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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 712.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
A molecular mechanism involved in cellular proliferation characterized
Researchers from Guillermo Montoya's team at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, in collaboration with Isabelle Vernos' Group from the CRG, have uncovered the molecular interaction between TACC3 and chTOG, key proteins in forming the internal cellular framework that enables and sustains cell division. Published today in Nature Communications, the observations may help to optimize current oncological therapies specifically designed to fight against this framework, named by the scientific community as microtubules.

Contact: Nuria Noriega
nnoriega@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Genome Biology and Evolution
Ancient human genome from southern Africa throws light on our origins
The skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tells us about ourselves as humans, and throws some light on our earliest common genetic ancestry. The man's genome was sequenced and shown to be one of the 'earliest diverged' -- oldest in genetic terms -- found to-date in a region where modern humans are believed to have originated roughly 200,000 years ago.

Contact: Alison Heather
a.heather@garvan.org.uv
61-292-958-128
Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
2015 DOE JGI's science portfolio delves deeper into the Earth's data mine
In selecting 32 new projects with samples from diverse environments for the 2015 Community Science Program (CSP), the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute shifts 'from solving an organism's genome sequence to enabling an understanding of what this information enables organisms to do.' The total allocation of the CSP 2015 portfolio is expected to exceed 60 trillion bases -- the equivalent of 20,000 human genomes of plant, fungal and microbial genome sequences.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 28-Sep-2014
Nature
Human genome was shaped by an evolutionary arms race with itself
New findings by scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, suggest that an evolutionary arms race between rival elements within the genomes of primates drove the evolution of complex regulatory networks that orchestrate the activity of genes in every cell of our bodies. The arms race is between mobile DNA sequences known as 'retrotransposons' (a.k.a. 'jumping genes') and the genes that have evolved to control them.
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Project aims to turn mobile phones into detectors of disease-spreading insects
The Virtual Vector Project already has built an ingenious prototype to recognize species of triatomine bugs that spread Chagas disease, endemic in much of rural Mexico, Central America and South America.
University of Kansas Office of the Provost

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
New NIH/DOE grant for life science studies at NSLS-II
A new grant just awarded by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Energy will fund the operation of a suite of powerful experimental tools for Life Sciences research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Project launched to study evolutionary history of fungi
The University of California, Riverside is one of 11 collaborating institutions that are funded a total of $2.5 million by the National Science Foundation for a project focused on studying zygomycetes -- ancient lineages of fungi that include plant symbionts, animal and human pathogens and decomposers of a wide variety of organic compounds. Jason Stajich, an associate professor of plant pathology and microbiology, is principal investigator of the project called the 'Zygomycete Genealogy of Life.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Methods
Program predicts placement of chemical tags that control gene activity
Biochemists have developed a program that predicts the placement of chemical marks that control the activity of genes based on sequences of DNA. By comparing sequences with and without epigenomic modification, they identified DNA motifs associated with the changes. They call this novel analysis pipeline Epigram and have made both the program and the DNA motifs they identified openly available to other scientists.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Susan Brown
scinews@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
BGI Tech, DLF-Trifolium A/S, and Aarhus University applying genomic selection methods
BGI Tech Solutions Co., LTD., is providing sequencing service to Denmark-based DLF-Trifolium and the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University in an effort to develop a series of new high-yielding forage grass varieties by employing genomic selection methods.

Contact: Press Office
huwen@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Genetics
Want to link genes to complex traits? Start with more diversity
Life is rarely simple. From crop yields to disease risks, the biological characteristics people care most about are considered 'complex traits,' making it hard to identify the genes involved. Standard methods for tracking down such genes usually only implicate a broad genomic region, and the identities of the crucial gene/s remain a mystery. Now, geneticists are embracing a powerful approach that pinpoints more precise areas of the genome.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
press@genetics-gsa.org
202-412-1120
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Biodiversity Data Journal
Contributions on Fauna Europaea: Data papers as innovative model on expert involvement
Fauna Europaea started in 2000 as an EC-FP5 four-year project, delivering its first release in 2004. After 14 years of steady progress and successful participation in several EC projects to increase the general awareness of the work done by the contributors and to extend the general dissemination of the Fauna Europaea results, the Biodiversity Data Journal has applied its novel e-Publishing tools to prepare data papers for all 56 major taxonomic groups.

