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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 730.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Telemedicine and e-Health
GaitTrack app makes cellphone a medical monitor for heart and lung patients
By simply carrying around their cellphones, patients who suffer from chronic disease could soon have an accurate health monitor that warns their doctors when their symptoms worsen. Unlike apps that merely count steps, GaitTrack, an app developed by researchers at the University of Illinois, uses eight motion parameters to perform a detailed analysis of a person's gait, or walking pattern, which can tell physicians much about the patient's cardiopulmonary, muscular and neurological health.
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Molecular Ecology Resources
Using genetics to measure the environmental impact of salmon farming
Determining species diversity makes it possible to estimate the impact of human activity on marine ecosystems accurately. The environmental effects of salmon farming have been assessed, until now, by visually identifying the animals living in the marine sediment samples collected at specific distances from farming sites. A team led by Jan Pawlowski, professor at the Faculty of Science of the University of Geneva, Switzerland, analyzed this type of sediment using a technique known as 'DNA barcoding' that targets certain micro-organisms.

Contact: Jan Pawlowski
jan.pawlowski@unige.ch
41-223-793-069
Université de Genève

Public Release: 7-May-2014
IU biologists receive $6.2 million to advance research on bacterial evolution
Indiana University biologists will receive over $6.2 million from the US Army Research Office to study how bacteria evolve in response to both their internal, population-influenced environments and their external natural environment.
US Army Research Office

Contact: Steve Chaplin
stjchap@iu.edu
812-856-1896
Indiana University

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Genetics
Statistical test increases power of genetic studies of complex disease
The power of genome-wide association studies to detect genetic influences on human disease can be substantially increased using a statistical testing framework reported in the May issue of the journal GENETICS.

Contact: Tracey DePellegrin Connelly
tracey.depellegrin@thegsajournals.org
412-760-5391
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 6-May-2014
TGen and George Mason University announce precision medicine alliance to benefit patients
The Translational Genomics Research Institute and George Mason University today announced the creation of a strategic research alliance to benefit patients with cancer and other life-threatening illnesses. The TGen-George Mason Molecular Medicine Alliance is a groundbreaking effort in precision medicine, which recommends to clinicians the best medications and treatments based on each patient's molecular profile.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 5-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Where DNA's copy machine pauses, cancer could be next
A comprehensive mapping of the 'fragile sites' where chromosomes are more likely to experience breakage shows the damage appears in specific areas of the genome where the DNA copying machinery is slowed or stalled during replication, either by certain sequences of DNA or by structural elements. The May 5 PNAS study could give insight into the origins of many of the genetic abnormalities seen in solid tumors.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 5-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UEA research identifies molecules that guide embryonic heart-forming cells
Reserach from the University of East Anglia reveals how cells that form the heart in developing embryos are guided to move into the correct place. It is hoped that the findings will help researchers better understand how congenital heart defects happen during the early stages of pregnancy.
British Heart Foundation

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 2-May-2014
BMC Genomics
Novel analyses improve identification of cancer-associated genes from microarray data
Researchers a the Dartmouth Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences developed a new gene expression analysis approach for identifying cancer genes. The paper entitled, 'How to get the most from microarray data: advice from reverse genomics,' was published online March 21, 2014, in BMC Genomics. The study results challenge the current paradigm of microarray data analysis and suggest that the new method may improve identification of cancer-associated genes.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Derik Hertel
derik.hertel@dartmouth.edu
603-650-1211
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
CNIO team presents a new strategy to personalise cancer therapies
Researchers led by Manuel Hidalgo, Vice-Director of Translational Research at CNIO, have developed a new strategy to personalized medicine in advanced cancer patients with a poor prognosis. The study has been published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. Applying this new tool, the treatments induced clinical responses in up to 77 percent of patients, either through the stabilization of their condition or through a partial clinical response.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
New analysis of 7 ant genomes reveals clues to longer life spans associated with sociality
In a new study, published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, J. Roux, et al. tried to uncover which genes could be involved in ant-specific adaptations, notably in relation to the evolution of complex social systems and division of labor.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
MBEpress@gmail.com
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Genome Research
Immunogenic mutations in tumor genomes correlate with increased patient survival
Developing immunotherapies for cancer is challenging because of significant variability among tumors and diversity in human immune types. In a study published online today in Genome Research, researchers examined the largest collection of tumor samples to date to predict patient-specific tumor mutations that may activate the patient's immune system, paving the way for more successful, personalized cancer immunotherapy.
BC Cancer Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, US Department of Defense

