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Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1235.

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Public Release: 30-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Myriad presents data on BRACAnalysis CDx and HRD at 2014 ASCO meeting
New data presented at ASCO 2014 support the clinical efficacy of Myriad's BRACAnalysis CDx and HRD tests in predicting platinum based therapy response for breast cancer patients. In addition, the company is providing an update on key commercial milestones that underscore its commitment to the field of companion diagnostics. Myriad also will present data on the likely utility of its HRD test as a more comprehensive companion diagnostic for DNA damaging agents.

Contact: Ronald Rogers
rrogers@myriad.com
908-285-0248
Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Public Release: 30-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Stopping statins may benefit terminally ill patients
Results presented today at ASCO 2014 and at the European Association of Palliative Care Research Conference show that stopping statins for cholesterol management in the late stages of cancer or other terminal illnesses may offer quality-of-life and even life-extending benefits. The results highlight the larger question of when, if ever, it is appropriate in patients with life-limiting illnesses to discontinue medications prescribed for other conditions that will likely not lead to their death.
National Institute of Nursing Research

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
303-524-2780
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 30-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
New drug treatment helps prevent early menopause in breast cancer patients
Among young women treated for breast cancer, one of the most distressing side effects of chemotherapy is early menopause. But a major clinical trial has found that the risk of early menopause can be significantly reduced by adding a drug called goserelin to the chemotherapy regimen. Also, women who took goserelin were more likely to get pregnant and deliver a healthy baby.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 30-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Phase I study of DMOT4039A in patients with pancreatic or ovarian cancer
In this early clinical trial with the goal of identifying possible risks and defining likely dosages, the drug was well tolerated and in some patients showed initial evidence of anti-cancer activity.

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
303-524-2780
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Reduced kidney function associated with higher risk of renal and urothelial cancer
A key measure of reduced kidney function and chronic kidney disease -- reduced glomerular filtration rate -- is an independent risk factor for renal and urothelial cancer, according to a study published online today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cyrus Hedayati
chedayati@golinharris.com
415-318-4377
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Cancer Cell
Melanoma of the eye caused by 2 gene mutations
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a therapeutic target for treating the most common form of eye cancer in adults. They have also, in experiments with mice, been able to slow eye tumor growth with an existing FDA-approved drug.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-May-2014
BJU International
Circumcision linked to reduced risk of prostate cancer in some men
Circumcision is performed for various reasons, including those that are based on religion, aesthetics, or health. New research indicates that the procedure may help prevent prostate cancer in some men. The findings, which are published in BJU International, add to a growing list of advantages to circumcision.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Journal of American Society of Nephrology
Reduced kidney function associated with higher risk of renal and urothelial cancer
Researchers who investigated the level of kidney function and subsequent cancer risk in more than one million adults have found that reduced glomerular filtration rate -- a key measure of reduced kidney function and chronic kidney disease -- is an independent risk factor for renal and urothelial cancer but not other cancer types.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Linda Aagard
linda.aagard@hci.utah.edu
801-587-7639
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 29-May-2014
PLOS ONE
How breast cancer 'expresses itself'
Two Tel Aviv University researchers have found that 'gene regulation,' the process that shuts off certain parts of a cell's DNA code or blueprint in healthy breast tissue cells, may also play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Their research proves a significant link between breast-specific genes and the pathology of cancer.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Diet and exercise in cancer prevention and treatment: Focus of APNM special
This Special Issue titled 'The role of diet, body composition, and physical activity on cancer prevention, treatment, and survivorship' comprises both invited reviews and original papers investigating various themes such as the role of omega-3 fatty acids, amino acids, cancer cachexia, muscle health, exercise training, adiposity and body composition.

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@nrcresearchpress.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 29-May-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Mechanisms of ibrutinib resistance identified in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
A new study has discovered how resistance develops in patients taking ibrutinib, a new and highly effective drug for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Amanda Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 29-May-2014
ASCO 50th Annual Meeting
Rare skin cancer on palms and soles more likely to come back compared to other melanomas
A rare type of melanoma that disproportionately attacks the palms and soles and under the nails of Asians, African-Americans, and Hispanics, who all generally have darker skins, and is not caused by sun exposure, is almost twice as likely to recur than other similar types of skin cancer, according to results of a study in 244 patients.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Nature
Major discovery on the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia and other cancers
A mechanism that enables the development of resistance to acute myeloid leukemia anticancer drugs, thereby leading to relapse, has been identified by Kathy Borden of the University of Montreal's Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer and her collaborators.
National Institutes of Health, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Pharmascience Inc., IRICoR, Cancer Research Chairs, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
rw.raillantclark@gmail.com
514-566-3813
University of Montreal

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Science Translational Medicine
T cell repertoire changes predictive of anti-CTLA-4 cancer immunotherapy outcome revealed
Sequenta Inc. today announced publication of a study that used the company's proprietary LymphoSIGHT immune repertoire sequencing platform to investigate the effects of anti-CTLA-4 antibody on the number and types of T cells present in a patient's blood. The results shed light on the mechanism of action of this type of cancer immunotherapy and suggest that immune repertoire sequencing could be used to predict which patients will have improved survival in response to treatment.