Contact: Yde de Jong
mail@yjong.net
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
eLife
Parts of genome without a known function may play a key role in the birth of new proteins
Researchers in Biomedical Informatics at IMIM and at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya have recently published a study in eLife showing that RNA called non-coding plays an important role in the evolution of new proteins, some of which could have important cell functions yet to be discovered.

Contact: Marta Calsina
mcalsina@imim.es
34-933-160-680
IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Scientists create therapy-grade stem cells using new cocktail to reprogram adult cells
Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed a new cocktail that coaxes adult cells to become pluripotent stem cells of a high enough quality to be used in therapeutic applications. Their research showed that using a different combination of reprogramming factors can produce a much higher quality result, delivering fewer colonies of iPSCs of which 80 percent passed the toughest pluripotency test.
Israeli Centers of Research Excellence Program, Kirschstein National Research Service Award, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Chapman Foundation, Florence Brill Graduate Student Fellowship

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
How learning to talk is in the genes
Researchers have found evidence that genetic factors may contribute to the development of language during infancy.

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of connections
A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, key brain networks.
National Institutes of Health, University of Michigan, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Re-publication of 'Flora of Northumberland and Durham' (1831): A dramatic account of change
The classical botanical work 'Flora of Northumberland and Durham' published by Nathaniel John Winch in 1831 is re-published through the innovative Advanced Books platform as an example of combining modern information technology together with historical scholarship to create a new sort of resource. This publication will be supporting ongoing research on the botany of the region, which can be seen as a model for other regions in Europe.

Contact: Quentin John Groom
qgroom@botanicalkeys.co.uk
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
RNAcentral station
RNAcentral, the first unified resource for all types of non-coding RNA data, has been launched today by the RNAcentral Consortium.

Contact: Mary Todd Bergman
contactpress@ebi.ac.uk
44-122-349-4665
University of Manchester

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
BGI Tech launches 2 major NGS service options to suit customers' specific needs
BGI Tech is launching two new ranges of next generation sequencing (NGS) services -- X bio and Intelligen -- to celebrate 15 years of successful genomic service provision. Covering a comprehensive and cutting-edge range of NGS service offerings, X bio and Intelligen have been optimized for different requirements so customers will find it even easier to select best and most cost-effective service for their particular needs.

Contact: Press Office
huwen@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
TGen and Dell provide critical tools for child-cancer research to NCI
Dell, Terascala and the Translational Genomics Research Institute are installing state-of-the-art computing and programing specialized for human genome investigations at the National Cancer Institute.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Entomology 2014
ESA names winners of AFRI student travel grants
The Entomological Society of America is pleased to announce that ten entomology students are recipients of travel grants awarded by the US Department of Agriculture's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative. The grants will provide financial support to graduate students for new networking, presentation, and research opportunities at Entomology 2014, the Entomology Society of America's 62nd Annual Meeting this November in Portland, Ore.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Rutgers receives $10 million pledge to advance treatment of cancer patients
A $10 million pledge to Rutgers University will help advance the treatment of patients with rare and virulent cancers that don't respond to standard therapies. The gift will strengthen the university's research and clinical practice of identifying genetic abnormalities that make tumors cancerous and using those details to fine-tune treatment. This rapidly growing approach to research and care is known as precision medicine.

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
InSilico Medicine salutes Calico and AbbVie partnership, paves way for Basel conference
InSilico Medicines honors the recent Calico and AbbVie collaboration, paving a pathway in aging research and development.

Contact: Michael Petr
michael.petr@insilicomedicine.com
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Journal of Insect Science
New parasitoid wasp species found in China
For the first time, wasps in the genus Spasskia have been found in China, including a species that is new to science.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
American Journal of Botany
Thousands of nuclear loci via target enrichment and genome skimming
A new approach in next-generation sequencing, called Hyb-Seq, uses targeted sequence capture via hybridization-based enrichment and makes it possible to sequence hundreds of genes at one time. The new protocol is poised to become the standard for efficiently producing genome-scale data sets to advance our understanding of the evolutionary history of plants, and is available in the September 2014 issue of Applications in Plant Sciences.
US National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Showing releases 26-50 out of 712.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>