Contact: Peggy Calicchia
calicchi@cshl.edu
516-422-4012
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
Science
Tsetse fly genetic code sequenced
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have been part of a 10-year project which has successfully sequenced the genetic code of the tsetse fly -- making major advances in disease control possible.
Wellcome Trust, World Health Organisation, Ambrose Monell Foundation

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-2248
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
ESA to publish the Journal of Insect Science
The Entomological Society of America is very pleased to announce that it has assumed ownership of the Journal of Insect Science from the University of Wisconsin.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Science
You may have billions and billions of good reasons for being unfit
Although our chromosomes are relatively stable within our lifetimes, the genetic material found in our mitochondria is highly variable across individuals and may impact upon human health, say researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine Hospital.
Genome Quebec, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Quebec's Network of Applied Medical Genetics, Fonds de recherche du Québec -- Santé, Fonds de recherche du Québec -- Nature et technologies, Banting and FRSQ Fellowship Programs, and others

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Norovirus in food outlets to be mapped for the first time
The University of Liverpool is leading a £2 million Food Standards Agency project to map the occurrence of norovirus in food premises and industry workers.
Food Standards Agency

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-2248
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
FEBS EMBO 2014
EMBO Gold Medal 2014 awarded to Sophie Martin
EMBO today announced Sophie Martin of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, as the winner of the 2014 EMBO Gold Medal. The award acknowledges her work to understand the molecular events that define the organization and development of the cell.
European Molecular Biology Organization

Contact: Barry Whyte
communications@embo.org
49-622-188-91108
EMBO

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Argentina joins EMBL as associate member state
At a signing ceremony in Buenos Aires yesterday, Argentina joined the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) as an associate member state. The move strengthens the ties between the European and Latin American life science communities. It grants Argentinian scientists access to EMBL's world-class facilities and programs, and stimulates mutually beneficial collaborations.

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Stem cells in circulating blood affect cardiovascular health, study finds
New research suggests that attempts to isolate an elusive adult stem cell from blood to understand and potentially improve cardiovascular health -- a task considered possible but very difficult -- might not be necessary.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicanor Moldovan
Moldovan.6@osu.edu
614-247-7801
Ohio State University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
AMP publishes curriculum recommendations for medical laboratory scientists
The Association for Molecular Pathology released a report today in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on recommendations for a molecular diagnostics curriculum at both the baccalaureate and master's levels of education.

Contact: Catherine Davidge
cdavidge@amp.org
Association for Molecular Pathology

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Getting at the root of the mountain pine beetle's rapid habitat expansion and forest
The mountain pine beetle has wreaked havoc in North America, across forests from the American Southwest to British Columbia and Alberta, with the potential to spread all the way to the Atlantic coast. Using a newly sequenced beetle genome, authors Janes, et.al. examined how the pine beetle could undergo such rapid habitat range expansion.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-258-8972
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Computational Biology
Simulating in tiny steps gave birth to long-sought-after method
Using computer simulations to predict which drug candidates offer the greatest potential has thus far not been very reliable, because both small drug-like molecules and the amino acids of proteins vary so much in their chemistry. Uppsala researchers have now cunningly managed to develop a method that has proven to be precise, reliable and general.

Contact: Johan Åqvist
johan.aqvist@icm.uu.se
46-704-250-404
Uppsala University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
TGen honors Catherine Ivy and Craig Jackson with Leadership; Collaborative Spirit awards
The Translational Genomics Research Institute recently honored two significant Arizona philanthropists at their annual Founders Dinner for their support of TGen's research into brain, colon and prostate cancer. The event took place March 28 in Scottsdale.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award
Adam Arkin, director of Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, has been named one of six recipients of the 2013 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award by US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neuron
Scientists explain how memories stick together
Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, post-traumatic stress and learning disabilities.

Contact: Chris Emery
Cemery@salk.edu
301-873-6952
Salk Institute

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Anasys licenses ORNL nanoscale mass spectrometry imaging technology
Anasys Instruments Corp. has licensed a technology that allows for simultaneous chemical and physical characterization and could lead to advances in materials and drug development.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-1946
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 226-250 out of 730.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>