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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 712.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
InSilico Medicine announces collaboration -- Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories
Insilico Medicine will fund CCARL's pilot research study in personalized medicine and aging research.

Contact: Michael Petr
michael.petr@insilicomedicine.com
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
To wilt or not to wilt
Plant breeders have long identified and cultivated disease-resistant varieties. A research team at the University of California, Riverside has now revealed a new molecular mechanism for resistance and susceptibility to a common fungus that causes wilt in susceptible tomato plants.
Los Alamos National Laboratory-UC Riverside Collaborative Program in Infectious Disease.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Ecological Informatics
Beyond LOL cats, social networks could become trove of biodiversity data
Vijay Barve demonstrated social networks to be a viable source for photo-vouchered biodiversity records, especially those that clarify which species exist in what places within developing nations.

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
blynch@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Cell
Reading a biological clock in the dark
Proper coordination between our gut bacteria and our biological clocks may be crucial for preventing obesity and glucose intolerance.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Partnership with national laboratory brings latest diagnostic tests to university
A Kansas State University veterinary medicine team is partnering with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to bring the latest diagnostic tools to the university and provide opportunities for students.
Kansas National Bio and Agro-defense Facility Transition Fund

Contact: Raymond "Bob" Rowland
rrowland@k-state.edu
785-532-4631
Kansas State University

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Nature Genetics
High-speed evolution in the lab
Organisms require flexible genomes in order to adapt to changes in the environment. Scientists from the Vetmeduni Vienna study genomes of entire populations. They want to know why individuals differ from each other and how these differences are encoded in the DNA. In two review papers published in the journals Nature Reviews Genetics and Heredity, they discuss why DNA sequencing of entire groups can be an efficient and cost-effective way to answer these questions.

Contact: Susanna Kautschitsch
susanna.kautschitsch@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-1153
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New Univeristy of Virginia study upends current theories of how mitochondria began
Parasitic bacteria were the first cousins of the mitochondria that power cells in animals and plants -- and first acted as energy parasites in cells before becoming beneficial, according to a new University of Virginia study.

Contact: Fariss Samarrai
fls4f@virginia.edu
434-924-3778
University of Virginia

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
NYU Langone Medical Center to lead multi-institutional MRSA research funded by the NIH
NYU Langone Medical Center will lead National Institutes of Health funded research to discover the functional immunology and microbial genetics of staphylococcus aureus, one of the most common pathogens leading to life-threatening blood-borne infections.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jim Mandler
jim.mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
How the fruit fly could help us sniff out drugs and bombs
A fly's sense of smell could be used in new technology to detect drugs and bombs, new University of Sussex research has found.
CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Jacqui Bealing
press@sussex.ac.uk
44-127-367-8888
University of Sussex

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Nature Biotechnology
New discovery will enhance yield and quality of cereal and bioenergy crops
A team of scientists led by Thomas Brutnell, Ph.D., have developed a new way of identifying genes that are important for photosynthesis in maize, and in rice.

Contact: Melanie Bernds
mbernds@danforthcenter.org
314-587-1647
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Taxonomy -- the Leopoldina publishes recommendations on researching biodiversity
With a view to making optimal use of the new opportunities available to taxonomy, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina recommends, in its statement entitled 'Challenges and Opportunities of Integrative Taxonomy for Research and Society,' promoting efforts to describe all the species of Central Europe. The statement also calls for investments in taxonomic research and teaching.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann
presse@leopoldina.org
49-345-472-39800
Leopoldina

