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Portal: Bioinformatics

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 721.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Norovirus in food outlets to be mapped for the first time
The University of Liverpool is leading a 2 million Food Standards Agency project to map the occurrence of norovirus in food premises and industry workers.
Food Standards Agency

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-2248
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
FEBS EMBO 2014
EMBO Gold Medal 2014 awarded to Sophie Martin
EMBO today announced Sophie Martin of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, as the winner of the 2014 EMBO Gold Medal. The award acknowledges her work to understand the molecular events that define the organization and development of the cell.
European Molecular Biology Organization

Contact: Barry Whyte
communications@embo.org
49-622-188-91108
European Molecular Biology Organization

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Argentina joins EMBL as associate member state
At a signing ceremony in Buenos Aires yesterday, Argentina joined the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) as an associate member state. The move strengthens the ties between the European and Latin American life science communities. It grants Argentinian scientists access to EMBL's world-class facilities and programs, and stimulates mutually beneficial collaborations.

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Stem cells in circulating blood affect cardiovascular health, study finds
New research suggests that attempts to isolate an elusive adult stem cell from blood to understand and potentially improve cardiovascular health -- a task considered possible but very difficult -- might not be necessary.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicanor Moldovan
Moldovan.6@osu.edu
614-247-7801
Ohio State University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
AMP publishes curriculum recommendations for medical laboratory scientists
The Association for Molecular Pathology released a report today in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on recommendations for a molecular diagnostics curriculum at both the baccalaureate and master's levels of education.

Contact: Catherine Davidge
cdavidge@amp.org
Association for Molecular Pathology

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Getting at the root of the mountain pine beetle's rapid habitat expansion and forest
The mountain pine beetle has wreaked havoc in North America, across forests from the American Southwest to British Columbia and Alberta, with the potential to spread all the way to the Atlantic coast. Using a newly sequenced beetle genome, authors Janes, et.al. examined how the pine beetle could undergo such rapid habitat range expansion.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Computational Biology
Simulating in tiny steps gave birth to long-sought-after method
Using computer simulations to predict which drug candidates offer the greatest potential has thus far not been very reliable, because both small drug-like molecules and the amino acids of proteins vary so much in their chemistry. Uppsala researchers have now cunningly managed to develop a method that has proven to be precise, reliable and general.

Contact: Johan Åqvist
johan.aqvist@icm.uu.se
46-704-250-404
Uppsala University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
TGen honors Catherine Ivy and Craig Jackson with Leadership; Collaborative Spirit awards
The Translational Genomics Research Institute recently honored two significant Arizona philanthropists at their annual Founders Dinner for their support of TGen's research into brain, colon and prostate cancer. The event took place March 28 in Scottsdale.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award
Adam Arkin, director of Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, has been named one of six recipients of the 2013 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award by US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neuron
Scientists explain how memories stick together
Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, post-traumatic stress and learning disabilities.

Contact: Chris Emery
Cemery@salk.edu
301-873-6952
Salk Institute

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Anasys licenses ORNL nanoscale mass spectrometry imaging technology
Anasys Instruments Corp. has licensed a technology that allows for simultaneous chemical and physical characterization and could lead to advances in materials and drug development.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-1946
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature
Stanford team develops single cell genomics technique to reverse engineer developing lung
In a feat of reverse tissue engineering, Stanford researchers took lung cells from the embryos of mice at different points in their development cycles; using single-cell genomic analysis, they recorded what genes were active in each cell at each time. They studied lung cells, but the technique is applicable to any type of cell. 'This lays out a playbook for how to do reverse tissue engineering,' said Stephen Quake, research team leader.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Finding the switch: Researchers create roadmap for gene expression
In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a roadmap that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases. Their work also sheds new light on how heredity and environment can affect gene expression.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tracey Peake
tracey_peake@ncsu.edu
919-515-6142
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer
All cancer-causing processes leave a distinct mutational imprint or signature on the genomes of patients. A team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has found a major piece of biological evidence to support the role a group of virus-fighting genes has in cancer development. The mutational signature left by the cancer-causing process driven by this family of genes is found in half of all cancer types.

