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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 326-350 out of 845.

<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
PLOS Computational Biology
Dartmouth investigators conduct systematic testing of deimmunized biotherapeutic agents
By establishing protein design algorithms that simultaneously optimize drug candidates for both decreased immunogenic epitope content and high level stability and activity, researchers have established a novel testing platform. Published in PLOS Computational Biology, the paper, titled, 'Mapping the Pareto Optimal Design Space for a Functionally Deimmunized Biotherapeutic Candidate,' guides biotechnologists toward protein designs that function appropriately using sophisticated design algorithms.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kirk Cassels
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Genetics Society of America names Steven Henikoff as recipient of GSA Medal
The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce that Steven Henikoff, PhD, has been awarded the Genetics Society of America Medal in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field of genetics during the past 15 years. Dr. Henikoff will receive the award at the 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, organized by GSA, March 4-8, 2015 in Chicago, IL.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Nature Genetics
Introgression in the pig genome leads to their altitude adaptation
Scientists from Jiangxi Agricultural University, BGI and University of California published their latest research on genetic mechanism of pig altitude-adaptations in Nature Genetics online. Their research underlined the importance of introgression for the first time as a potential reason for pig adaptations to cold and hot environments, which provided novel insights into the evolutionary history of pigs and the role of introgression in adaptation more generally.

Contact: Hu Wen
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Penn's Joshua Plotkin to receive 2015 Akira Okubo Prize for Mathematical Biology
Joshua Plotkin of the University of Pennsylvania has been named winner of the 2015 Akira Okubo Prize, awarded jointly by the international Society for Mathematical Biology and the Japanese Society for Mathematical Biology. The award committee granted the award with 'great enthusiasm,' noting that, 'Plotkin's research achievements belie his young age.'
Society for Mathematical Biology, Japanese Society for Mathematical Biology

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
BioResearch Open Access
Integrins are essential in stem cell binding to defective cartilage for joint regeneration
The promise for using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to repair cartilage damage caused by osteoarthritis depends on the MSC being able to attach efficiently to the defective cartilage. A novel laboratory model in which artificially created cartilage lesions and labeled MSC were used to test factors that might improve MSC binding and the effectiveness of future MSC-based therapies is described in BioResearch Open Access.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Study validates Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome as a true representation of aging
Vision Genomics in collaboration with Insilico Medicine, and Howard University show that fibroblasts from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome patients and normal aging individuals strongly resemble each other in their signaling pathway activation states, and establish Progeria as a true accelerated aging disease.

Contact: Riya R. Kanherkar
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Nature Methods
Ribose-seq identifies and locates ribonucleotides in genomic DNA
Researchers have developed and tested a new technique known as ribose-seq that allows them to determine the full profile of ribonucleotides -- RNA fragments -- embedded in genomic DNA.
National Science Foundation, Georgia Research Alliance, American Cancer Society, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: John Toon
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Vilcek Foundation Honors prominent cell biologist and young researchers of promise
The Vilcek Foundation is pleased to announce the winners of the annual Vilcek Foundation Prizes, recognizing immigrant contributions to the American arts and sciences. Cell biologist Peter Walter will be honored with the $100,000 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science. The Creative Promise Prizes, which include awards of $50,000 each, will be presented to Sun Hur, Rob Knight, and Franziska Michor.
The Vilcek Foundation

Contact: Phuong Pham
Vilcek Foundation

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing 2016
Noisy data facilitates Dartmouth investigation of breast cancer gene expression
Dartmouth researchers reported in Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing on the use of denoising autoencoders to effectively extract key biological principles from gene expression data and summarize them into constructed features with convenient properties.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: kirk Cassels
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Study maps travel of H7 influenza genes
In a new bioinformatics analysis of the H7N9 influenza virus that has recently infected humans in China, researchers trace the separate phylogenetic histories of the virus's genes, giving a frightening new picture of viruses where the genes are traveling independently in the environment, across large geographic distances and between species, to form 'a new constellation of genes -- a new disease, based not only on H7, but other strains of influenza.'

Contact: James Hathaway
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Next-generation sequencing offers insight into how species adapt to climate change
Next-generation sequencing allows for the creation and analysis of vast amounts of data about populations and their responses to shifting environmental conditions, including climate change. These data can provide fine-scale information at the genomic level into populations' adaptations to changing circumstances. Despite the potential usefulness of next-generation sequencing for environmental scientists, it is a costly tool, and funding has yet to equal the value that it may provide.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program

Contact: James Verdier
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Nature Genetics
Harnessing data from Nature's great evolutionary experiment
Researchers at CSHL have developed a new computational method to identify which letters in the human genome are functionally important. Their computer program, called fitCons, harnesses the power of evolution, comparing changes in DNA letters across not just related species, but also between multiple individuals in a single species. The results provide a surprising picture of just how little of our genome has been 'conserved' by Nature.
National Institutes of Health, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, Cornell Center for Comparative and Population Genomics

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Applications in Plant Sciences
Mapping the maize genome
Maize is one of the most important cereal crops in the world. The complete genome of maize has been sequenced, but its size and complexity presents a challenge to researchers seeking to identify specific genes responsible for traits. Positional cloning has been used successfully in smaller genomes; researchers have applied this mapping technique to the maize genome and have published their protocol -- the first detailed step-by-step protocol on positional cloning -- in Applications in Plant Sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
Botanical Society of America

