon cancer progression
At the 2014 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in San Diego, researchers from the Wistar Institute present findings that suggest that gut bacteria can change the microenvironment in a way that promotes the growth and spread of tumors. Their results suggest that bacterial virulence proteins may suppress DNA repair proteins within the epithelial cells that line the colon.

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@wistar.org
215-898-3943
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
International consortium discovers 2 genes that modulate risk of breast and ovarian cancer
The paper has been authored by 200 researchers from 55 research groups from around the world and describes two new genes that influence the risk of women developing breast and ovarian cancer when they are carriers of BCRA1 and BCRA2 mutations.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Screening reveals additional link between endometriosis and ovarian cancer
Some women with endometriosis, a chronic inflammatory disease, are predisposed to ovarian cancer, and a genetic screening might someday help reveal which women are most at risk, according to a University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) study, in partnership with Magee-Womens Research Institute (MWRI). Monday at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, UPCI and MWRI researchers will present the preliminary results of the first comprehensive immune gene profile exploring endometriosis and cancer.
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Combining cell replication blocker with common cancer drug kills resistant tumor cells
Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter, have found that an agent that inhibits mitochondrial division can overcome tumor cell resistance to a commonly used cancer drug, and that the combination of the two induces rapid and synergistic cell death. Separately, neither had an effect. These findings will be presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-559-2431
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Fighting cancer with lasers and nanoballoons that pop
Researchers are developing a better delivery method for cancer drugs by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons -- which are tiny modified liposomes that, upon being struck by a red laser, pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Cancer and the Goldilocks effect
Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found that too little or too much of an enzyme called SRPK1 promotes cancer by disrupting a regulatory event critical for many fundamental cellular processes, including proliferation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Study shows fertility drugs do not increase breast cancer risk
Women who took clomiphene citrate (brand name Clomid) or gonadotropins as a part of fertility treatment did not experience an increased risk for breast cancer over 30 years of follow-up, compared with women who were not treated with these medications, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
Nanoparticles cause cancer cells to self-destruct
Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumour cells to 'self-destruct' sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in Sweden.

Contact: Erik Renström
erik.renstrom@med.lu.se
46-403-91157
Lund University

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Dose-escalated hypofractionated IMRT, conventional IMRT for prostate cancer have like side effects
Dose-escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy with use of a moderate hypofractionation regimen -- 72 Gy in 2.4 Gy fractions -- can safely treat patients with localized prostate cancer with limited grade 2 or 3 late toxicity, according to a study published in the Apr. 1, 2014, edition of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology · Biology · Physics -- Red Journal -- the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Contact: Brittany Ashcroft
press@astro.org
703-839-7336
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Jamming a protein signal forces cancer cells to devour themselves
Inhibiting cancer-promoting prolactin causes unconventional cell death in preclinical research.

Contact: Scott Merville
SMerville@mdanderson.org
713-792-0661
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Tumor suppressor gene TP53 mutated in 90 percent of most common childhood bone tumor
The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project found mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in 90 percent of osteosarcomas, suggesting the alteration plays a key role early in development of the bone cancer. The research was published today online ahead of print in the journal Cell Reports.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Kay Jewelers, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehlau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Sanford-Burnham presents cancer research at AACR
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute will present a wide range of new research data at the annual American Association for Cancer Research Meeting in San Diego starting Saturday, April 5, at the San Diego Convention Center. The presentations will cover a variety of topics including breast, melanoma, and prostate cancer, as well as novel methods of delivering drugs to tumors.

Contact: Susan Gammon, Ph.D., MBA
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-610-3808
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Discovery of a mechanism that makes tumor cells sugar addicted
For almost a hundred years ago is known that cancer cells feel a special appetite for a type of sugar called glucose. The tumor uses this molecule is like the gasoline which depends a sports car to burn faster and grows and multiplies rapidly. It is a little cash process from the energy point of view but allows a superaccelerated cancer cell division. It is what is known as the Warburg effect, which was described in 1927.

Contact: Arantxa Mena
amena@idibell.cat
34-932-607-282
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

Showing releases 951-975 out of 1265.

<< < 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

  Search News Releases

     

 

 

EurekAlert!