Contact: Mary Clarke
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-95328
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
eLife
Planaria deploy an ancient gene expression program in the course of organ regeneration
In the April 15, 2014, issue of the online journal eLife, Stowers Institute for Medical Research Investigator Alejandro Sanchez Alvarado and colleagues report the identification of genes that worms use to rebuild an amputated pharynx.
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kim Bland, Ph.D.
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Clinical & Experimental Metastasis
TGen identifies growth factor receptors that may prompt metastatic spread of lung cancer
Two cell surface receptors might be responsible for the most common form of lung cancer spreading to other parts of the body, according to a study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute. The hepatocyte growth factor receptor and fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 are proteins associated with the potential spread of non-small cell lung cancer, according to the TGen study published online April 8 by the scientific journal Clinical & Experimental Metastasis.
National Institutes of Health, St. Joseph's Foundation, American Lung Association

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Nature
UC San Diego researchers develop bacterial 'FM radio'
A team of biologists and engineers at UC San Diego has developed a 'rapid and tunable post-translational coupling' for genetic circuits.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Genome Research
Genome sequencing of MRSA infection predicts disease severity
The spread of the antibiotic-resistant pathogen MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) remains a concerning public health problem, especially among doctors trying to determine appropriate treatment options for infected patients. In a study published online today in Genome Research, researchers used the genome sequence of MRSA to predict which isolates were highly toxic, thus potentially personalizing the treatment of individual MRSA infections.
European Commission, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Royal Society

Contact: Laura DeMare
ldemare@cshl.edu
516-422-4012
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014
TGen Dr. Michael Barrett awarded $200,000 grant at national cancer conference in San Diego
The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and the American Association for Cancer Research awarded a $200,000 grant today to Dr. Michael Barrett of the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Dr. Barrett, an Associate Professor in TGen's Clinical Translational Research Division, was one of 14 'outstanding scientists' across the nation named to receive a total of $5 million in grants for pancreatic cancer research.
Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, American Association for Cancer Research

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Nature Conservation
Improved access to integrated biodiversity data for science, practice, and policy
The world's biodiversity faces an ongoing decline and closer interaction between science and policy has been proposed as a main route towards improvement. A recent paper, published in the open access journal Nature Conservation, points out how the EU-funded project EU BON will contribute towards a more efficient science-policy dialogue for biodiversity.

Contact: Dr. Christoph Häuser
christoph.haeuser@mfn-berlin.de
49-030-209-38479
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Genetics
New method confirms humans and Neandertals interbred
Technical objections to the idea that Neandertals interbred with the ancestors of Eurasians have been overcome, thanks to a genome analysis method described in the April 2014 issue of the journal GENETICS. The technique can more confidently detect the genetic signatures of interbreeding than previous approaches and will be useful for evolutionary studies of other ancient or rare DNA samples.
National Environmental Research Council UK

Contact: Tracey DePellegrin Connelly
tracey.depellegrin@thegsajournals.org
412-760-5391
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seeing double: New study explains evolution of duplicate genes
From time to time, living cells will accidentally make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity. A new study shows one way that some duplicate genes could have long-ago escaped elimination from the genome, leading to the genetic innovation seen in modern life.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic predisposition to liking amphetamine reduces risk of schizophrenia and ADHD
Genetic variants associated with enjoying the effects of d-amphetamine -- the active ingredient in Adderall -- are also associated with a reduced risk for developing schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, report scientists from the University of Chicago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on April 7. The results support a long-standing hypothesis that dopamine, the neurotransmitter connected with the euphoric effects of amphetamine, is related to schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
The EMBO Journal
Some long non-coding RNAs are conventional after all
Researchers have come full circle and predicted that some long non-coding RNAs can give rise to small proteins that have biological functions. A recent study in The EMBO Journal describes how researchers have used ribosome profiling to identify several hundred long non-coding RNAs that may give rise to small peptides.

Contact: Barry Whyte
barry.whyte@embo.org
European Molecular Biology Organization

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Synthetic biology lab backed by 2 million award
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have been awarded 2M to build a state-of-the-art DNA synthesis facility, a capability offering much needed tools for genome engineering to the academic and private sectors.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-2248
University of Liverpool

Showing releases 1-25 out of 721.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>