Contact: Erin Davis
erin.davis@sequenta.com
415-640-9624
Sequenta Inc.

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
The scarier the better -- screening results that make smokers stop smoking
Screening for lung cancer leads to early detection and treatment, but can it also make people stop smoking before they get cancer? The answer is that it depends on the seriousness of the results, according to a study published May 28 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 28-May-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Tiny mutation triggers drug resistance for patients with one type of leukemia
Researchers have pinpointed exactly what goes wrong when chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients develop resistance to ibrutinib, a highly effective, precisely targeted anti-cancer drug. The finding could guide development of new agents to treat drug-resistant disease.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Prince Family Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Indoor tanning, even without burning, increases the risk of melanoma
People sometimes use indoor tanning in the belief that this will prevent burns when they tan outdoors. However, indoor tanning raises the risk of developing melanoma even if a person has never had burns from either indoor or outdoor tanning, according to a study published May 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Zachary Rathner
Zachary.Rathner@oup.com
919-677-2697
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Cancer Cell
International collaboration highlights new mechanism explaining how cancer cells spread
UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have identified a protein critical to the spread of deadly cancer cells and determined how it works, paving the way for potential use in diagnosis and eventually possible therapeutic drugs to halt or slow the spread of cancer.
National Institutes of Health, China Postdoctoral Science Foundation

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Annals of Surgical Oncology
NYU researchers pilot educational and behavioral program to reduce lymphedema risk
NYU researchers conducted a pilot study to evaluate a patient-centered educational and behavioral self-care program called The Optimal Lymph Flow. The goals of the program were to promote lymph flow and optimize BMI over a 12-month period after breast cancer surgery. Findings offer initial evidence in support of a shift in the focus of lymphedema care away from treatment and toward proactive risk reduction.
Avon Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: christopher james
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Biomaterials
'Nanodaisies' deliver drug cocktail to cancer cells
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed daisy-shaped, nanoscale structures that are made predominantly of anti-cancer drugs and are capable of introducing a 'cocktail' of multiple drugs into cancer cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Journal of Urology
Study affirms value of epigenetic test for markers of prostate cancer
A multicenter team of researchers report that a commercial test designed to rule out the presence of genetic biomarkers of prostate cancer may be accurate enough to exclude the need for repeat prostate biopsies in many -- if not most -- men.

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Cancer
MRI catches breast cancer early in at-risk survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma
The largest clinical study to evaluate breast cancer screening of female survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma, who are at increased risk because they received chest radiation, shows that magnetic-resonance imaging detected invasive breast tumors at very early stages, when cure rates are expected to be excellent.

Contact: Jane Finlayson
jane.finlayson@uhn.ca
416-946-2846
University Health Network

Public Release: 28-May-2014
BIO International Convention
Artificial lung the size of a sugar cube
What medications can be used to treat lung cancer, and how effective are they? Until now, drug companies have had to rely on animal testing to find out. But in the future, a new 3-D model lung is set to achieve more precise results and ultimately minimize -- or even completely replace -- animal testing. From June 23-26, researchers will be presenting their new model at the BIO International Convention in San Diego, Calif.

Contact: Dr. Heike Walles
heike.walles@igb.fraunhofer.de
49-931-318-8828
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 27-May-2014
American Urological Association Annual Conference
Vanderbilt study finds women referred for bladder cancer less often than men
Women with blood in their urine were less than half as likely as men with the same issue to be referred to a urologist for further tests, according to a new Vanderbilt University study.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-May-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI online ahead of print table of contents for May 27, 2014
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers published online, May 27, 2014, in the JCI: 'Disturbed blood flow induces epigenetic alterations to promote atherosclerosis,' 'Protecting dopaminergic neurons from Parkinson's disease-associated degradation,' 'Splicing regulator SLU7 is essential for maintaining liver homeostasis,' 'Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression,' 'WNT5A enhances resistance of melanoma cells to targeted BRAF inhibitors,' and more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Showing releases 976-1000 out of 1235.

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