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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 782.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Cladistics
Study maps travel of H7 influenza genes
In a new bioinformatics analysis of the H7N9 influenza virus that has recently infected humans in China, researchers trace the separate phylogenetic histories of the virus's genes, giving a frightening new picture of viruses where the genes are traveling independently in the environment, across large geographic distances and between species, to form 'a new constellation of genes -- a new disease, based not only on H7, but other strains of influenza.'

Contact: James Hathaway
jbhathaw@uncc.edu
704-687-5743
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
BioScience
Next-generation sequencing offers insight into how species adapt to climate change
Next-generation sequencing allows for the creation and analysis of vast amounts of data about populations and their responses to shifting environmental conditions, including climate change. These data can provide fine-scale information at the genomic level into populations' adaptations to changing circumstances. Despite the potential usefulness of next-generation sequencing for environmental scientists, it is a costly tool, and funding has yet to equal the value that it may provide.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@gmail.com
703-517-1362
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Nature Genetics
Harnessing data from Nature's great evolutionary experiment
Researchers at CSHL have developed a new computational method to identify which letters in the human genome are functionally important. Their computer program, called fitCons, harnesses the power of evolution, comparing changes in DNA letters across not just related species, but also between multiple individuals in a single species. The results provide a surprising picture of just how little of our genome has been 'conserved' by Nature.
National Institutes of Health, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, Cornell Center for Comparative and Population Genomics

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Applications in Plant Sciences
Mapping the maize genome
Maize is one of the most important cereal crops in the world. The complete genome of maize has been sequenced, but its size and complexity presents a challenge to researchers seeking to identify specific genes responsible for traits. Positional cloning has been used successfully in smaller genomes; researchers have applied this mapping technique to the maize genome and have published their protocol -- the first detailed step-by-step protocol on positional cloning -- in Applications in Plant Sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
Botanical Society of America

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Nature Biotechnology
Hidden cell types revealed
A new method improves single-cell genomics analyses. This method clarifies the true differences and similarities between cells by modelling relatedness and removing confounding variables. Scientists can use known molecular pathways to better understand cancer cells, differentiation processes and the pathogenesis of diseases.
European Research Council, European Commission Marie Curie Fellowship, European Molecular Biology Organization

Contact: Mary Todd Bergman
mary@ebi.ac.uk
44-012-234-94665
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
IPBES-3
Early returns on 2014 show significant growth in use of GBIF
Preliminary statistics suggest that worldwide use of and interest in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility grew significantly during 2014. While thorough analysis will require more time, GBIF Secretariat's ongoing monitoring program of scientific research literature suggests a 35 percent increase during 2014 in the use and citation of biodiversity data accessed via GBIF's open-access infrastructure. More people -- 738,649 users from 236 countries -- have visited GBIF.org more often, too, logging more than 1.13 million sessions during 2014.

Contact: Kyle Copas
kcopas@gbif.org
45-35-32-14-75
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Pitt study links biomarkers to long-term kidney damage and death in critically ill
High levels of two novel urinary biomarkers early in critical illness are associated with adverse long-term outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), according to an international, multi-center study led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Researchers. AKI is a condition that often affects those in intensive care and can occur hours to days after serious infections, surgery or taking certain medications.
Astute Medical, Inc.

Contact: Rick Pietzak
pietzakr@upmc.edu
412-864-4151
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Bioinformatics
Software created to help find a cure for a 'great neglected disease'
For decades, scientists around the world have worked to develop a treatment for schistosomiasis, a debilitating water-born parasite. To aid this research, scientists at San Francisco State University have developed software that helps assess the impact of a drug on the parasite. Singh and his team recently completed the Quantal Dose Response Calculator, software that analyzes images showing the effects of potential drugs on parasites and quantifies their effectiveness.

Contact: Beth Tagawa
btagawa@sfsu.edu
415-338-6745
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Applications in Plant Sciences
One pipeline that combines many gene-finding tools
MAKER2 is an annotation pipeline that combines multiple programs into a single bioinformatics tool that can produce genome annotations even with limited data. In a study in a recent issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, researchers develop a MAKER2 workflow using the phylogenetically challenging genus Penstemon to create a large-scale data set from limited genomic data. A sample protocol, sequence libraries, functional annotation files, and other resources are also provided.

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
Botanical Society of America

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
Leopoldina publishes recommendations on handling changes in the life sciences
Modern high-throughput screening methods for analyzing genetic information, proteins and metabolic products offer new ways of obtaining large quantities of data on life processes. These OMICS technologies are fueling hopes of major advances in, e.g., medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, food sciences. The report 'Life sciences in transition' by Germany's National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina sets out recommendations on how existing deficiencies can be overcome and research better equipped for the challenges.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann
presse@leopoldina.org
49-345-472-39800
Leopoldina

