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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 712.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Genomatix Pathway System (GePS) now available in Illumina's BaseSpace Apps
Genomatix has added the Genomatix Pathway System (GePS) to BaseSpace Apps, Illumina's dedicated applications store and informatics community dedicated to advancing genomic analysis. Using GePS, researchers can generate and visualize genetic networks and pathways and easily access a multitude of data on the genes and gene-gene connections they consist of. Combined with expression level data generated through next-generation sequencing experiments, GePS helps scientists identify the key players within biological processes at a functional level.

Contact: Korbinian Grote
grote@genomatix.de
49-895-997-6661
Genomatix Software GmbH

Public Release: 10-Sep-2013
Nymi by Bionym launches using your unique heartbeat to unlock your world
The next generation of biometric technology launches today with the Nymi, from Bionym, a technology start-up founded by University of Toronto engineering graduates. The Nymi is the world's first wearable authentication device that uses your unique heartbeat to unlock your identity.

Contact: Kurt Bartlett
KBartlett@bionym.com
647-637-3390
University of Toronto

Public Release: 9-Sep-2013
2013 Balzan prizewinners announced today in press conference in Milan
The names of the 2013 Balzan Prizewinners were proclaimed today in a public announcement: André Vauchez (France), Université de Paris Ouest Nanterre, for Medieval History; Manuel Castells (Spain), University of Southern California (USA), for Sociology; Alain Aspect (France), École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, for Quantum Information Processing and Communication; and Pascale Cossart (France), Institut Pasteur, Paris, for Infectious diseases: basic and clinical aspects.

Contact: Susannah Gold
susannah@goldcommunications.net
917-207-5375
Gold Communications

Public Release: 6-Sep-2013
New NIH grants to investigate disease-related variations in genetic makeup
Five research teams have received new four-year awards to study the genomics of disease susceptibility in ethnically diverse populations. The projects aim to unravel the subtle variations in genetic makeup among groups -- including African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Hispanics and more -- that may account for differences in risks for conditions such as high blood pressure and high blood lipids, in addition to common diseases such as cancer and heart disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
American Journal of Human Genetics
Peering into genetic defects, CU scientists discover a new metabolic disease
An international team of scientists, including University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado researchers, has discovered a new disease related to an inability to process Vitamin B12. The disorder is rare but can be devastating.

Contact: Dan Meyers
dan.meyers@ucdenver.edu
303-724-7904
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Illinois biologists and bioinformaticians unite to explore the origins of social behavior
A new $3 million grant from the Simons Foundation to the Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois will fund a multidisciplinary collaborative effort to search for similarities in the ways that the brains of many different species, including our own, produce social behavior.
Simons Foundation

Contact: Nicholas Vasi
nvasi@illinois.edu
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wide range of differences, mostly unseen, among humans
Bioinformatics researchers at Rutgers University and the Technische Universitaet Muenchen have investigated how protein function is affected by changes at the DNA level. Their findings bring new clarity to the wide range of variants, many of which disturb protein function but have no discernible health effect, and highlight especially the role of rare variants in differentiating individuals from their neighbors.
Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

Contact: Patrick Regan
patrick.regan@tum.de
49-016-242-79876
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
PLOS ONE
What scientists can see in your pee
Researchers at the University of Alberta announced today that they have determined the chemical composition of human urine. The study, which took more than seven years and involved a team of nearly 20 researchers, has revealed that more than 3,000 chemicals or "metabolites" can be detected in urine. The results are expected to have significant implications for medical, nutritional, drug and environmental testing.
Genome Canada, Genome Alberta, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Research Council

Contact: Jamie Hanlon
jamie.hanlon@ualberta.ca
780-492-9214
University of Alberta

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
First study to investigate the human genome in multiple sclerosis
The National Institutes of Health awarded Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason a $1.9 million grant to find marks in the human genome which can explain why some white blood cells cause damage to the spinal cord and brain in multiple sclerosis (MS). This is the first study to look for molecular changes in the genome of specific immune cells responsible for the devastation caused by MS.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kay Branz
kbranz@benaroyaresearch.org
206-342-6903
Immune Tolerance Network

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Making plants' inner qualities visible
Not only psychologists would be happy to be able to look inside their patients' heads -- a plant's "inner qualities" also supply plant researchers with valuable information. A special camera analyzes the constituents of grapevines, corn and other plants.

Contact: Dr. Udo Seiffert
udo.seiffert@iff.fraunhofer.de
49-391-409-0107
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
ZooKeys
Revolving images and multi-image keys open new horizons in descriptive taxonomy
A paper recently published in the open access journal ZooKeys presents an innovative case study aiming to overcome the challenges faced by taxonomists in describing complex structures essential for species description and identification. The authors use multiple techniques, including an interactive key and rotatable scanning electron microscope images to meet these challenges.

Contact: Nesrine Akkari
nakkari@snm.ku.dk
45-35-32-10-01
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 2-Sep-2013
The future of biodiversity publishing
The EU e-Infrastructure coordination project "pro-iBiosphere", targeting the preparation of a European Open Biodiversity Knowledge Management System, makes thirteen recommendations to enhance the publication process to make biodiversity data accessible, computable and re-usable.

