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Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1291.

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Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Post-diagnosis aspirin improves survival in all gastrointestinal cancers
Aspirin improves survival in patients with tumors situated throughout the gastrointestinal tract, results from a large study in The Netherlands show.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 27-Sep-2015
ERS International Congress 2015
Differences found between smokers and non-smokers who develop lung cancer
Tobacco smoke is known to be the main risk factor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although non-smokers can get it too. The incidence among non-smokers is increasing in many countries. Now a group of Portuguese researchers has found significant differences in clinical particularities and survival between smokers and non-smokers who develop NSCLC.

Contact: Lauren Anderson
lauren.anderson@europeanlung.org
31-655-467-578
European Lung Foundation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Cancer Discovery
Genetic screening of brain metastases could reveal new targets for treatment
Unravelling the genetic sequences of cancer that has spread to the brain could offer unexpected targets for effective treatment.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Rare cancer responds unusually well to new treatment
Results from a multi-center randomized international trial of an innovative treatment show a marked improvement in the length of time patients with mid-gut neuroendocrine tumors live without the disease getting worse.
Advanced Accelerator Applications

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Childhood cancers in Europe: Progress has been made, but much remains to be done
Each year in Europe, 6,000 young people die from cancer, and two-thirds of those who survive suffer from treatment-related side effects. Although there has been considerable progress in the treatment of childhood cancers over the past few decades, and cancer in childhood is rare, these are major problems that need to be overcome, says a report from SIOPE, the European Society for Paediatric Oncology.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Treatment of elderly breast cancer patients varies between different European countries
Largest international comparison of the treatment of elderly patients with breast cancer have shown there are substantial differences in the use of surgery, hormone therapy and chemotherapy between European countries.
European Society of Surgical Oncology

Contact: Kay Roche
kay@rochewriting.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Results of international trial show promise in rare, difficult to treat cancer
An international team of researchers has shown that the use of the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, can delay tumour growth among both gastrointestinal and lung neuroendocrine tumours. This is particularly important for patients with lung NETs because there is currently no approved treatment for such cases.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
ERS International Congress 2015
Lung cancer survival rates improve with CT scan follow-up
Patients with recurrent lung cancer have better post-surgery survival rates if their management includes a follow-up program based on computer tomography of the chest, according to new findings.

Contact: Lauren Anderson
lauren.anderson@europeanlung.org
31-655-467-578
European Lung Foundation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Differences between tumors of younger and older colorectal cancer patients
Tumors in younger colorectal cancer patients may be molecularly distinct from those of older patients, and that these differences are related to the way genes are switched on and off (epigenetics) in the tumors of the younger patients and may lead to better treatment options.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress
Everolimus improves progression-free survival for patients with advanced, nonfuctional neuroendocrine tumors
In an international Phase III randomized study, everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, has shown to dramatically improve progression-free survival for patients with advanced, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors of the lung and gastrointestinal tract.

Contact: Lany Kimmons
rlkimmons@mdanderson.org
713-563-5801
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
A large real-life study shows trabectedin confers long-term efficacy in STS
A prospective, large real-life study with an investigational transcription inhibitor confers long term-efficacy in patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
PharmaMar

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Cancer Discovery
Genetic profiles of brain metastases differ from those of primary tumors
A new study finds that, while brain metastases share some genetic characteristics with the primary tumors from which they originated, they also carry unique genetic mutations, indicating that the evolutionary pathways of the metastatic and the primary tumors have diverged, which may change sensitivities to targeted therapy drugs.
National Institutes of Health, Brain Science Foundation, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, American Brain Tumor Association, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Mary Kay Foundation

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 26-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Migrants and refugees: Nationality and social status affect cancer care quality
Access to quality cancer care is still a big issue in Europe, and there is great heterogeneity in the availability of drugs, screening programs and resources among countries. Neglected cancer populations exist with lower rates of early diagnosis and treatment compliance. Migrants and refugees are one of those.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Cabozantinib improves survival in patients with advanced kidney cancer
Patients with advanced kidney cancer live for nearly twice as long without their disease progressing if they are treated with cabozantinib, a drug that inhibits the action of tyrosine kinases -- enzymes that function as an 'on' or 'off' switch in many cellular processes, including cancer. The research will be presented in the presidential session of the 2015 European Cancer Congress on Saturday.
Exelixis Inc

