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Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1234.

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Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Gold nanorods attach to, kill bladder cancer cells
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014 demonstrates a novel strategy that accomplishes both: bladder cancer cells overexpress the protein EGFR; gold nanorods can be engineered to attach to EGFR proteins; and then the application of low-intensity laser to the tissue can preferentially heat these gold nanorods, killing the EGFR-rich cancer cells to which they are attached.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
For good and ill, immune response to cancer cuts both ways
The difference between an immune response that kills cancer cells and one that conversely stimulates tumor growth can be as narrow as a 'double-edged sword,' report researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine in the April 7, 2014, online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Samuel and Ruth Engelberg Fellowship at the Cancer Research Institute

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for April 8, 2014
This release contains information about articles being published in Annals of Internal Medicine on April 8, including 'Daily low-dose aspirin may protect against preeclampsia complications' and 'Could controversial Canadian mammography study spark new thinking in the US?'

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
European Urology
Henry Ford Hospital cited: World's first surgical innovators for patient safety standards
An innovative kidney transplant technique developed by Henry Ford Hospital is credited as the first in the world to use a new set of patient safety standards coordinated by the University of Oxford in England. The standards are being assembled and offered as a framework for developing, performing and reporting surgical innovations that, unlike new medical treatments, are not under strict regulations and control.

Contact: Dwight Angell
dwight.angell@hfhs.org
313-850-3471
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Nature Immunology
La Jolla Institute discovers new mechanism for unleashing immune system against cancer
A major discovery that brings a new drug target to the increasingly exciting landscape of cancer immunotherapy was published yesterday by researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and their collaborators from other institutes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Ward
contact@liai.org
619-303-3160
La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Milk thistle extract, silibinin, reduces self-renewal of colorectal cancer stem cells
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014 shows that the chemical silibinin, purified from milk thistle extract, affects cell signaling associated with inflammation and thus also the formation and survival of colorectal cancer stem cells.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Studies reveal more clues on how pregnancy protects against breast cancer
Scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center have unearthed new clues about how pregnancy reduces women's risk of developing breast cancer. The research will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-815-7828
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response
Researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth have found that the body's immune system response was enhanced when they disrupted VISTA, a protein that prevents the immune system from overreacting. Understanding how checkpoint regulators like VISTA function is important to cancer researchers, who hope to use the immune system to attack tumors.
National Institutes of Health, Hitchcock Foundation, Melanoma Research Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council Centre for Transplantation and Biomedical Research Center at King's College London

Contact: Robin Dutcher
robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
29th Annual EAU Congress
New method for prostate cancer detection can save millions of men painful examination
Each year prostate tissue samples are taken from over a million men -- in most cases using 12 large biopsy needles -- to check whether they have prostate cancer. This procedure, which was recently described by an American urology professor as 'barbaric,' shows that 70 percent of the subjects do not have cancer. A patient-friendly examination, which drastically reduces the need for biopsies has been developed at Eindhoven University of Technology, together with AMC Amsterdam.
European Research Council, KWF Dutch Cancer Foundation, Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research

Contact: Massimo Mischi
m.mischi@tue.nl
31-613-269-039
Eindhoven University of Technology

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Novel plant biotechnology approach for sustainable production of pharmaceutical compounds
European scientists have made ground-breaking discoveries for improving the efficiency of the production of pharmaceuticals through plant biotechnology.
European Commission

Contact: Dr. Kirsi-Marja Oksman-Caldentey
kirsi-marja.oksman@vtt.fi
358-207-224-459
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Research yields potential target for epithelial ovarian cancer treatment
Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers who are investigating the biological mechanisms behind metastatic epithelial ovarian cancer recently found that an enzyme called focal adhesive kinase can play a critical -- and previously unstudied -- role in the growth and spread of the disease. The research will be presented on Monday, April 7, at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-815-7828
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Increased risk of developing lung cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer
Women who have radiotherapy for breast cancer have a small but significantly increased risk of subsequently developing a primary lung tumor, and now research has shown that this risk increases with the amount of radiation absorbed by the tissue. The research will be presented at the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO33) in Vienna.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Scientists find potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors
Researchers studying a rare, always fatal brain tumor in children have found several molecular alterations that drive the cancer, according to a new study from scientists at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and McGill University. The findings identify potential new targets for drug treatments. The new research -- published April 6 in Nature Genetics -- could help physicians choose targeted agents with a better chance of combating pediatric high-grade astrocytomas.
National Institutes of Health, others