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Researchers to receive $4.4 million from NIH to harness biomedical data 'goldmines'
San Diego researchers at The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Translational Science Institute will receive more than $4.4 million as part of a National Institutes of Health initiative called 'Big Data to Knowledge.'
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
University of Chicago establishes national center to study genetics of drug abuse in rats
The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded the University of Chicago a $12 million, five year grant to establish a national Center of Excellence to study drug abuse-associated behaviors by conducting research with rats. The NIDA Center for Genome-Wide Association Studies in Outbred Rats will combine complex behavioral studies with recent technological advances in rat genetics to help scientists shed light on the genes behind drug addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
University of Illinois, Mayo Clinic collaborate to revolutionize genomic data analysis
Today's researchers have unleashed a river of valuable biomedical data. In 2012, the National Institutes of Health created the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative to enable efforts to harness the potential of this flood of information. As part of the first wave of BD2K funding, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Mayo Clinic have now received a $9.34M, 4-year award to create one of several new Centers of Excellence for Big Data Computing.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicholas Vasi
nvasi@illinois.edu
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
PLOS Currents: Outbreaks
The mathematics behind the Ebola epidemic
Researchers in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich have calculated new benchmark figures to precisely describe the Ebola epidemic in West Africa from a mathematical perspective. Their results may help health authorities to contain the epidemic.

Contact: Tanja Stadler
tanja.stadler@bsse.ethz.ch
41-613-873-410
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Cell
New computational approach finds gene that drives aggressive brain cancer
Using an innovative algorithm that analyzes gene regulatory and signaling networks, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that loss of a gene called KLHL9 is the driving force behind the most aggressive form of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lucky Tran
lt2549@columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
UCLA awarded $11 million to lead NIH Center of Excellence for Big Data computing
The National Institutes of Health have awarded University of California Los Angeles $11 million to form a Center for Excellence for Big Data Computing. Part of an initial $32 million outlay for the $656 million Big Data to Knowledge initiative, the University of California Los Angeles center will develop new strategies for mining the mind-boggling surge in complex biomedical data sets known as Big Data
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
New award accelerates Biodesign's efforts in synthetic biology
John Chaput, a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and research investigator in the Biodesign Institute will lead ASU's effort to evolve TNA molecules that fold into novel 3D shapes with ligand binding affinity and catalytic activity. The research is part of a new Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program called Folded Non-Natural Polymers with Biological Function (Fold F(x)), which plans to use synthetic polymers to address rapidly emerging health and defense threats.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Integrative Biology
Researchers turn computers into powerful allies in the fight against AIDS
The battle against AIDS cannot be won in the laboratory alone. To fight the potentially deadly virus that 34 million people are suffering from we need help from computers. Now research from University of Southern Denmark turns computers into powerful allies in the battle.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Improving biology education: A numbers game
Math is increasingly important to understanding and investigating the world of biology because quantitative biology, computational biology, and computer-based modeling approaches have emerged as important modes of inquiry. But, says the University of Pittsburgh's Samuel Donovan, teaching methods haven't always kept pace with developments in the field.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Miksch
jmiksch@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
A glimpse into the 3-D brain: How memories form
People who wish to know how memory works are forced to take a glimpse into the brain. They can now do so without bloodshed: RUB researchers have developed a new method for creating 3-D models of memory-relevant brain structures. They published their results in the trade journal 'Frontiers in Neuroanatomy.'
Mercator Foundation

Contact: Dr. Martin Pyka
m.pyka@rub.de
49-234-322-4682
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
American Journal of Human Genetics
DNA 'bias' may keep some diseases in circulation, Penn biologists show
In a new study published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, University of Pennsylvania researchers Joseph Lachance and Sarah A. Tishkoff investigated the process known as gene conversion in the context of the evolution of human populations. They found that a bias toward certain types of DNA sequences during gene conversion may be an important factor in why certain heritable diseases persist in populations around the world.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Science
Thermotolerant yeast can provide more climate-smart ethanol
With a simple mutation, yeast can grow in higher than normal temperatures. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology demonstrate this in an article to be published in the scientific journal Science. The findings may result in ethanol being more effectively manufactured for vehicle fuel, as well as increase the possibility of using residual waste as a raw material.
The Novo Nordisk Foundation, European Research Council, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Johanna Wilde
johanna.wilde@chalmers.se
46-317-722-029
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
UT Arlington big data analytics could yield better treatment for pain management
A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Showing releases 1-25 out of 712.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>