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
EUROCARE data show large variations in survival from blood cancers in Europe
Comparisons of cancer patients' survival and care in Europe up to 2007 show that although more patients are surviving for at least five years after diagnosis, there are large variations between countries, which are particularly significant in cancers of the blood. Dr. Milena Sant will tell the 2015 European Cancer Congress that new analysis of data from the EUROCARE 5 study has provided information on patients diagnosed after 2000 in each European country.
Italian Ministry of Health, European Partnership for Action Against Cancer

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
Primary surgery is linked with survival benefit in patients with advanced throat cancer
Patients with cancers of the mid- and lower throat may have higher survival rates if their initial treatment includes surgery, according to new research presented to the 2015 European Cancer Congress on Saturday.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
New England Journal of Medicine
Nivolumab improves overall survival in patients with advanced kidney cancer
The targeted drug nivolumab significantly prolongs survival in patients with advanced kidney cancer, whose disease has progressed after their first treatment, according to results to be presented at the 2015 European Cancer Congress on Saturday and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
Nature Communications
A mutated gene found in families with multiple tumors, including cardiac angiosarcoma
The mutation found in the POT1 gene causes a rare hereditary syndrome in which patients present multiple tumors, including cardiac angiosarcoma (CAS). It is now possible to identify carriers and intervene early. Currently, familial CAS patients have a poor chance of survival because the tumor is diagnosed when it is in an advanced phase. The CNIO's Familial Cancer Consultancy and the Cardiology Unit at the Puerta de Hierro University Hospital have already created a Monitoring Unit to follow-up asymptomatic carriers.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
2015 Experimental Biology
Research shows dried plums can reduce risk of colon cancer
Researchers from Texas A&M University and the University of North Carolina have shown a diet containing dried plums can positively affect microbiota, also referred to as gut bacteria, throughout the colon, helping reduce the risk of colon cancer.
California Dried Plum Board

Contact: Dr. Nancy Turner
n-turner@tamu.edu
979-847-8714
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
EBioMedicine
COPD heightens deadly lung cancer risk in smokers
Smokers who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder may face nearly twice the risk of getting small cell lung cancer -- the deadliest form of lung cancer -- than smokers who don't have COPD, according to a large worldwide study led by researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
European Cancer Congress (ECC2015)
New England Journal of Medicine
Breakthrough study demonstrates survival advantage with immune checkpoint inhibitor for advanced kidney cancer patients
For the first time, an immune checkpoint inhibitor has been proven to increase survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma, a patient population for whom treatment options are currently limited.

Contact: Clayton R. Boldt, Ph.D.
crboldt@mdanderson.org
713-792-9518
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
EBioMedicine
Arteries better than veins for liquid biopsy
Arteries contain higher numbers of circulating tumor cells than veins in uveal melanoma patients, raising a concern for standard technique for detection of tumor cells in the blood.

Contact: Edyta Zielinska
edyta.zielinska@jefferson.edu
215-955-5291
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Childhood brain tumors affect working memory of adult survivors, study finds
Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors have lower working memory performance compared to healthy adults, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Emory University.
American Cancer Society, Georgia State University

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Current Biology
Fungi may lead to cheaper cancer treatment: University of Guelph study
Cheaper anti-cancer drugs for humans might ultimately stem from a new study by University of Guelph scientists into a kind of microbial 'bandage' that protects yew trees from disease-causing fungi. The researchers found that naturally occurring fungi in the yew's vascular system act like an immune system to swarm a wound site and protect against invading pathogens.

Contact: Manish Raizada
raizada@uoguelph.ca
University of Guelph

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Cancer Cell
MD Anderson study identifies leukemia tumor suppressor
A protein-coding gene called hnRNP K has been identified as a tumor suppressor for acute myeloid leukemia, a finding that could be important for investigating how best to target treatment of a blood cancer striking mostly older individuals.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1291.

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