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-7379
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Six months hormone therapy in addition to radiotherapy improves prostate cancer survival
Men with prostate cancer that is small and confined to the prostate gland but that is at risk of growing and spreading, do better if they are treated with radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy, which lowers their levels of the male hormone, testosterone, according to new research to be presented at the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology in Vienna. The findings are expected to change clinical practice.
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Foundation, AstraZeneca

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Non-invasive imaging instead of repeated biopsy in active monitoring of prostate cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study being presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014 describes a novel method to 'manipulate the lipid metabolism in the cancer cell to trick them to use more radiolabeled glucose, the basis of PET scanning.'

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Amino acid fingerprints revealed in new study
Stuart Lindsay and his colleagues at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute have taken a major step toward the sequencing of proteins, demonstrating the accurate identification of amino acids, by briefly pinning each in a narrow junction between a pair of flanking electrodes and measuring a characteristic chain of current spikes passing through successive amino acid molecules.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Researchers find that renal cancer cells thrive when put in the right environment and supported by a specific enzyme
Tumor cells are picky about where they live. In the wrong environment, they fail to reach their potential. But put those same cells on the right bit of real estate, and they grow like mad. Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center found renal cancer cells planted in a supportive environment proliferate with the help of an enzyme usually only seen in the brain.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-815-7828
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Medicine
Blood test could provide rapid, accurate method of detecting solid cancers
A blood sample could one day be enough to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of cancer in a patient's body and responses to treatment. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a way to quickly bring the technique to the clinic.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Scaffolding protein promotes growth and metastases of epithelial ovarian cancer
Researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center have shown that NEDD9, a scaffolding protein responsible for regulating signaling pathways in the cell, promotes the growth and spread of epithelial ovarian cancer.

Contact: Diana Quattrone
Diana.Quattrone@fccc.edu
215-815-7828
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Gene sequencing project discovers mutations tied to deadly brain tumors in young children
The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has identified new mutations in pediatric brain tumors known as high-grade gliomas, which most often occur in the youngest patients. The research appears today as an advance online publication in the scientific journal Nature Genetics.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Kay Jewelers, National Institutes of Health, Cure Starts Now Found, Smile for Sophie Forever Found

Contact: Carrie Strehlau
carrie.strehau@stjude.org
901-595-2295
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
BJU International
Circumcision could prevent prostate cancer... if it's performed after the age of 35
Researchers at the University of Montreal and the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Institut-Armand-Frappier have shown that men circumcised after the age of 35 were 45 percent less at risk of later developing prostate cancer than uncircumcised men.
Cancer Research Society, Ministère du Développement économique, de l'Innovation et de l'Exportation, Fonds de recherche du Québec Santé

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-566-3813
University of Montreal

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
2014 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting
Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR technology highlighted at the 2014 AACR Annual Meeting
Cancer researchers will showcase new applications of Droplet Digital PCR, including its ability to track mutant DNA in liquid biopsies, and a faster, more cost-effective version for quantifying genetic aberrations.

Contact: Ken Li
kli@chempetitive.com
312-532-4675
Chempetitive Group

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
Zombie cancer cells eat themselves to live
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Cell Reports and presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Conference 2014 shows that the cellular process of autophagy in which cells 'eat' parts of themselves in times of stress may allow cancer cells to recover and divide rather than die when faced with chemotherapies.

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Prognosis of tumors positive for human papilloma virus in head and neck cancers varies according to the site
Researchers have shown for the first time that human papilloma virus status appears to have no prognostic effect on the outcome of primary radiotherapy in head and neck cancer outside the oropharynx (the part of the throat located behind the mouth), and should not be treated with the less intensive treatment strategies that are currently being investigated in clinical trials for HPV+ oropharyngeal tumors.

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Public Release: 5-Apr-2014
ESTRO 33
Helium ions may provide superior, better-targeted treatment in pediatric radiotherapy
For the first time, researchers have been able to demonstrate that the use of helium ions in radiation therapy could provide accurate treatment to tumors while helping to spare healthy organs.
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1234.

<< < 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 > >>

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