Contact: Donat Agosti
agosti@plazi.org
41-765-069-092
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 2-Sep-2013
Recommendations on how to move the naming of organisms from paper and on to the Internet
The EU e-Infrastructure coordination project "pro-iBiosphere", targeting the preparation of a European Open Biodiversity Knowledge Management System, makes ten recommendations to increase the adoption of digital workflows in the biodiversity domain.

Contact: Dr. Quentin Groom
quentin.groom@br.fgov.be
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 30-Aug-2013
2013 MSA Coalition Annual Conference
CARRE Foundation selects TGen for unprecedented research into causes of multiple system atrophy
Under the banner, "Quest to Cure MSA in honor of Rex Griswold," the Translational Genomics Research Institute today was tapped to conduct the world's most in-depth genomic investigation into the causes of MSA. The project is funded by a $100,000 grant from the CARRE Foundation, part of CSP Business Media. MSA was selected as the beneficiary of a 2013 CARRE Foundation fundraising event in honor of Nestle's Rex Griswold.
Charitable Alliance of Restaurant and Retail Executives Foundation

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Aug-2013
Science
Young whoopers stay the course when they follow a wise old bird
How do birds find their way on migration? Is their route encoded in their genes, or learned? Working with records from a long-term effort to reintroduce critically endangered whooping cranes in the Eastern US, University of Maryland-led researchers found these long-lived birds learn the route from older cranes, and get better at it with age.
National Science Foundation, LOEWE Programme, Robert Bosch Foundation

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 29-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Tracking Huntington's disease through brain metabolism
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, David Eidelberg and colleagues at the Feinstein Institute of Medical Research, evaluated changes in the brain metabolism of a small group of preclinical HD carriers over the course of seven years and identified a metabolic network that is associated with HD progression. Measurable increases in the activity of this network were predictive of time to symptom onset.
National Institutes of Health, CHDI Foundation Inc.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 29-Aug-2013
Cell
Compounds point the way to cancer's dependencies
The Broad Institute's Center for the Science of Therapeutics today announced the launch of its Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal -- a critical resource for advancing the discovery of potential cancer drugs matched to the patient populations most likely to benefit from them. The portal contains more than 70,000 connections between compound sensitivities and genetic or lineage features of cancer cell lines -- creating a public resource for finding therapeutically exploitable vulnerabilities in different cancer types.
Cancer Target Discovery and Development Network

Contact: Nicole Davis
ndavis@broadinstitute.org
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Aug. 27, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Aug. 27, 2013, in the JCI: Hearing loss associated with a lack of cell-cell junctions, Cancerous cells from donor kidney linked to recipient skin cancer, A strategy for combating drug-resistant cancers, Protease inhibitor resistance involves multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle, Origin of a hereditary east Texas bleeding disorder, and more.
National Institutes of Health, Région Ile de France, Deafness Research Foundation, NRPB, National Security Council, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
American Journal of Human Genetics
Researchers develop software tool for cancer genomics
Researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the National Cancer Institute have developed a new bioinformatics software tool designed to more easily identify genetic mutations responsible for cancers.

Contact: Maureen Mack
mmack@mcw.edu
Medical College of Wisconsin

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
PLOS ONE
Study offers insight into the origin of the genetic code, team reports
An analysis of enzymes that load amino acids onto transfer RNAs -- an operation at the heart of protein translation -- offers new insights into the evolutionary origins of the modern genetic code, researchers report. Their findings appear in the journal PLOS ONE.
National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Methods
New tool enhances the search for genetic mutations
Reed Cartwright, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, along with colleagues at ASU, Washington University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK, report on a new software tool known as DeNovoGear, which uses statistical probabilities to help identify mutations and more accurately pinpoint their source and their possible significance for health.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Genetics
Scientists pinpoint 105 additional genetic errors that cause cystic fibrosis
Of the over 1,900 errors already reported in the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), it is unclear how many of them actually contribute to the inherited disease. Now a team of researchers reports significant headway in figuring out which mutations are benign and which are deleterious. In so doing, they have increased the number of known CF-causing mutations from 22 to 127, accounting for 95 percent of the variations found in patients with CF.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
Nature Biotechnology
Genome researchers at Bielefeld University decode the hamster genome
Genome researchers from Bielefeld University's Center for Biotechnology headed by Professor Dr. Alfred Pühler have succeeded in sequencing the genome of the Chinese hamster. The Chinese hamster supplies the cell cultures used by the pharmaceutical industry to produce biopharmaceutical products such as antibodies used in medicine. This costly project was only possible thanks to a cooperation between Bielefeld University and its international project partners. The researchers have now published their results in the internationally renowned scientific journal 'Nature Biotechnology'.

Contact: Dr. Alfred Pühler
puehler@cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de
49-052-110-68750
Bielefeld University

Public Release: 15-Aug-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
JCI early table of contents for Aug. 15, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, Aug. 15, 2013, in the JCI: Biomarkers predict time to ovarian cancer recurrence, A molecule involved in development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Intestinal epithelial vitamin D receptor signaling inhibits experimental colitis and many more.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 14-Aug-2013
Nature
Cancer's origins revealed
Scientists have provided the first comprehensive genomic map of mutational processes that drive tumour development. Together, these mutational processes explain the majority of mutations found in 30 of the most common cancer types.

Contact: Aileen Sheehy
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-92368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Showing releases 351-375 out of 712.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>