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Nature Biotechnology
Hidden cell types revealed
A new method improves single-cell genomics analyses. This method clarifies the true differences and similarities between cells by modelling relatedness and removing confounding variables. Scientists can use known molecular pathways to better understand cancer cells, differentiation processes and the pathogenesis of diseases.
European Research Council, European Commission Marie Curie Fellowship, European Molecular Biology Organization

Contact: Mary Todd Bergman
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Early returns on 2014 show significant growth in use of GBIF
Preliminary statistics suggest that worldwide use of and interest in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility grew significantly during 2014. While thorough analysis will require more time, GBIF Secretariat's ongoing monitoring program of scientific research literature suggests a 35 percent increase during 2014 in the use and citation of biodiversity data accessed via GBIF's open-access infrastructure. More people -- 738,649 users from 236 countries -- have visited more often, too, logging more than 1.13 million sessions during 2014.

Contact: Kyle Copas
Global Biodiversity Information Facility

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Pitt study links biomarkers to long-term kidney damage and death in critically ill
High levels of two novel urinary biomarkers early in critical illness are associated with adverse long-term outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), according to an international, multi-center study led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Researchers. AKI is a condition that often affects those in intensive care and can occur hours to days after serious infections, surgery or taking certain medications.
Astute Medical, Inc.

Contact: Rick Pietzak
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Software created to help find a cure for a 'great neglected disease'
For decades, scientists around the world have worked to develop a treatment for schistosomiasis, a debilitating water-born parasite. To aid this research, scientists at San Francisco State University have developed software that helps assess the impact of a drug on the parasite. Singh and his team recently completed the Quantal Dose Response Calculator, software that analyzes images showing the effects of potential drugs on parasites and quantifies their effectiveness.

Contact: Beth Tagawa
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Applications in Plant Sciences
One pipeline that combines many gene-finding tools
MAKER2 is an annotation pipeline that combines multiple programs into a single bioinformatics tool that can produce genome annotations even with limited data. In a study in a recent issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, researchers develop a MAKER2 workflow using the phylogenetically challenging genus Penstemon to create a large-scale data set from limited genomic data. A sample protocol, sequence libraries, functional annotation files, and other resources are also provided.

Contact: Beth Parada
Botanical Society of America

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
Leopoldina publishes recommendations on handling changes in the life sciences
Modern high-throughput screening methods for analyzing genetic information, proteins and metabolic products offer new ways of obtaining large quantities of data on life processes. These OMICS technologies are fueling hopes of major advances in, e.g., medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, food sciences. The report 'Life sciences in transition' by Germany's National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina sets out recommendations on how existing deficiencies can be overcome and research better equipped for the challenges.

Contact: Caroline Wichmann

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Eight graduate students and postdocs receive GSA's DeLill Nasser Award
The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is proud to name eight early-career scientists -- four graduate students and four postdoctoral researchers -- as spring 2015 recipients of GSA's DeLill Nasser Award for Professional Development in Genetics. The award provides a $1,000 travel grant for each recipient to attend any national or international meeting, conference, or laboratory course that will enhance his or her career.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
The 'Berlin patient,' first and only person cured of HIV, speaks out
Timothy Ray Brown, long known only as the 'Berlin Patient' had HIV for 12 years before he became the first person in the world to be cured of the infection following a stem cell transplant in 2007. He recalls his many years of illness, a series of difficult decisions, and his long road to recovery in the first-person account, 'I Am the Berlin Patient: A Personal Reflection,' published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of Cell Biology
When DNA gets sent to time-out
For a skin cell to do its job, it must turn on a completely different set of genes than a liver cell -- and keep genes it doesn't need switched off. One way of turning off large groups of genes at once is to send them to 'time-out' at the edge of the nucleus. New research shows how DNA gets sent to the nucleus' far edge, a process critical to controlling genes and determining cell fate.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Catherine Kolf
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
UMMS to develop a model for predicting gene expression in dendritic cells
Deciphering the language of gene expression, UMMS scientists Jeremy Luban, M.D., and Manuel Garber, Ph.D., received $6.1 million from the NIH to develop a model system for exploring gene regulation using human dendritic cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Fessenden
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Cell Reports
Imaging linking cell activity and behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind
An automated method (much more sensitive than fMRI) to detect the activity of neurons during specific behaviors, at the resolution of individual brain cells throughout the entire mouse brain, has been successfully demonstrated. A team shows brain activation patterns when male mice perform two critical tasks: recognizing other individuals and determining the sex of another individual.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation for Autism Research, Allen Institute for Brain Science, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Contact: Peter Tarr
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Dec-2014
Molecular Cell
Penn scientists identify patterns of RNA regulation in the nuclei of plants
In a new study done in plants, University of Pennsylvania biologists give a global view of the patterns that can affect the various RNA regulatory processes that occur before these molecules move into the cytoplasm, where they are translated into the proteins that make up a living organism.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
University of Pennsylvania

Showing releases 326-350 out of 845.

<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>