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Eight graduate students and postdocs receive GSA's DeLill Nasser Award
The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is proud to name eight early-career scientists -- four graduate students and four postdoctoral researchers -- as spring 2015 recipients of GSA's DeLill Nasser Award for Professional Development in Genetics. The award provides a $1,000 travel grant for each recipient to attend any national or international meeting, conference, or laboratory course that will enhance his or her career.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
press@genetics-gsa.org
202-412-1120
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
The 'Berlin patient,' first and only person cured of HIV, speaks out
Timothy Ray Brown, long known only as the 'Berlin Patient' had HIV for 12 years before he became the first person in the world to be cured of the infection following a stem cell transplant in 2007. He recalls his many years of illness, a series of difficult decisions, and his long road to recovery in the first-person account, 'I Am the Berlin Patient: A Personal Reflection,' published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of Cell Biology
When DNA gets sent to time-out
For a skin cell to do its job, it must turn on a completely different set of genes than a liver cell -- and keep genes it doesn't need switched off. One way of turning off large groups of genes at once is to send them to 'time-out' at the edge of the nucleus. New research shows how DNA gets sent to the nucleus' far edge, a process critical to controlling genes and determining cell fate.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
UMMS to develop a model for predicting gene expression in dendritic cells
Deciphering the language of gene expression, UMMS scientists Jeremy Luban, M.D., and Manuel Garber, Ph.D., received $6.1 million from the NIH to develop a model system for exploring gene regulation using human dendritic cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2000
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Cell Reports
Imaging linking cell activity and behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind
An automated method (much more sensitive than fMRI) to detect the activity of neurons during specific behaviors, at the resolution of individual brain cells throughout the entire mouse brain, has been successfully demonstrated. A team shows brain activation patterns when male mice perform two critical tasks: recognizing other individuals and determining the sex of another individual.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation for Autism Research, Allen Institute for Brain Science, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Dec-2014
Molecular Cell
Penn scientists identify patterns of RNA regulation in the nuclei of plants
In a new study done in plants, University of Pennsylvania biologists give a global view of the patterns that can affect the various RNA regulatory processes that occur before these molecules move into the cytoplasm, where they are translated into the proteins that make up a living organism.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Molecular Systems Biology
Molecular network identified underlying autism spectrum disorders
Researchers in the United States have identified a molecular network that comprises many of the genes previously shown to contribute to autism spectrum disorders. The findings provide a map of some of the crucial protein interactions that contribute to autism and will help uncover novel candidate genes for the disease.

Contact: Barry Whyte
barry.whyte@embo.org
EMBO

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Funding ended for University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center
Funding has not been renewed for the five-year-old University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center (UC-HiPACC). UC-HiPACC fostered collaborations of astrophysicists across the UC system and three DOE labs, including attracting students and funding. 'Its loss is devastating,' says director Joel Primack. Alternative funding is now being sought. A No-Cost Extension to the grant through March 31, 2015, will support limited operations: the pioneering AGORA research effort, preparation of a five-year report, and crafting of proposals.

Contact: Joel R. Primack
joel@ucsc.edu
831-345-8960
University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Penn and UGA awarded $23.4 million contract for pathogen genomics database
A five-year, $23.4 million contract from the National Institutes of Health will support a growing database of genomic information about disease-causing microbes, co-directed by the University of Pennsylvania's David Roos.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Science
RNA measurements may yield less insight about gene expression than assumed
The majority of RNA expression differences between individuals have no connection to the abundance of a corresponding protein, report scientists from the University of Chicago and Stanford University in Science on Dec. 18. The findings point to a yet-unidentified cellular mechanism that regulates gene expression and suggest studies that rely only on RNA measurements to characterize gene function require further analysis.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Science
'Hairclip' protein mechanism explained
A new study describes, for the first time, a fundamental mechanism regulating a protein's shape. The 'Hairclip' mechanism involves mutations acting on one side of a protein to open or close the configuration of amino acids on the other. The findings have implications for the manipulation of proteins, with potential applications in biotechnology and drug development.
Nakajima Foundation, Swiss National Science Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Bergen Forskningsstiftelse, UK Medical Research Council

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
contactpress@ebi.ac.uk
49-062-213-878-263
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
ZooKeys
Better focus at the micro world: A low-budget focus stacking system for mass digitization
A team of Belgian researchers constructed a focus stacking set-up made of consumer grade products with better end results than high-end solutions and this at only a tenth of the prize of current existing systems. Because of the operational ease, speed and the low cost of the system, it is ideal for mass digitization programs involving type specimens. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Jonathan Brecko
jonathan.brecko@naturalsciences.be
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
UTSA engineers receive $1.08 million NIH grant to advance breast cancer research
The National Institutes of Health recently awarded a $1.08 million grant to the University of Texas at San Antonio to combine computational modeling with biological information to advance our understanding of what may cause breast cells to become cancerous.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: KC Gonzalez
kc.gonzalez@utsa.edu
210-458-7555
University of Texas at San Antonio

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
First steps for Hector the robot stick insect
A research team at Bielefeld University has succeeded in teaching the only robot of its kind in the world how to walk. Its first steps have been recorded in a video. You can watch them in Bielefeld University's latest posting on 'research_tv'. The robot is called Hector, and its construction is modeled on a stick insect.

Contact: Dr. Axel Schneider
axel.schneider@uni-bielefeld.de
49-521-106-5163
Bielefeld University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Brain
'Microlesions' in epilepsy discovered by novel technique
Using an innovative technique combining genetic analysis and mathematical modeling with some basic sleuthing, researchers have identified previously undescribed microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients. The millimeter-sized abnormalities may explain why areas of the brain that appear normal can produce severe seizures in many children and adults with epilepsy.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Showing releases 151-175 out of 782.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>